Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,693   Posts: 1,482,438   Online: 897
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    360
    Leave it alone. Let it age gracefully.

  2. #22
    Nikon Collector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Carolina Beach, NC
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    162

    EGO

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Any paint that would be durable enough for constant use would probably have to be baked on. Really not practical. Professional photographers look upon such wear as a badge of honor. Cameras are for taking pictures not to look pretty.
    LOL I remember getting a new F3 and rubbing it with wet sand to avoid the "rookie" ribbing I would get from the other photographers

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,498
    Quote Originally Posted by Kiron Kid View Post
    Leave it alone. Let it age gracefully.
    I agree. I hate scratches on my cameras, particularly if it's through my carelessness, but normal brassing on the edges is no prob. I have a set of binoculars used in WW2 by a now-deceased relative, which carry all the marks of action, and could no doubt tell a lot of exciting tales!

  4. #24
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,835
    Images
    57
    Brass is class.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,151
    Black paint is the least durable of camera finishes, and, back when these cameras were new, you paid a premium for it! This is why pristine black "vintage" cameras are worth a premium, now. Every wannabe pro with a few extra dollars bought one.
    To renew the finish, take the camera apart and begin by stripping the paint off all painted parts. Get your tiny planishing hammer and miniature dolly and repair all the dents and bruises. Dents which can't be raised and roughness from abrasions can be leaded. Spray a coat of primer, bake at about 140f, and rub out any flaws. Spray, bake, and rub a second coat. If this coat is flawless, you can spray and bake a couple finish coats of black. Fill any lettering with the appropriate color lacquer stick and reassemble the camera. Then, never use it because with very little use it will brass all over again.

    Or, you can just live with the honorable scars of several decades use. Personally I stick with chrome cameras.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    172
    This is Don McCullin's camera, hes a war photography, his Nikon F stopped a bullet from killing him, I think it still works, it doesn't really matter what the camera looks like as long as it is still able to take a photo


  7. #27

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    655
    Quote Originally Posted by Nikon Collector View Post
    LOL I remember getting a new F3 and rubbing it with wet sand to avoid the "rookie" ribbing I would get from the other photographers
    I admire your honesty in admitting that.

    s-a
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

  8. #28
    agnosticnikon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Mississippi mud
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    102
    Quote Originally Posted by m1tch View Post
    This is Don McCullin's camera, hes a war photography, his Nikon F stopped a bullet from killing him, I think it still works, it doesn't really matter what the camera looks like as long as it is still able to take a photo

    WOW!! That is a great camera photo of a great camera. I love cameras with some history, and it doesn't get much better than this.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    172
    Went downhill when they started making things of plastic lol i'm pretty sure my 70 year old Bessa and 100 year old Zeiss London lens will outlast most modern DSLRs and still work fine.

  10. #30
    fmajor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    259
    Quote Originally Posted by m1tch View Post
    Went downhill when they started making things of plastic lol i'm pretty sure my 70 year old Bessa and 100 year old Zeiss London lens will outlast most modern DSLRs and still work fine.
    I agree!!! I love my Minolta Autocord from 1956. I'm only hoping to have a continuous supply of the replacement "sensors" - especially the Fuji Acros 100 version.


    EDIT: Ooops - i forgot this was the 35mm Forum. CORRECTION: I love my Minolta SRT202 and awesome Rokkor lenses. The rest about replacement "sensors" applies.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin