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  1. #11
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    The F100 is the only in camera meter I will use. For everything else I use a spot meter.
    There is however a learning curve with using a meter.
    You have to learn to think like a meter...

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    The F100 is the only in camera meter I will use. For everything else I use a spot meter.
    There is however a learning curve with using a meter.
    You have to learn to think like a meter...
    How would you think like a Nikon matrix meter?

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by mablo View Post
    I noticed the matrix metering problem with F100 and b&w films several years ago. I tried to raise the issue but people wouldn't notice or told me to fiddle with ISO values. This is nonsense if you know how matrix works. My theory is the matrix exposure scenes were adjusted for shooting chromes. Remember, everyone was shooting chromes when F100 came out. It all makes sort of sense if you think of how to expose for the chromes versus exposing for b&w. You will get underexposed shots for b&w in situations where contrast is wide (bright sky, dark woods for example). The only good cure is to use weighted average for exposure. I've never had exposure problems since I switched to weighted average.
    I don't have an F100 but I do have an F5. I do a lot of test with the F5 matrix metering and sending it back to Nikon for calibration twice. My take on the Nikon matrix is this.
    With flat lighting and a low contrast scene, it's fine and read the same as center weighted.
    With high contrast lighting it bias toward the highlight. It seemed that it try to determine the highlight that is important (fairly large, at the focus point etc..) and try to keep that high light from burning out and that's about 2 stops above middle gray or so.

    With that it works great with slide film and also with digital. But I shoot mostly color negative film and B&W film is about the same so the matrix meter would be underexposing in such a situation. Biasing the exposure by putting a + compensation or changing the ISO wouldn't work because in a flat scene it would over expose.

  4. #14

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    Can I ask what is the evidence for the matrix metering of the F5 and F100 being designed for chromes? I'd have thought that when both these cameras came out, chrome sales were already declining and most users were shooting B&W and colour neg.

    What Chan Tran has said seems to render the very extensive matrix memory of the F100 and the F5 almost useless or certainly seriously defective for users of B&W and colour neg as exposure compensation will not rectify the situation.


    pentaxuser

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Can I ask what is the evidence for the matrix metering of the F5 and F100 being designed for chromes? I'd have thought that when both these cameras came out, chrome sales were already declining and most users were shooting B&W and colour neg.

    What Chan Tran has said seems to render the very extensive matrix memory of the F100 and the F5 almost useless or certainly seriously defective for users of B&W and colour neg as exposure compensation will not rectify the situation.


    pentaxuser
    There is nothing from Nikon as to the matrix metering system is designed for. So that I had to send my camera back to Nikon for calibration because I thought it was bad calibration. But twice it came back the same. My film test showed the results. No publication details how the matrix is supposed to work and thus my question how to think like one. I know that it gave me many underexposure for color negative film (and I assume it would be similar for B&W). It's to the point that after 2 years of trying I don't use it any more. Film test on slides gave excellent results sometimes to my surprise because I wouldn't think of exposing it that way if I were to use a spot meter. Only when I got the slides back they looked good but not to my intention. Using the F5 matrix meter to determine exposure for my coolpix also gave good results.

  6. #16

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    F100 and B/W film

    I have had under-exposed results for negative materials with both F100 and F80 cameras using matrix metering. I had concluded that it was aimed at transparencies. Lowering film speed should correct the problem.

  7. #17

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    This is not to deny both Alex' and Chan Tran's experiences but I suppose the only way to reach a meaningful conclusion would be to get all the F5 and F100 users here on APUG and probably elsewhere to give their experience of underexposures to reach a statistically significant conclusion.

    It just seems to me that if this was a feature of both cameras then an awful lot of users should be complaining in forums and complaining to Nikon and maybe affecting sales of both models. I have seen a number of threads on both cameras and I can't recall seeing many complaints of this nature.

    On the issue of correcting the underexposure I'd have thought as Alex says that lowering film speed would correct the problem. If the problem can be rectified via a spot meter for instance or an incident meter in the right circumstances then isn't this in effect the equivalent of lowering the film speed i.e the F5 user overrides the matrix and the camera does what it is told and produces a correctly exposed neg.

    It cannot do otherwise

    pentaxuser

  8. #18

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    F100 and B/W film

    Nikon doesn't recommend use of exposure compensation with matrix metering. I'm sure this information is given in the camera manuals. Altering the film speed to a lower value, however, will cause the meter to give more exposure throughout the film. This should solve the problem whether it is a problem with calibration, a peculiarity of this camera or the particular film you are using. Keep in mind the advice already given that many B&W films give better results with a lower than stated ASA value.

  9. #19

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    When I aim my camera to an evenly lighted and of neutral color surface with the surface fills the entire frame,the spot, center weighted and matrix meter read the same and also the same as my 2 hand held meters and one is a spot meter and the other is a 40 degree reflective.
    Only when aiming at a scene that has bright/dark areas then the meter readings are different.

  10. #20
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    For fast point-and-shoot pictures matrix metering is good enough but not 100 % accurate. For elaborate controlled pictures spot metering should be used and film tests should be done before spending film on big projects. I'm very happy with my F100 but I never use matrix metering, not even for slides.
    Mihai Costea

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    Than meets the eye." - Neil Young

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