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Thread: Minolta x 700

  1. #21
    Matthew Wagg's Avatar
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    Recommendations are tough for all the reasons the posters above have said. What I'd do now is type in a film name into Flickr's search and it'll come back with results from them.

    I'd stay away from reversal film to begin with as its a bit tougher to learn than colour negative films. Black and white, if that's your bag, all you need to do is ask if you the same, flickr will give you hundreds of results.

    I'd guess you're not heading into processing the films yourself yet but when you do you can use the Flickr search with the developer type to get an idea of what the film and developer will look like together.

    If you're not sure what's out there, look on Kodak's site, Fuji, Ilford, Foma, Adox, and so on.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    Buy cheap colour film from a local store to practice on. This is your first go with film, no need to buy anything expensive or exotic. Get it developed and check to see the camera is working and that you know how to work it!
    I would have to disagree. Most "cheap" films I've come across suffer from color shifts and some come scratched..

    Go to http://www.freestylephoto.biz/index.php?sc=23017 for good film..

    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    Later, when you're confident, choose one film and stick with it. Learn to develop yourself and have fun!
    Again I would have to disagree. You should use different films for different situations as well as using both color and b&w films..
    Leicarfcam aka Colyn

  3. #23

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    By cheap I don't mean substandard. Superia and Gold are cheap and are very good films.
    Steve.

  4. #24

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    IMO, Kodak Gold 100 at about $2 for a roll of 36exp is an exceptional value and a very good all around film.

  5. #25

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    If you want to use B&W I would say either Ilford HP5 or FP4 (400 or 125 ASA respectively). I've tried Delta 400 and it never seems to work as well for me, HP5 gives me crisp low-grain negatives and is very easy to develop at home - just follow the instructions on the film and the chemicals and you can't really go wrong. If you can make instant noodles then you can develop a film.

    I also like Pan F and SFX but those are a bit more specialist - Pan F is very high resolution but also rather slow, SFX is a bit of a trick film - use it with an infra-red filter and it becomes a quasi IR film. I will be trying a plain red filter on HP5 when the weather improves a bit as I suspect it might produce a similar look, probably not as pronounced but it should turn foliage white.

    I also use Delta 3200 occasionally but I find it needs more post production work - HP5 negatives look perfect as they come out of the tank but the Delta 3200 needs a bit of adjustment to get the contrast right. I view it as a good solution to parties - it means you don't need flash, and everyone looks classier in monochrome.
    Matt

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur2 View Post
    very useful
    @Matthew Wagg does the combination of film and camera brings different results?
    I mean taking a picture with tmax 400 with my minolta and the same picture again with tmax400 and olympus om2 does it brings the same results?
    i think there will be difference,so i have to see sample images of my camera with the film i wanna test!

  7. #27

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    Technically speaking, same film on two different bodies with the same field of view lenses, same apertures in the same lighting condition should provide the same exposure.

    Of course, what developer you use with your TMAX400 will affect the results too.

  8. #28
    tantrikelo's Avatar
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    if i am saying well it is better to develop the films on your own,as you can prosses them as you like.This is something that i don't have a clue how it is done,but i think i will try to learn in the future!
    As far, from images i have seen around the net, ilford 400,neopan 400,ilforn hp5 are some films that suits my taste.For color film i thin kodak gold it is nice, fuji superia 400 and i think kodak ektar....
    guess i must try all of them to be sure

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Les Sarile View Post
    IMO, Kodak Gold 100 at about $2 for a roll of 36exp is an exceptional value and a very good all around film.
    I agree, it's good stuff. I bought a couple hundred rolls this past year to stock up. Get it while (if) you can. Kodak no longer makes it.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  10. #30

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    Processing b&w is so easy and likely much cheaper and certainly subject to all the controls you want. For instance you can use TMAX100 as ISO100 and I have seen it used up to ISO1600 - push processing. You can of course have labs push process for you too.

    What you most likely will have to get used to is the metering of the X-700 or other cameras of the era. The huge latitude of most all C41 and b&w films is most forgiving particularly on the overexposure side. If you don't process your own b&w, perhaps you should consider using chromogenic film - b&w film that is processed like regular C41 film, like Kodak BW400CN and others.

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