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Thread: A sign of hope

  1. #21
    flatulent1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhmimac View Post
    "not interested in their materials on a technical level. It's something I admire and wish I could do sometimes."

    Oh yes... i wish a rewind in time.. and then : one camera/one lens and just push that button and no bloody GAS ;-)

    Bloody gas... Sounds like you need to see a specialist.

    Fred Latchaw
    Seattle WA


    I am beginning to resent being referred to as 'half-fast'.
    Whatever that's supposed to mean.

  2. #22

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    You know just because you see someone using a film camera doesn't mean they want to sit there and talk with a complete stranger (and let's face it, usually an old fart) about cameras. Every now and then while I'm out shooting with my friends or family some old geezer will stop by and say "hey nice camera" (usually when I carry the Hasselblad). So I'll say "hey thanks, good day to you sir" and usually that's that. Sometimes a few more words will be exchanged and I might even let the person fondle the camera a bit or look down the finder which is usually followed by a very long "oooooohhhhh".

    But sometimes someone will say "ohhh is that a 50/80/150/whatever lens on it" and I'll say "yeah..." and then they'll go on about some old story about how they had one or always wanted one or their friend who worked for Time magazine or whatever had one or this and that and you know what, I really do not care because I am out with my friends and my wife and the kids and whoever else and I just don't want to talk cameras, I just want to have a good time and use the camera rather than talk about it. So after ending up in this situation a few times I now just try to end the conversation as quickly as possible.

    So maybe the 17 year old just didn't want to talk to some random guy so don't be too quick to judge. Just sayin'...
    Hasselblad 501CM, Mamiya RB67SD, Rollei 6003SRC, Nikonos V, Canon EOS 3

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by film_man View Post
    You know just because you see someone using a film camera doesn't mean they want to sit there and talk with a complete stranger (and let's face it, usually an old fart) about cameras. Every now and then while I'm out shooting with my friends or family some old geezer will stop by and say "hey nice camera" (usually when I carry the Hasselblad). So I'll say "hey thanks, good day to you sir" and usually that's that. Sometimes a few more words will be exchanged and I might even let the person fondle the camera a bit or look down the finder which is usually followed by a very long "oooooohhhhh".

    But sometimes someone will say "ohhh is that a 50/80/150/whatever lens on it" and I'll say "yeah..." and then they'll go on about some old story about how they had one or always wanted one or their friend who worked for Time magazine or whatever had one or this and that and you know what, I really do not care because I am out with my friends and my wife and the kids and whoever else and I just don't want to talk cameras, I just want to have a good time and use the camera rather than talk about it. So after ending up in this situation a few times I now just try to end the conversation as quickly as possible.

    So maybe the 17 year old just didn't want to talk to some random guy so don't be too quick to judge. Just sayin'...
    Your observation is true for the most part: It usually is one of the over-40 crowd that recognizes a film camera...and then proceeds to give a lengthy discourse on his/her own experiences...the virtues of various films...their favourite camera(s)... In my experience, however, there are a couple of exceptions to the "generational divide." Folks seem always to be intrigued by my Hasselblads (always asking questions about the thing and wanting to look through the viewfinder), and always stop for a look-see if I have a motor-driven F2 out. In the case of the former, part of the interest may no doubt stem from its unusual appearance; in the case of the latter I would hedge a bet that it is either its well-beaten appearance or the fact that the sound of the motor-drive is enough to disturb the wildlife...
    An assortment of F-series Nikons (F to F6, excluding the F4) with quite a few Nikkors, a pair of M6s with some Leitz glass, a pair of 500c/ms with a wide range of Zeiss optics and, just to help keep Duracell solvent, a D800.

    Favourite films: (1). KE ("Kodachrome Era"): 35mm: PKM25 and PKR64, HP5/Tri-X; 120: PKR64, PanF, FP4. (2). PKE ("Post-Kodachrome Era"): (a) 35mm: E100G, HP5 Plus/Tri-X and Delta 3200; (b) 120: E100G, PanF Plus, FP4 Plus, TMax 100.

  4. #24

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    When I was young and in school I worked part-time in the cameras and sporting goods department of a department/discount store. Every Wednesday we gave a 10% discount to the senior citizens. We would pack them in and sometimes it seemed like every one of them wanted to talk about something. It was hard because there were people in line behind them in a hurry to get waited on.

    There are a lot of lonely people out there.

  5. #25
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    A sign of hope

    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    I have to disagree with you there! All of the Leica owners I know, although some are snooty, know how to use their cameras well. That is one thing about Leica shooters that they might not take good pictures but they know how to use their cameras well. It's the D users crowd that although might got some very good pictures don't know how their cameras work.
    I just have to play devils advocate here...

    You say they "know how to use their camera" but yet talk about the pictures being not so good... Which to me at least is my first clue...

    Leica shooters who don't take good pictures... Are Leica shooters who don't know how to use their cameras...

    Just sayin'

    So I agree with the first poster, the Leica shooter who has money and technical knowledge isn't the Leica shooter who knows how to use their camera... Hehe


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I just have to play devils advocate here...

    You say they "know how to use their camera" but yet talk about the pictures being not so good... Which to me at least is my first clue...

    Leica shooters who don't take good pictures... Are Leica shooters who don't know how to use their cameras...

    Just sayin'

    So I agree with the first poster, the Leica shooter who has money and technical knowledge isn't the Leica shooter who knows how to use their camera... Hehe
    Well, I think the intention was about owners who know "how to use" their cameras in the technical sense---which knob does what and so on---but don't know how to produce a good image.

    Surely almost all of us have been through that stage at some point, right? As a kid, if you told me to take a picture of something specific, I could meter and set the camera (all manual!) and focus and get a technically competent photo, but I didn't know thing one about composition or intelligent use of lighting. I may now be a little bit past that, but my technical "how to use the tool" abilities are still far in excess of my artistic ones, and probably always will be.

    I envy the exceptions, the people who come to photography with a really strong, developed sense of what makes a strong image, for whom the hard part is just learning how to control a tool to match their vision. But maybe that's a "grass is always greener" thing and they envy me too for the opposite reasons.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  7. #27
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    A sign of hope

    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    Well, I think the intention was about owners who know "how to use" their cameras in the technical sense---which knob does what and so on---but don't know how to produce a good image.

    Surely almost all of us have been through that stage at some point, right? As a kid, if you told me to take a picture of something specific, I could meter and set the camera (all manual!) and focus and get a technically competent photo, but I didn't know thing one about composition or intelligent use of lighting. I may now be a little bit past that, but my technical "how to use the tool" abilities are still far in excess of my artistic ones, and probably always will be.

    I envy the exceptions, the people who come to photography with a really strong, developed sense of what makes a strong image, for whom the hard part is just learning how to control a tool to match their vision. But maybe that's a "grass is always greener" thing and they envy me too for the opposite reasons.

    -NT
    True, I'm being a pain, but I guess it comes down to who makes the $ haha


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    It's the D users crowd that although might got some very good pictures don't know how their cameras work.
    I don't know if this anecdote is appropriate for this forum, but as others have responded to this quote with a "why does it matter if the pictures come out OK" attitude perhaps an example will illustrate.

    Over the holidays I was back in Pittsburgh visiting family and we attended the memorial service held under one of the bridges in downtown for the homeless who had died that year. This was about 7pm; there was a variety of city lights but it was still quite dark under the bridge. One woman had pushed her way to the front of the crowd and had what appeared to be a full frame Canon d*%#!@l (the one that looks like it has an autowinder attached) and a long, slow zoom lens with the ubiquitous hood. She snapped a couple shots with no flash, then had to see the dark screen before having an inkling that anything was amiss. She then added a bounce flash which she pointed straight up (!) and proceeded to click away, occasionally rechecking the screen but never trying to aim the flash, or having any concept of the backlighting from the street lamps, etc.

    This woman's clownish and intrusive behavior was entirely inappropriate given the solemnity of the event. Granted, others were using flashes and video lights, but she was the only one with an obvious sense of entitlement to shove a huge lens in the face of folks holding a memorial service, and constantly disrupt the scene with flashes illuminating the underside of the bridge. After the service was over, I noticed that she had a second camera around her neck (it appeared to be the same model). So she had probably $20,000 of camera equipment just on her person, but she didn't have a clue as to selecting the proper lens, setting the ISO or even how to use a flash!

    So in answer to the "what does it matter" question, it matters because there is a lot more to taking a photograph than just clicking away and hoping something comes out OK. A photographer should know what equipment to use and how to use it appropriately for a given circumstance, rather than detracting from the event they are trying to record. This is never more clearly illustrated than with folks who spend far too much for a camera and believe that they are suddenly a photographer.

    By the by, I had thought about loading a roll of Provia 400 into my OM-4t and trying to push it three stops, but decided that even that would be inappropriate under the circumstances.

  9. #29

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    When I worked in a camera store in the late 50's and early 60's a standing joke was when someone came in and wanted 'the best camera' (usually a lawyer or doctor), sell them a Leica set at 1/250 sec an f:8 and the hyperfocus distance. They could then walk around with expensive 'neck candy'.

  10. #30
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    A sign of hope

    Quote Originally Posted by thuggins View Post
    I don't know if this anecdote is appropriate for this forum, but as others have responded to this quote with a "why does it matter if the pictures come out OK" attitude perhaps an example will illustrate.

    Over the holidays I was back in Pittsburgh visiting family and we attended the memorial service held under one of the bridges in downtown for the homeless who had died that year. This was about 7pm; there was a variety of city lights but it was still quite dark under the bridge. One woman had pushed her way to the front of the crowd and had what appeared to be a full frame Canon d*%#!@l (the one that looks like it has an autowinder attached) and a long, slow zoom lens with the ubiquitous hood. She snapped a couple shots with no flash, then had to see the dark screen before having an inkling that anything was amiss. She then added a bounce flash which she pointed straight up (!) and proceeded to click away, occasionally rechecking the screen but never trying to aim the flash, or having any concept of the backlighting from the street lamps, etc.

    This woman's clownish and intrusive behavior was entirely inappropriate given the solemnity of the event. Granted, others were using flashes and video lights, but she was the only one with an obvious sense of entitlement to shove a huge lens in the face of folks holding a memorial service, and constantly disrupt the scene with flashes illuminating the underside of the bridge. After the service was over, I noticed that she had a second camera around her neck (it appeared to be the same model). So she had probably $20,000 of camera equipment just on her person, but she didn't have a clue as to selecting the proper lens, setting the ISO or even how to use a flash!

    So in answer to the "what does it matter" question, it matters because there is a lot more to taking a photograph than just clicking away and hoping something comes out OK. A photographer should know what equipment to use and how to use it appropriately for a given circumstance, rather than detracting from the event they are trying to record. This is never more clearly illustrated than with folks who spend far too much for a camera and believe that they are suddenly a photographer.

    By the by, I had thought about loading a roll of Provia 400 into my OM-4t and trying to push it three stops, but decided that even that would be inappropriate under the circumstances.
    I would clearly have said something to her, if nothing else about the flash...and said "please turn your flash off this is a solemn service and you are being disrespectful" if she said something about needing the flash then I would have said "please come back when you have learned how to use your camera, you don't need a flash you just don't know what you are doing" I can get really ornery at important events. Imagine how I'll be in my old age!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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