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Thread: Nasa's Nikon?

  1. #11

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    There is a term used in the antique business provenance. Fom the French provenir, "to come from", ahd refers to the chronology of the ownership, custody or location of a historical object. It is very important and seriously effects the value of an item. If the seller cannot provide you with this documented information then do not buy
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

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  2. #12
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Nasa's Nikon?

    I stand corrected, on page three of that link is a great run down of all the differences between the NASA f3 and a normal consumer f3 and there are many though many slight. An very interesting thread to read though.

  3. #13
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    This is a picture of me holding the camera used by John Glenn in his first flight. I am standing next to the camera engineer who designed and made the modifications.

    I can say that these were not trivial as noted in the Photo Net listing. These were made by hand back in those days.

    In the background are 2 capsules for the next launches. The one in the foreground is Liberty Bell 7. I later went into the clean room and got to inspect the capsule.

    The camera engineer is still with us today and is living in central FL. The camera is "supposed" to be in the Smithsonian.

    The names of all of the workers are engraved on the inside of the camera that is there.

    PE
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Me and Red with Mercury.jpg  

  4. #14

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    Great photo! The more I think of those guys climbing into those aluminum cans set atop thousands of pounds of liquid hydrogen and LOX, the more I am impressed by their bravery. Each one was a Lindbergh.

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    Quote Originally Posted by falotico View Post
    Great photo! The more I think of those guys climbing into those aluminum cans set atop thousands of pounds of liquid hydrogen and LOX, the more I am impressed by their bravery. Each one was a Lindbergh.
    I just re read The Right Stuff by Thom Wolf, and apparently the first NASA astronauts (most of whom were still air force or navy serving officers and only getting the service pay for their rank, nothing extre for being astronauts) were subjected to much derision by their friends who were also military pilots, because they told them "it couldn't be too difficult going into space, monkeys did it first.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 03-06-2013 at 01:47 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

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    I wonder if these cameras would work any better than the regular version or they may be worse. Definitely, no better than a regular camera of same model if we use them on earth.

  7. #17
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    The capsules were honeycomb Titanium with thin sheets of Titanium welded to each side of the honeycomb. The walls were about 2 cm thick and when you rapped on it, it was as solid as rock. No ring, no metal sound, no hollow sound. The sound was like knocking on a rock!

    The inside was a control panel (mostly indicator lights) and a seat. You just went for a ride.

    I have some souvenirs of the launch, and AFAIK, my name was the last to sign out before the launch and the first to sign in. The pad was still steaming.

    PE

  8. #18

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    Any association with NASA is very cool PE!
    Myself, I went to NASA standard soldering school while in the USAF. But that is the closest I got.

    More info from Nikon -> Vol. 12. Special titanium Nikon cameras and NASA cameras

  9. #19
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    Nasa's Nikon?

    That is a really cool photo PE! This is why apug is awesome there is just so much info to share! Its funny now how NASA has been using its mars rover camera now for self shots which are then stitched to remove the camera arm. It seemed we have moved so fast and far from the few short years of the discovery of powered flight to landing on the moon, that it makes our current pace seem a snail like.

  10. #20
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    Yes, isn't it amazing how far things have gone. Russia and China are the only two countries launching men into space, and the Cape is just about deserted.

    We used to have several launches each day. Now, the pads are rusting and unused. Even tourists are saddened by their condition.

    PE

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