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  1. #11
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    My first Canon ever: an AE-1 with 50/1.8 and 28/2.8 ;-) What do you think??

    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    Half the AE-1s in the world have a piece of electrical tape over the battery compartment. To me that's how they're supposed to look.

    I prefer aperture priority personally, but with this camera in practice, twiddling the speed dial while watching the needle is quick enough for most situations.

    -NT
    I broke mine opening it but managed to super glue the pieces together and thus far it hasn't broken ... Again.. Lol


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  2. #12

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    This was my starter camera back in 1977. It is a great camera for learning as it is not auto-everything. The photographer actually has to think. I still have mine and use it from time to time. I am now a Nikon man, however, as I never got used to the EOS line from Canon.

    I also shoot a Mamiya 7. It reminds me of the Canon in that the shutter speed dial and the aperture rings are in the same locations on the camera. Adjusting the dials just seems natural after shooting the Canon for years.

    When I take the Canon off the shelf and shoot with it, it is like shaking hands with an old friend.

  3. #13
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Friday View Post
    This was my starter camera back in 1977. It is a great camera for learning as it is not auto-everything. The photographer actually has to think. I still have mine and use it from time to time. I am now a Nikon man, however, as I never got used to the EOS line from Canon.

    I also shoot a Mamiya 7. It reminds me of the Canon in that the shutter speed dial and the aperture rings are in the same locations on the camera. Adjusting the dials just seems natural after shooting the Canon for years.

    When I take the Canon off the shelf and shoot with it, it is like shaking hands with an old friend.
    OMG I never realized that! You're right they are the same! No wonder I like the Mamiya 7 so much! haha

  4. #14
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Hi guys,
    You have me worried ......
    The battery is still working but not for long. And having to break off the door of the battery compartment doesn't sound appealing.
    The instruction manual says "Open the battery chamber cover using the viewfinder cover". Sounds like an accident waiting.
    So, what is the best way without braking of the cover?
    (Didn't have these problems with my old Nikon EL2, though).
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  5. #15
    AgX
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    The battery compartment door has a tiny lock that has to be pushed aside to enable opening that door.

    As a tool to do so Canon added a tiny cam to that plastic plate which is supplied with the camera to shield the viewfinder window in case it will not be covered by the photographer whilst exposing (to avoid stray light entering the meter).

    This shield is typiccally missing with used cameras.

    I never ever used that shield for opening that door, but just my (short) fingernail. The door opens most easily. It is the first time I learn about broken doors and this all is enigmatic to me.

  6. #16
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    It opens really easy with the viewfinder cover as a leaver. The small button to push is a "hook" to push aside (towards the lens, not into the body). I can imagine that if you don't know this and try to pull the door open, it will brake off easily. It's made of the kind of plastic that isn't flexible.
    My viewfinder cover was still present ;-) and I did have the manual, but if you don't have both, it is likely to go wrong.
    Here is a copy of the manual (click to enlarge):
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by TheToadMen; 02-23-2013 at 05:05 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  7. #17
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    My first Canon ever: an AE-1 with 50/1.8 and 28/2.8 ;-) What do you think??

    Just do it gently, it has a spring so once the lock is released by you fingernail it will open itself. Don't worry too much, just don't cut your nails for a few days


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #18
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    My first Canon ever: an AE-1 with 50/1.8 and 28/2.8 ;-) What do you think??

    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    It opens really easy with the viewfinder cover as a leaver. The small button to push is a "hook" to push aside (towards the lens, not into the body). I can imagine that if you don't know this and try to pull the door open, it will brake off easily. It's made of the kind of plastic that isn't flexible.
    My viewfinder cover was still present ;-) and I did have the manual, but if you don't have both, it is likely to go wrong.
    Here is a copy of the manual (click to enlarge):
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	canon-AE1-battery-door.JPG 
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Size:	172.1 KB 
ID:	64644
    Ya know it's funny I have that hot shoe cover, I always thought it was from something else since I never knew that tab in the front was for the battery door haha, it always looked like it didn't belong to that camera as the tab sticks out in the hot shoe and doesn't fit properly as I would think anyway.

    Thanks now I know I have the right thing haha


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #19
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Hi Stone,
    Now you know in what model to cut your finger nails ;-)
    But seriously. I think Canon made this too complicated. If you don't have the manual (or didn't read it in time) there is no way to figure out this combination. How many people threw away that "plastic hotshoe fill-up thing", thinking it had no use? Or thus breaking open/off the battery door, not knowing the right tool was right in front of them all the time? Or even unscrewing the motorwind disk in the bottom, without finding any battery?
    I call it a wrong solution for correcting a "design flaw". Not the best example of Japanese engineering .....

    Well: I got me a new battery today and will load the camera with a test film to see what it is up to. Will it perform better than my old Nikon EL2? We'll see.

    BTW: the manual for the Canon AE-1 can be downloaded here: http://www.butkus.org/chinon/canon/c...canon_ae-1.htm

    BTW2: Nikon was also good in hiding the battery in those days. You'll find it in my EL2 behind the mirror (take off lens, flip up mirror, open small door inside the body).
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  10. #20
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    But seriously. I think Canon made this too complicated. If you don't have the manual (or didn't read it in time) there is no way to figure out this combination. How many people threw away that "plastic hotshoe fill-up thing", thinking it had no use? Or thus breaking open/off the battery door, not knowing the right tool was right in front of them all the time?
    As said, I don't find it complicated. And to be fair: How often does one need to open that little door (I leave aside very cold conditions)? What about all those more recent cameras that necessitate a point of a pen, match, tooth-pick or alike just to have the film rewound. Not always is the apt tool bound (via carrying strap) to the camera.

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