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  1. #11

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    Class action lawsuit? This might be just the thing to kickstart film camera production back into high gear...

  2. #12

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    I might try the alcohol trick on the lens I have - it was essentially free (price paid was worth it for the camera) so I've not lost anything.
    Matt

  3. #13
    BobD's Avatar
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    The only way I know of to prevent it is to not buy rubberized cameras.

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    The material is also used by Canon, of which several professional level 35mm cameras (EOS 1N and early issue 1V bodies) have suffered the same malaise around the side (palm) door and in some cases the entire side where the hand grips the body and the grip itself. The only sure cure is to have the affected part removed and replaced, which in today's era, is drawing a fairly long bow.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  5. #15

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    I can't wait til someone recovers an F100 in leather...

    The F100 I use is sticky and soft, to the point that the camera strap will leave a nylon weave pattern on it

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer Jay View Post
    Hi All,
    I recently unlimbered a Minolta Maxxum 7 and a Nikon N80 from their storage shelf in my air conditioned Florida house and was distressed to discover that the backs on both had become quite sticky. I have owned both for several years and they were fine about 6 months ago. I have researched correcting this problem extensively and tried a variety of solutions but none work well.
    What I'm looking for is good advice about how to PREVENT it from occuring on my numerous other cameras which have rubberized finishes. No one seems to know exactly what causes the problem because it can occur in cameras which are stored in cool, dry conditions and are not exposed to body oil, sweat etc. It could be simply a degradation of the material inherent with age, but it seems that some cameras of the same model and age get it and others don't.
    I am thinking that a paste wax, while making the camera slipperier, might seal the surface, or perhaps using something else with sealant properties to keep air from the rubberized surface, but I'm just not sure. Because they are so cheap, I have already replaced the N80, but I'm feeling sad about the Maxxum 7 because it is literally too gooey to use despite alcohol clean up attempts. I don't want to replace it untill I have some idea as to how to protect the new one.
    Any ideas from you rubberized polymer experts out there?
    Thanks in advance,
    Jay
    The only sure cure for rubberised finish getting sticky is to never have anything with a rubberised finish.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobD View Post
    The only way I know of to prevent it is to not buy rubberized cameras.
    Exactly. Why would anyone want one? Just more new-fangled crap that wears out in 20 or 30 years.

  8. #18

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    The SF7s I've noticed this on are at least twenty years old already. I see no reason for them to break down unless mistreated.

    The later MZ-series bodies however appear to be the proverbial time bomb. There's a tiny plastic drive cog on a motor near the lens mount (below and to the right as you hold the camera normally). As is common with many small plastic cogs it was moulded a bit too small for the motor shaft, so it eventually splits. You can buy a replacement motor with a metal cog but it looks seriously fiddly to install.
    Matt

  9. #19
    dmschnute's Avatar
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    This may have no bearing on the problem, but for what it's worth .....

    Canoes made of Royalex (which I understand is basically vinyl) do the same thing in their later years. The recommended solvent is denatured alcohol. It removed the sticky nicely, and I followed it with a rubdown with Armorall, the milky-white stuff intended for leather and vinyl. So far, it has not recurred.

    d.

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