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  1. #1

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    I was recently gifted 88 rolls of 135.

    A family friend just gave me his stash of film, as he's switched to digital. All of it is expired, but has been in freezer storage for its whole life.

    I have read that I should try cross-processing the expired slide film. Is this a waste?

    Are there any general tips for shooting expired film? I would assume that it is now probably slower than its box rating, is this something I should try to compensate for?

    Here's a hastily constructed spreadsheet of what I've got. I was typing as I went through the box, so it isn't well organized.


  2. #2
    ArtO's Avatar
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    WOW! What a haul.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Art

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by ArtO View Post
    WOW! What a haul.
    It's sure a shame that most of it is Kodak Max...I'll save it for my Canon MC

  4. #4
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by powasky View Post
    I have read that I should try cross-processing the expired slide film. Is this a waste?
    It is if you don't like the cross processed look.

    I would try some out normally. It's probably fine.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  5. #5
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    I have a stash of Kodak royal gold (ISO1000) of the same vintage of which you have one roll. I have been exposing at 400 and have been happy with results. I have processed both C41 and in Caffenol. Be ready for grain...
    Cheers - Andy C
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    16mm Cine, 35mm, 120, 5x4 & 7x5.

  6. #6
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    For the stuff in the 90s give about one stop more (especially the color Max). The other stuff is probably just as old. Try that and if overexposed, adjust accordingly. I say this ONLY because of the favorable storage in cold.

    Note: the slide film can be processed as C-41 yielding an actual, normal negative with orange mask. I have done this many times. - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 01-03-2013 at 03:23 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7

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    Oxley-

    Are you treating it as 400 when you develop?

    David-

    Thanks for the exposure tips. If I'm cross-processing Velvia 50, do I treat it just like I would any 50ISO color neg film?

  8. #8

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    For the stuff which expired in 04 I'd just try shooting and developing a roll as normal.

    I had a roll of generic colour negative film of similar vintage which I finally got around to using last year, aside from the colours being a bit muted (which might have been a characteristic of the film and not age-related) it was absolutely fine. It hadn't been stored particularly carefully other than keeping it out of direct sunlight or extremes of temperature.

    Personally I wouldn't cross-process slide film, it's getting hard to find. Just get it developed normally and either scan it or buy a projector, you can find good quality ones for not a lot of money now.
    Matt

  9. #9
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    I've found frozen film to shoot perfectly normally despite expiry, maybe slight speed loss but still shootable at box speed
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
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    As you probably know, there is no longer any practical way to process the Kodachrome and obtain colour slides.

    You can use it for black and white, but it probably isn't worth it.

    Other than that, congratulations.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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