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  1. #1
    bvy
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    XA2 Underexposing...

    I'm having a curious problem with my Olympus XA2. I've gotten two rolls back, and I'm noticing that shots where the sky figures prominently in the scene are dreadfully underexposed. Foreground objects are in complete shadow. Other shots (of low contrast scenes or scenes without a sky) are just fine. I'm using Superia 400 and the ISO is set properly. The batteries are fresh. Also, this is my "backup" XA2; my son took my other XA2 for a photography course he's taking this semester. Point is, I know this camera pretty well, and I'm pretty sure I'm not doing anything wrong.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Maybe small sensor above lens for light meter is dirty or foggy?

  3. #3
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Isn't this the sort of scene where you should move the lever on the bottom to +1.5 to get extra exposure?

    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    Maybe small sensor above lens for light meter is dirty or foggy?
    That would give over-exposure.


    Steve.

  4. #4
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    If it is consistently a problem, then lie to the camera about the speed of the film, after you have confirmed the batteries are fresh and their contact surfaces are clean.

    Set it to 50 if you are using 100 film. This is not a DX camera; the user provides the input on the base film speed.

    Then the old favourite x1.5 lever. So much of the XA got left out when the XA2 came out - at least this thing stayed.
    my real name, imagine that.

  5. #5
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    darkosaric: Perhaps I am wrong, but if the sensor were dirty wouldn't that OVERexpose by letting the sensor see less light and therefore force the camera to give more exposure?

    Of course, I never expose color negative film at box speed, always half that speed.

    The XA family had a problem that frequently shows up: shutters that don't click when they are supposed to. Pressing the shutter button can result in immediate exposure (as it should) or can result in nothing happening. After a few seconds, (with another pressing of the shutter button) it might work (as if suddenly 'booted up') but this has been a recurring problem with this camera and has been talked about on APUG. - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 12-03-2012 at 08:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    darkosaric: Perhaps I am wrong, but if the sensor were dirty wouldn't that OVERexpose by letting the sensor see less light and therefore force the camera to give more exposure?
    Overexpose - true, true, my bad

    -Darko
    Last edited by darkosaric; 12-03-2012 at 02:35 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    I'm having a curious problem with my Olympus XA2. I've gotten two rolls back, and I'm noticing that shots where the sky figures prominently in the scene are dreadfully underexposed. Foreground objects are in complete shadow. Other shots (of low contrast scenes or scenes without a sky) are just fine. I'm using Superia 400 and the ISO is set properly. The batteries are fresh. Also, this is my "backup" XA2; my son took my other XA2 for a photography course he's taking this semester. Point is, I know this camera pretty well, and I'm pretty sure I'm not doing anything wrong.

    Any ideas?
    How are you using the meter? If there were a problem with the camera, it would be evident on most of the negatives. Usually if the camera underexposes all the time, one would lower the ISO setting on the meter.

  8. #8
    darinwc's Avatar
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    "I'm having a curious problem with my Olympus XA2. I've gotten two rolls back, and I'm noticing that shots where the sky figures prominently in the scene are dreadfully underexposed."

    Thats pretty telling. Most cameras will underexpose if there are large amounts of sky, you should definately use the +1.5 for these shots. If all the shots are under-exposed, change the ISO.

    However, heres two things to check.. 1. Check the window just above the lens. Make sure it is clean. As you change the ISO you should see a slit change size behind it.
    2. Check the batteries. You should use Silver Oxide batteries. Alkaline batteries do not offer a consistent voltage.
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

  9. #9
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Also check the battery contacts. Sometimes when these are not quite clean enough, there is enough current flow to make you think everything is o.k. but the extra load of the shutter via the resistance of any build up on the contacts leads to a momentary reduction in voltage at the camera.

    I had this happen to an XA2.


    Steve.

  10. #10

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    It definitely sounds like a situation where you'd use the exposure compensation dial. I used to get that all the time with slide film until I learned how to meter properly (I tend to point the camera at sunlit grass to get a reading, then compose and shoot. It works for me).
    Matt

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