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Thread: Canon EOS 1V?

  1. #11

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    Thank you again for the replies. I'm OK with a heavy camera, I'm used to carrying around a couple of them & my intention is to focus on just one body & two lenses for a while so overall weight will probably be less. I also have a Contaflex which I use when I only want to carry a small camera. I'm arranging to meet the seller next week so I can get my hands on the 1V and feel it; will make a final decision then though I think I am going to go ahead & buy it.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loulou View Post
    Thank you again for the replies. I'm OK with a heavy camera, I'm used to carrying around a couple of them & my intention is to focus on just one body & two lenses for a while so overall weight will probably be less. I also have a Contaflex which I use when I only want to carry a small camera. I'm arranging to meet the seller next week so I can get my hands on the 1V and feel it; will make a final decision then though I think I am going to go ahead & buy it.

    I'd add one final tidbit for thought.

    It's a fine camera, Canon's finest, and will faithfully serve. But at the end of the day, one fact remains: it is a 35mm camera, with all the constraints and waste of 35mm (36 exposures is way, way too much for most people now; roll interchanges are best).

    Your money could be spent on diversifying your equipment to include medium format (any number of these formats are around 400% bigger than 35mm and subsequently have sharpness to really, really impress the masses). MF will provide a learning curve far removed from the brute looks and ease of use and high level automation and fuzzy intelligence that the 1V provides on tap.
    Something to remember: We all crave to use the latest and greatest, biggest and best. But you don't need a flash camera to create beautiful photographs. A few people here on APUG create their works on cameras that can be 80 and 130 years old (LF and ULF). A lot of mine are also done on a pinhole camera. But I'm not going to convince you to change your mind, just be careful before parting with a big sum of money.

    I'm reminded: a mint condition 1V was on sale in Melbourne (near where I live) about a fortnight ago for $975 (body only); I belive it was sold last weekend. That's an extremely low price for that marque that once sold for more than $3,500 body only.
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 02-25-2013 at 11:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  3. #13
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    A few recent thoughts... I was shooting Hurricane sandy on both my 1V and my 5D mark II (Digital) both are very nice, but even 10 years later, the 1V outshines the 5D mk II in many ways, the 45 point autofocus system is just spectacular, perhaps that's not as appealing to you but the 1V is the only camera I rarely ever have to "focus and recompose" the autofocus point area is fairly wide spread even though centered like all autofocus systems, but the points just go anywhere and it's easy to navigate. Two, if has a download system where you can download the metadata of your shots to the computer (mind you windows 95 is the newest version the program supports and you need the cable) which was once invaluable when I spend a month traveling the country going through almost 100 rolls of film, not having to carry a pen or paper, all the shoot data was recorded and is now printed out on a sheet, roll number, (which it will imprint on the leader) f stop, shutter speed, date, time, film type, camera lens name and specific focal length used etc. Pretty snazzy. Finally, while shooting the hurricane, a giant wave came up on me and crashed on top of me soaking both cameras, the 5D mk II ceased working shortly after but the 1V had no harm done. I sent them both off to be cleaned by Canon and see if the 5D could be repaired. They were able to fix the 5D THANK GOODNESS ($2500 camera) and while speaking to the lady on the phone about the cleaning and what had been done, she said she hadn't seen any film cameras come in the past year, however the ONLY film camera they still had parts for was the 1V... so there's also more chance of repair for the 1V, and it's almost impervious to weather Good luck! I love mine!

  4. #14

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    Thanks for your thoughts Poisson. Thing is I really would like a good 35mm camera, both mine are now broken so this will be my primary camera and not a diversification to my collection as I don't have a collection as such. I have shot some medium format, my other half is also a keen photographer and I am lucky that he is so generous with his cameras that I can use them when I wish too. He actively encourages me to do MF. I loved most of the results I got with MF but I find it really difficult to get the results I would like to when I do my favourite photography which was the combination of my EOS 5 & my 100mm lens shooting macros. I just can't get close enough with MF, there probably is a way I just haven't figured it out yet. I also like quite blurry, mostly out of focus shots when I do macro so sharpness is not something I am looking for here. You can see what I mean here with some macros I posted on Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/louise_...306792/detail/

    What I am ultimately looking for is my workhorse camera, one that I can learn learn inside out and back to front that I can grow with. I'm not looking to change cameras again for a long time if I buy this, I wouldn't even be looking for one if my 5 hadn't broken. But I do want to make a sound investment in a camera that will challenge me and will continue to work for a long time to come.



    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    I'd add one final tidbit for thought.

    It's a fine camera, Canon's finest, and will faithfully serve. But at the end of the day, one fact remains: it is a 35mm camera, with all the constraints and waste of 35mm (36 exposures is way, way too much for most people now; roll interchanges are best).

    Your money could be spent on diversifying your equipment to include medium format (any number of these formats are around 400% bigger than 35mm and subsequently have sharpness to really, really impress the masses). MF will provide a learning curve far removed from the brute looks and ease of use and high level automation and fuzzy intelligence that the 1V provides on tap.
    Something to remember: We all crave to use the latest and greatest, biggest and best. But you don't need a flash camera to create beautiful photographs. A few people here on APUG create their works on cameras that can be 80 and 130 years old (LF and ULF). A lot of mine are also done on a pinhole camera. But I'm not going to convince you to change your mind, just be careful before parting with a big sum of money.

    I'm reminded: a mint condition 1V was on sale in Melbourne (near where I live) about a fortnight ago for $975 (body only); I belive it was sold last weekend. That's an extremely low price for that marque that once sold for more than $3,500 body only.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loulou View Post
    Thanks for your thoughts Poisson. Thing is I really would like a good 35mm camera, both mine are now broken so this will be my primary camera and not a diversification to my collection as I don't have a collection as such. I have shot some medium format, my other half is also a keen photographer and I am lucky that he is so generous with his cameras that I can use them when I wish too. He actively encourages me to do MF. I loved most of the results I got with MF but I find it really difficult to get the results I would like to when I do my favourite photography which was the combination of my EOS 5 & my 100mm lens shooting macros. I just can't get close enough with MF, there probably is a way I just haven't figured it out yet. I also like quite blurry, mostly out of focus shots when I do macro so sharpness is not something I am looking for here. You can see what I mean here with some macros I posted on Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/louise_...306792/detail/

    What I am ultimately looking for is my workhorse camera, one that I can learn learn inside out and back to front that I can grow with. I'm not looking to change cameras again for a long time if I buy this, I wouldn't even be looking for one if my 5 hadn't broken. But I do want to make a sound investment in a camera that will challenge me and will continue to work for a long time to come.
    If all you do are macro's then any cheap EOS camera should do, you don't need the 1V, its an amazing camera, and great for hard weather and tough photoshoots, but the macro stuff is usually done with manual focus and so you could probably get away with just using a rebel body... spend $100 instead of $800 ...

    Also for MF macro, I use my Mamiya RZ67 with extension tubes, you can get 1:1, you can shoot many images without a macro lens because of the bellows on the RZ system... you can also get the RB system which is just as good for your purposes just a bit older version, and if you ever decide to upgrade form the RB to the RZ system, the lenses can be used on both.

    I almost feel I messed up with buying the RZ system, as the RB doesn't require batteries and I do a lot of long exposure shots at night these days and my batteries often fail on hour long exposures

    I digress... point is, take a look, the RB67 is super heavy, but certainly really nice macro's

    EDIT: oh and CHEAP!! look on ebay, they are going for like nothing! I got a whole system for $400... and that was the RZ67 which is newer, body, 2 lenses, 3 backs, polaroid back, viewfinder all for $400

  6. #16

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    Macros are only part of what I like to do but they are my favourite part. I'm also getting more into landscapes, I'm going on a week long Bruce Percy course in April and I need to be familiar with what ever camera I buy by then as I would like to do the course shooting mainly colour slide.

    I have tried doing something similar to my 35mm macro's with an RZ67, totally messed that up. That camera takes a bit of getting used to! I would like to try it again though, get to know the camera better and see what happens. Thanks for the tips on the extension tubes, I will look into that. I did get some results I was happy with when I shot with a Mamiya 7, that is a camera that I like. These are camera's I get to borrow to try out.

    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    If all you do are macro's then any cheap EOS camera should do, you don't need the 1V, its an amazing camera, and great for hard weather and tough photoshoots, but the macro stuff is usually done with manual focus and so you could probably get away with just using a rebel body... spend $100 instead of $800 ...

    Also for MF macro, I use my Mamiya RZ67 with extension tubes, you can get 1:1, you can shoot many images without a macro lens because of the bellows on the RZ system... you can also get the RB system which is just as good for your purposes just a bit older version, and if you ever decide to upgrade form the RB to the RZ system, the lenses can be used on both.

    I almost feel I messed up with buying the RZ system, as the RB doesn't require batteries and I do a lot of long exposure shots at night these days and my batteries often fail on hour long exposures

    I digress... point is, take a look, the RB67 is super heavy, but certainly really nice macro's

    EDIT: oh and CHEAP!! look on ebay, they are going for like nothing! I got a whole system for $400... and that was the RZ67 which is newer, body, 2 lenses, 3 backs, polaroid back, viewfinder all for $400

  7. #17
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    Canon EOS 1V?

    Quote Originally Posted by Loulou View Post
    Macros are only part of what I like to do but they are my favourite part. I'm also getting more into landscapes, I'm going on a week long Bruce Percy course in April and I need to be familiar with what ever camera I buy by then as I would like to do the course shooting mainly colour slide.

    I have tried doing something similar to my 35mm macro's with an RZ67, totally messed that up. That camera takes a bit of getting used to! I would like to try it again though, get to know the camera better and see what happens. Thanks for the tips on the extension tubes, I will look into that. I did get some results I was happy with when I shot with a Mamiya 7, that is a camera that I like. These are camera's I get to borrow to try out.
    Love the Mamiya 7 but not for Macro's...

    If you don't project your slides then shooing 6x7 chromes is just amazing,putting then on the light box... It's so fantastic!

    Best of luck!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #18
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    You will need a very sturdy tripod with the 1V and mirror lock-up + 2 second self timer engaged; it's size and weight gives a handy buffer against vibration, but macro requires care with a big camera. You might need to manually select a focusing point from the many that, to quite a few photographers, are inconveniently placed in a central cluster; this camera, like the EOS 5, EOS 3 and 1N variants, may still hunt and scratch in macro. The EF 100mm f2.8 macro would be a best match with manual focus engaged.

    I do not agree that any cheap EOS (or any other body) is OK for macro. Cheap cameras do not have the realiability that is so much a requirement for everyday landscape and critical photography.

    Have a look at the EOS resource created in Malaysia and of which I am an occasional contributor and moderator for the message board there: http://mir.com.my/ navigate to the EOS1V section; it's thick, detailed, technical and sometimes heavy reading with the occasional fractured ChingLish.

    The good thing about your choice, despite what else is said here, is that it will keep you away from the sickly scourge of digital! Bonza!
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #19

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    Thanks for the link, I found the correct section and will take a read through. My EF 100mm f2.8 macro is one of the lenses I use a lot, not just for macros, it a fantastic lens. I also have a pretty decent tripod, it has been used with a Mamyia RZ67 so I think it would cope with a 1V. I realise there are a lot of good cheap Canon's out there but I don't want to get something that I have to replace again soon. I only got my 5 last June so it didn't last long, I know it had been well looked after and not used much but it still broke in what I think of as a short space of time. Reliability is a big factor for me here.

    I'm more than happy to keep away from the "scourge of digital" Since my two analougue Canon's are broken I had to dig out my 40D last weekend to take photos with, what a soulless experience that was .

    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    You will need a very sturdy tripod with the 1V and mirror lock-up + 2 second self timer engaged; it's size and weight gives a handy buffer against vibration, but macro requires care with a big camera. You might need to manually select a focusing point from the many that, to quite a few photographers, are inconveniently placed in a central cluster; this camera, like the EOS 5, EOS 3 and 1N variants, may still hunt and scratch in macro. The EF 100mm f2.8 macro would be a best match with manual focus engaged.

    I do not agree that any cheap EOS (or any other body) is OK for macro. Cheap cameras do not have the realiability that is so much a requirement for everyday landscape and critical photography.

    Have a look at the EOS resource created in Malaysia and of which I am an occasional contributor and moderator for the message board there: http://mir.com.my/ navigate to the EOS1V section; it's thick, detailed, technical and sometimes heavy reading with the occasional fractured ChingLish.

    The good thing about your choice, despite what else is said here, is that it will keep you away from the sickly scourge of digital! Bonza!

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loulou View Post
    Thanks for the link, I found the correct section and will take a read through. My EF 100mm f2.8 macro is one of the lenses I use a lot, not just for macros, it a fantastic lens. I also have a pretty decent tripod, it has been used with a Mamyia RZ67 so I think it would cope with a 1V. I realise there are a lot of good cheap Canon's out there but I don't want to get something that I have to replace again soon. I only got my 5 last June so it didn't last long, I know it had been well looked after and not used much but it still broke in what I think of as a short space of time. Reliability is a big factor for me here.

    I'm more than happy to keep away from the "scourge of digital" Since my two analougue Canon's are broken I had to dig out my 40D last weekend to take photos with, what a soulless experience that was .
    My first professional digital was the 40D, I rather think it's a fairly good camera as digitals go, but yes, it is still digital, the image is what you put into it, if you created something beautiful, there's a little soul in there...

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