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  1. #21

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    I believe the 90 series suffered from the dreaded sticky plastic problem like the 80's. You might want to watch out for that.

    The N80 while being a hell of a camera for the price won't meter with older non cpu lenses; The bs downfall of the series. That and being superseded in months by the 90 series. Thank you Nikon! I'm getting my older lenses serviced to even fit on the body (I also carry a FTN and shoot non ai's) as I like the 80 body for it's abilities and you can replace them for squat if they get damaged or stolen(?) HA. Btw they take the MB16 grip for AA's.

    If I had it to do all over again years ago, I might have stayed with Pentax after my Spotmatic F. I've tested only a handful of lenses, some Nikon, some Pentax, some FD Canon and a couple of odd's and ends, and the (older) Pentax had a signature that I liked and were plenty sharp with very gradual drop off's over the range. Maybe someone else can speak to this comparison (or others, Minolta, Canon etc) with greater insight and experience. The mid-range AF Nikon's I have or had, have just not impressed me all that much at the "new" price. An example would be the F1.8 50's in the N series being good, but I don't see that in the later D series and I haven't shot the 1.4's. Personally I don't see paying more for a 1.4 unless it freaking performs at 1.4. The best Nikon I had was the AF F2.8 80-200, with alot of weight at a big price. Basically you get what you pay for.

    Picking bodies come down to holding them in hand. If you have good Nikon lenses I believe your best bet is the F100 or F5. Then again Nikon has a habit of pissing off their followers over and over again so maybe you'll want to rethink your hitching you wagon to their star.
    W.A. Crider

  2. #22

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    I'd say it comes down to why you want to shoot film.

    For me, the appeal is being able to use gorgeously made old cameras (and being able to replace them for pennies if needed). My favoured bodies won't use the latest Pentax lenses as they lack an aperture ring, so I also have a few '80s 35mm bodies as that way I can use an FA-J 18-35mm to get a non-fisheye 18mm lens.

    If being able to use your existing lenses is important then you will need to pick a body which can set the aperture. However, this won't handle like the K1000 and will probably feel much like using your DSLR.

    If you liked the K1000 then look at a KX or K2. The KX is basically a K1000 with a few upgrades - you get a self timer, shutter speed and aperture are displayed in the viewfinder, you also get mirror lockup and DOF preview.

    The K2 looks and feels similar but has an electronic metal shutter and Av mode. You don't get the viewfinder aperture display (unless you find a K2 DMD) but it'll meter and shoot exposures from 1/1000 to 8 seconds on auto or manual mode. Flash sync is 1/125 rather than the 1/60 of the KX/K1000 and the speeds from 1/1000 down to 1/125 and B will work without batteries.

    You could of course just buy an LX but those tend to cost a lot more!
    Matt

  3. #23

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    PentaxBronica: My life in film is the most fun part of my photography. I have spent countless hrs using my film for just basic processing but Bromoil, Solarization, Cyanotypes, etc.(and I'll more than likely add to this list as I age) are the way I love to go with film. I enjoy using the film a lot more than the digital counterpart and I had decided a long time ago to keep bw to just film and my color works to digital (easier to work with using a comp through Lightroom and Photoshop). As I do more freelance works, I know my digital side will have to improve but for now I want to get set up for the long haul in film. I take my film works more seriously and tend to be more adventurous than the digital side.

    The more I look into these cameras I believe that I will buy a whole lineup of lenses for the film camera. But I like knowing that I can use my digital lenses on the camera if the need be.
    Last edited by joshua029; 12-23-2012 at 03:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #24
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    The N90s is a great camera. No ifs, ands, or buts.

    Find a nice one that is in good repair and enjoy it.

    The next step up is an F100 at 2 to 3 times the price.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #25
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    lots of great ideas already presented. for Me I have all the cameras mentioned and all of them would be a great fit. I love the F4, it would meet all your needs but I'm getting la little tired of the weight of it with the 4s battery pack (the 6AA one). If you can find one with the 4AA pack get it (the problem is that the battery pack sells for about the same price as the camera!). The N80 is the camera I am shooting the most with recently. The small size, light weight, great meter and full use of G lenses is the reason. forget the battery issue. Either get the $20 AA grip or do what i did and buy a 20 pack of the A123 for $20 and shoot over 600 rolls, almost $5000 worth of velvia at the going rates before you need to buy more batteries.. The more I use the N90 the less I like it. Its ergonomics are nothing like any nikon I have used or will use. just has a funky layout and operational way about it. It works for other of course but for me I find that I have to spend a little too much time thinking about operating the camera and not shooting and composing. But it does give great results!

    Get an N80. they are all over craigslist for under $50. then at least you can hold it and play with it before you buy it. it along with the F100 are the most like today's digital cameras. If you like the more manual style go with the the F4

  6. #26

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    Lots of great suggestions and I have been throught the same thing as you....here's my two cents. Tried the N80, great camera but thought I needed something better (which I didn't)....so got the N90, heavy and sturdy camera for not being a pro model. Great choice as pretty much everyone has said particularly if you are on a budget. Around the same time I got an F4S which is a wonderful camera, but the N90 was much faster AF, but as said, expandability is greater for F4. For grins (and because they were SO cheap) got a N75. It is so light wieght that it is amazing and takes all the new modern "G" lenses too. Final and last film purchase was my F5. Glad I did too. It has fast autofocus, all the abilities I will ever be able to use or grow into and it was about the same or less that I spent on my F4S some 4 years ago.

    Bottom line for me is there is no big wrong choice here to make. I think you can see that from everyone's remarks. I would recommend if you have the cash get the F5 or look for a pristine N90 and you will NOT be dissappointed by either purchase. Film bodies are almost at a giveaway pricepoint anymore. Get them while the getting is good!!

    Bob E.
    Nikon F5, Nikon F4S, Nikon FA, Nikon FE, Nikon N90, Nikon N80, Nikon N75, Mamiya 645 Pro, Mamiya Press Super 23, Yashica Lynx 14e, Yashica Electro GSN, Yashica 124G, Yashica D

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