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  1. #11

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    Apr 2010
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    A medium zoom like the Nikon 80-200/4 (and others) do not have a tripod socket. They are hand held lens, they were NOT designed to be used on a tripod. To put any medium to long lens without a tripod socket onto a camera, you have to screw the camera into the tripod. The lens then becomes big lever, pulling down on the lens mount and the tripod socket, not good for the camera.

    None of the push/pull Nikkor zooms that I have seen and handled, had a zoom lock on the zoom/focus ring.
    Maybe some of the 3rd party lenses had suck a lock.

    You can add grease to dampen the zoom mecahnism, but the problem is getting to the zoom mechanism.
    I was quoted over $200 to CLA an 80-200/f4 Nikon zoom. Most of the cost was to reassemble and recollimate the optics.
    Maybe other zooms are easier to access the zoom mechanism.

  2. #12

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    Dec 2012
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    St. Paul, MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by ac12 View Post
    None of the push/pull Nikkor zooms that I have seen and handled, had a zoom lock on the zoom/focus ring.
    Maybe some of the 3rd party lenses had suck a lock.
    Some Nikkors do have these locks, but they aren't common- off the top of my head, I think the 80-200 f/2.8 Ais and the 200-400 f/4 Ais had zoom/focus lock knobs; Nikon liked to put little focus "aids" on it's big lenses, like the 'focus memory' on most of the telephotos.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Gilsum NH
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    Not sure about a push pull lens fix but I have a 18 - 200 3.5 -5.6 G kit lens that creeps if you look at it hard. This lens has a rotary zoom and I use one the wide Livestrong yellow bands around lens putting part on fixed part of lens and part on the part that turns. This allows the numbers to be seen and does not hinder the zoom. Any of these wrist bands will work and they are a cheep fix.

  4. #14

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    Sep 2008
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    UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM2N View Post
    I use very thin black tape of the barrel of my 75-150 Nikon lens. It has been on there for the past year or so and has worked perfectly.
    Can post pic later if you want.
    Well I use clear sellotape as its not so obvious and keep adding till the zoom creep stops.

  5. #15
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Apr 2009
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    I saw the title and thought it was about paparazzi...
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #16

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    Nov 2012
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    New Jersey USA
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    There's some lenses that have "locks" sorta... I have an Oly 65-200 that has a macro twist+click in it's compressed state, which holds the lens together, and with some AFs the lens stays put. Still, the earlier optics are heavy and excessive looseness is just an age problem probably. I wonder if there's a marginally invasive method to "rejuvenize" the felt ring inside, like maybe carefully using something safe... like what fabric softener does to synthetics... assuming that the felt is synthetic. My understanding of lens components is that they are "dry" in their parts movements, and any lubricant is minimal in manufacturing, if at all.

  7. #17

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    Apr 2010
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    @beegee
    Some lenses have a fair amount of grease, some don't. An old trick is to use grease to "hide" wide tolerance.
    It is this grease that dries up over the years, and makes both the zoom and focus stiff on many older lenses.
    Putting any kind of liquid into a lens in an uncontrollable fashion is very risky. I don't know of any way to "rejuvinate" compressed/worn felt or velvet except to replace it. This is what I have to do with the negative carrier on my Durst L1000, where the velvet material has compressed flat.

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