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  1. #21
    airgunr's Avatar
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    My first "real" camera was an AE-1. I traveled all over the world with it with very good results. As is the case for most any camera it is the glass you put on it that has the most impact on quality of your images. It is a very good camera for a beginner and you can get very good glass for not much money as there are litterly hundreds of thousand of them out there sitll.
    WJS/wi/usa

  2. #22
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Hi Airgunr,
    I agree: the camera itself is only a black box. But what is considered to be good glass (single focus length) for the AE-1?
    (Don't forget: I'm an ignorent Nikon user)
    Bert
    Last edited by TheToadMen; 02-23-2013 at 04:12 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  3. #23
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    My first Canon ever: an AE-1 with 50/1.8 and 28/2.8 ;-) What do you think??

    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    Hi Stone,
    Now you know in what model to cut your finger nails ;-)
    But seriously. I think Canon made this too complicated. If you don't have the manual (or didn't read it in time) there is no way to figure out this combination. How many people threw away that "plastic hotshoe fill-up thing", thinking it had no use? Or thus breaking open/off the battery door, not knowing the right tool was right in front of them all the time? Or even unscrewing the motorwind disk in the bottom, without finding any battery?
    I call it a wrong solution for correcting a "design flaw". Not the best example of Japanese engineering .....

    Well: I got me a new battery today and will load the camera with a test film to see what it is up to. Will it perform better than my old Nikon EL2? We'll see.

    BTW: the manual for the Canon AE-1 can be downloaded here: http://www.butkus.org/chinon/canon/c...canon_ae-1.htm

    BTW2: Nikon was also good in hiding the battery in those days. You'll find it in my EL2 behind the mirror (take off lens, flip up mirror, open small door inside the body).
    Canon also included a backup batter holder that attached to the camera strap. It took me 17 years to discover that this was the function, I kept it, but can't find it, I've been wanting to use it on my Mamiya as the batter size is the same I think... Anyway yea good engineering but bad too, at least they TRIED to give you a second battery which most never do.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #24
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    My first Canon ever: an AE-1 with 50/1.8 and 28/2.8 ;-) What do you think??

    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    Hi Airgunr,
    I agree: the camera itself is only a black box. But what is considered to be good glass for the AE-1?
    (Don't forget: I'm an ignorent Nikon user)
    Bert
    To be a jerk, canon GROWS their glass (some of it) which isn't glass it's a crystal, it cuts down heavily on CA, something Nikon can't do. So :-p

    However none of the basic canons have that, just the L series glass.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #25
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Hi Stone,
    I did wander what that plastic thing was for. I found it in the case. I knew it was for the strap but didn't know why (didn't read the manual again, did I?)
    And no: I don't even know what L series glass is.....
    Since I only used Nikon, I never bothered to find out what the Canon universes are like.
    I know this camera uses FD lenses, though ;-)
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  6. #26
    AgX
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    -) "FD" refers just to the bayonet in combination with the arrangement of all the actuators

    -) "FD-new" is used to distinguish between the older FD breechlock bayonet from the newer "true" bayonet-handling coupling. As indicated this is in first instance a handling/design issue. In same cases the optics are slightly different too.

    -) "L" stands for very advanced (and expensive) optical designs within Canon's different lens ranges

  7. #27
    dances_w_clouds's Avatar
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    There are plenty of battery doors available : NOT MY advertisement: http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Two-2-Battery...item2563e343ca

    As well as instructions how to do it properly.: http://www.sdcamerasolution.com/inde...e1instructions.

    So there should be NO excuse for not doing it ;o)

  8. #28
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    -) "FD" refers just to the bayonet in combination with the arrangement of all the actuators

    -) "FD-new" is used to distinguish between the older FD breechlock bayonet from the newer "true" bayonet-handling coupling. As indicated this is in first instance a handling/design issue. In same cases the optics are slightly different too.

    -) "L" stands for very advanced (and expensive) optical designs within Canon's different lens ranges
    When you say that, do you mean the difference between the lenses that attach and then sort of have a screw on lock, to the ones that have a click button lock? Both styles fit fine on my AE-1

  9. #29
    AgX
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    Yes. There are the older ones where you attach the lens and twist a breech lock and the newer ones where you attach the lens and twist the whole lens, and which is secured by that push button. Just two versions of the same bayonet locking.
    The older version could in cases need a bit more fiddling, though that breech lock is typically self-arresting and only need a further twist for tight fit.

  10. #30
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Yes. There are the older ones where you attach the lens and twist a breech lock and the newer ones where you attach the lens and twist the whole lens, and which is secured by that push button. Just two versions of the same bayonet locking.
    The older version could in cases need a bit more fiddling, though that breech lock is typically self-arresting and only need a further twist for tight fit.
    Yea, I prefer the older ones actually, I like the crew tightening at the end, it's always seemed a but more secure to me. The new lenses seem very loose on the EOS system, like there's always a little too much play, it should be snug.

    Thanks

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