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  1. #41
    AgX
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    The camera mechanics should work even under water.

    On the optics however the lens and camera body would be useless after a certain amount of water has got inside. Also the film might suffer, in any case it would not be easy to handle it later.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    The camera mechanics should work even under water.

    On the optics however the lens and camera body would be useless after a certain amount of water has got inside. Also the film might suffer, in any case it would not be easy to handle it later.
    Thanks for answering: Do you have any idea if a journalist, back then, would have traveled with it (on board a carrier, for example) in a way that would protect it from water?

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by WriterGrl View Post
    @AgX

    Would the Kodak 35 that you mention still operate if it got wet? I'm writing a novel--historical fiction--about a journalist aboard the U.S.S. Princeton when it's sunk at the Battle of Leyte Gulf.
    Moisture between the shutter blades would likely cause it to stick, and salt water in the shutter mechanism (gear train and escapement) would destroy it in a few days. The Kodak 35 was my very first high quality camera ca. 1975, I was 14.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Moisture between the shutter blades would likely cause it to stick, and salt water in the shutter mechanism (gear train and escapement) would destroy it in a few days. The Kodak 35 was my very first high quality camera ca. 1975, I was 14.
    edit - I don't know of any waterproof case for that camera. Protection from spray/splashes would have been an oilcloth or rubberized waterproof bag or other sort of covering.

  5. #45

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    Hmm. OK. I will either have to remove my journalist from the scene of the sinking, or make it so somehow he keeps his camera from getting wet. The joys of historical fiction.

    Many thanks @E.von Hoegh

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by WriterGrl View Post
    @AgX

    Would the Kodak 35 that you mention still operate if it got wet? I'm writing a novel--historical fiction--about a journalist aboard the U.S.S. Princeton when it's sunk at the Battle of Leyte Gulf.
    The armory aboard the Princeton would have had a variety of watertight ammunition boxes that an enterprising journalist may have obtained for keeping a camera, film, and journal dry in emergencies. The common .50 caliber machine gun ammo box probably wouldn't hold a 4x5 Anniversary model Speed Graphic, but the 3.25x4.25 model or smaller cameras should fit. Journalists often used their personal equipment, or gear loaned by whoever they were working for. Some, like Eugene Smith, carried a variety of cameras. "When he started from the Pacific Coast for Hawaii, Gene Smith had two Ikoflexes, a Rolleiflex, a 4x5 Graflex, a Speed Graphic for color and another fitted for aerial work, a Contax with five lenses, and a Kodak Medalist." Eight months later most needed repairs. W. Eugene Smith : the life and work of an American photographer by Jim Hughes. This might be a good book for background information on a great photojournalist in WWII and later.

  7. #47
    AgX
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    We should distinguish between

    -) camera sealed or put in sealed casing to be submerged for underwater photography or terrestial photography with immense water pressure as within waterfalls

    -) camera stored waterproof (those ammunition boxes)

    -) camera protected against heavy water spray (as on a sailing boat)

    I guess Writer Girl is referring to the latter.

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    Indeed, I am referring to the latter.

    @Jim Jones. You my friend, are a wealth of knowledge. I'll be reserving the book about Smith at the library.

  9. #49
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    Protection against spray might suffice for civilian recreational sailors, but the rigors of Navy service make camera protection against immersion and shock desirable. I doubt that most Navy men provided such protection, even of their own equipment. Certainly I didn't, but my chances of being in combat were slim. Personal storage space aboard Navy ships was meager. I had little convenient storage space, with rarely used items stored elsewhere with limited access. This was years after WWII when living conditions were quite improved.

  10. #50
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    As stated above, submerging in salt water is deadly for most cameras if not washed out quickly. And even then you're probably looking at a complete clean and re-lubrication.

    A Kodak 35 could most certainly be in the hands a journalist during World War 2, as they were introduced in 1938. The Kodak 35 RF too.

    One of U-96s crewmembers brought Lothar Buchheim's Leica camera back to life while still out at sea. The camera had jammed solid from the build-up of salt from the constant spray he suffered while out in the conningtower of the submarine.

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