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  1. #11
    polyglot's Avatar
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    All the lenses have been taken up by Sony shooters so there's a huge excess of Maxxum bodies.

  2. #12
    hoffy's Avatar
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    It kinda sucks when you have a cupboard of them (I have 6 Maxxum/Dynax/Alpha bodies in my cupboard), but its a boon if you want to use quality Minolta/Sony/Ziess lenses on film.

    That being said, the last of the great Minolta bodies, the 9, still commands reasonable money (around $300 to $400, depending on what phase the moon is in).

  3. #13

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    About 2 years ago I was gifted a brace of Minolta AF film gear including 2 Dynax 7 bodies and a Maxxum 800si. These are the Japanese market versions, along with the 5600HS flash and 8 lenses - mainly Cosina, Tamron and Tokina. Even received a Kenko 500mm Cat lens.

    Ashamed to say that I haven't used them yet as I'm mainly a Canon FD user. The user manuals for this lot are about 200 pages in all. Makes my Canon T90 look quite basic and this is perhaps why I haven't put film, through them yet. I doubt that I will use them unless I have a need for the functionality they provide that I cannot get out of the FD gear I have. Perhaps the wireless TTL flash or I may want to play with the 500mm CAT. The Tokina 100-400 zoom may be slightly tempting as my FD lenses max out at 300mm.

    One thing that annoys me with the Dynax 7 bodies is the 'sticky' rubber syndrome they have both developed. What were the manufacturers thinking about when they formulated that rubbish. As I have nothing to lose I may attempt to strip it off and replace it although I'll probably have to make my own templates.

    If I ever go to the dark side I could go Sony and have plenty of lenses to play with but it doesn't tempt me at the moment. A Canon A720 PS camera does the 'record keeping' type shots quite adequately.

  4. #14

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    Pick up one of these Maxxum's. Handle it, feel it in your hands.

    Now pick up and fondle a SRT series camera.

    There is your answer.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    All the lenses have been taken up by Sony shooters so there's a huge excess of Maxxum bodies.
    That is true, except nearly all of these were sold with zooms that aren't very popular with digi shooters. I think they just sold so darned many of these, and there are so few buyers, that the are like zucchinis in August; you can hardly give them away. I happened into Maxxum from the Sony side when I got curious about how some of the lenses would do on film.

    Somebody gave me a 7000 body. I really hated the looks and operation of all this generation of cameras and didn't touch the thing for quite some time. Now it has kind of grown on me. I guess having to screw around some with modern cameras has made me a little (only a little) more tolerant of button and menu controls.

    Recently the same person gave me a Maxxum 5 body. I almost refused it, even free. It is a flimsy, non-intuitive thing (unless you like full auto everything), with a crappy finder. But I've found out it is amazingly capable camera in its own way, and is now my favorite bicycle carry camera. It is so light it feels like the plastic packaging for for something.

    Some of the zooms are good too. Like the 35-70 f4 that you can get for under $50, The only trouble comes from how few fast primes (except 50/1.7) were sold, making them disproportionately expensive.

    And, of course, the retro thing is a factor. I have a Nikon 6006 which I think is really a better camera than an FM, if you want autowind. I tried to sell it here and couldn't get $25 out of it. Ditto the F80 I can't sell at any price; not a camera to substitute for an FM, but a spectacularly nice camera of it's kind.
    Last edited by Mark Crabtree; 12-19-2012 at 11:27 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    It just goes to prove that most people know the price of everything, and the value of nothing.
    Ben

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertratt View Post
    I think you're onto something. I have been buying too many old film cameras rececntly and I am astounded how cheap Minoltas are -- some old, some newer. I have a couple of bodies that are not so hot and some that are as sweet a film camera as you would ever want.
    I bought a Nikon F70 body the other day, in nice condition, for $20. I remember buying one of these new in the 1990s and paying over $500. Ouch. But Minoltas are even cheaper.
    I wonder if Minolta just don't get no respect these days, or what?
    I've been looking at cheap Minoltas too. As I remember the Rokkor lenses were excellent.
    The only reason I don't get one is that I have a good Nikon outfit and can't justify another system...
    But surely, just one old SRT can't hurt...

  8. #18
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    Yes, the ergonomics of traditional SLRs are, indeed, better. And, yes, people know the price of everything but not the value. The Maxxum zooms are great. But...

    Minolta used to be one of the very most sought after names back in the 60s and 70s. - David Lyga

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertratt View Post
    I think you're onto something. I have been buying too many old film cameras rececntly and I am astounded how cheap Minoltas are -- some old, some newer. I have a couple of bodies that are not so hot and some that are as sweet a film camera as you would ever want.
    I bought a Nikon F70 body the other day, in nice condition, for $20. I remember buying one of these new in the 1990s and paying over $500. Ouch. But Minoltas are even cheaper.
    I wonder if Minolta just don't get no respect these days, or what?
    When I bought my first Auto Focus SLR back in the early 90's, I really wanted to buy a Minolta 700si - but I simply couldn't afford it. In the end, I bought a 303si Super (Japanese variant - basically a 500si Super). From memory, the 700si body was around a grand back then.

    About 5 years ago, an aquantance (not even a friend) found out I was into film camera's and new that I had Minolta's. He GAVE me his in excellent condition 700si (+ a 5xi to boot), with battery grip and a handful of those silly cards you could put in them.

    I don't think its just Minolta though. Look for any consumer level Canon or Pentax from the late 80's through to the late 90's - its the same deal. There are still some good value Minolta's available (like the last model 7 and 9).

  10. #20
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Maybe some buyers don't know that late Minolta cameras have the same bayonet mount of Sony cameras. In fact, Sony just bought the Minolta business. Sony cameras ARE Minolta cameras. Minolta never died, just changed hands. Some people ignore this and probably ignore that they can use modern Sony and Zeiss lenses on certain Minolta cameras. This can make Minolta cameras less looked after.

    Some other people might have read somewhere that Minolta cameras require manual focus lenses, ignoring the existence of the two bayonet mounts.

    Minolta is the only line of cameras which has undergone a bayonet change and a brand change and that can be confusing for people who haven't been paying attention during the last 30 years.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

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