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  1. #11
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Although they're not US made, if you want to do the Robert Capa thing, bring a Contax rangefinder. Just don't let someone rush the souping of your film

  2. #12

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    My pop was in the D-Day invasion, as part of a medical supply depot. He packed a camera with him - a KW Pilot Super. So one of these would be authentic to the invasion, although not US-made.

    http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Pilot_Super

    It was, coincidentally, the first camera I ever used. I didn't realize the significance; after all, what does a 5-year old kid know about war?

  3. #13

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    A no-front-swings Deardorff and an American made Goerz Dagor in an Ilex shutter. Second choice would be a Speeder with an Ektar.
    Super-XX Pan film in either.

    edit - "Ektar" should probably be "Kodak Anastigmat"
    Last edited by E. von Hoegh; 12-15-2012 at 10:11 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
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    Frist choice would be a Speed Graphic, and second choice would be a Leica III. There were plenty of those in use on both sides. You could buy a Wollensak 90mm lens for it, and some Leica lenses were made in Canada.


    Kent in SD

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by mopar_guy View Post
    In the 1940's, 35mm was not really a "big" thing in the US.\
    I have lots of 35mm slides from that period that would disagree with that statement. I suspect the most popular consumer film from that era was 620; however, note that Argus began producing the C3 in 1939.

  6. #16

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    surprised only one person mentioned a kodak medalist -- one of those easily could have been used in the invasion, they were standard military issue, and built to withstand bullets --- click on this link === http://blog.baquephoto.com/?p=92 -- and as you scroll down you will see a cartoon of a WAC smacking a Nazi with one. She could easily have used it to take his picture next, too.

    Re-roll some film onto 620 spools you can still use it, too. If you need any, let me know -- years ago I bought a brick of Verichrome Pan to feed mine and kept all the empties.

    From the article linked:

    ““If there have ever been an American Collectible camera, this would be it. Built like a Tank during World War II the GI affectionately called it the “American Leica”.

    In many ways it was better than a Leica for its intended purpose. Its large negative format, 6X9, not only faithfully illustrated the pages of Life Magazine, but it made the camera specially suited for aerial reconnaissance missions a type of photography, where big, faithful enlargements of enemy terrain was a much needed ability.

    Although Aluminum and steel were in short supply during the war, this camera used them generously to ensure the design mission of creating a camera just as tough and reliable as a Jeep, under all circumstances. The lens focusing mount, for example was based on a tough, generous, aluminum helicoid, that allowed for a luxurious extension capable of shooting from infinity all the way down to three an a half feet. This focusing range, unusual for a medium format camera was made possible by a gorgeous optical lens design, that, although expensive to manufacture, is still one of the best optical designs available, when outstanding focal range is a prime consideration, giving the camera great versatility on the field.

    The design criteria was that if pictures could save the lives of soldiers. Good pictures definitely would. Thus the Medalist was born.

    If you would like to have a camera that itself is a product of the World History, that is charged with the power of American Patriotism and that of events that changed the course of the World, this is one of them!”

    it's also an incredibly usable camera -- on mine, anyway, the film registration mechanism works like a charm, the viewfinder is parallax-compensating and pretty large as these things go, the shutter works like a champ and the Ektar lens is worth its reputation. It's pretty quick to use as a result, since winding the film also cocks the shutter.
    Last edited by summicron1; 12-15-2012 at 03:51 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: adding information

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    surprised only one person mentioned a kodak medalist
    It was a great camera; one passed through my hands as a used camera when I worked in a camera store in the late 1950's and I've always been sorry I didn't buy it myself.

  8. #18

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    I have a 1940 Kodak Ektra that needs servicing: split the cost of the service with you and you could take it ;-)

  9. #19

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    I second the Argus C3. I have one, easy to repair yourself, easy to load, change lenses etc., not a bad photo taker either. They seemed the camera of choice for beginning photographers back them. It was my first 35mm camera.

  10. #20
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    I think the Kodak 35 would be in the running as well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kodak_35_Rangefinder
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 800px-Kodak_35RF.JPG  
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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