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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markster View Post
    I am not an expert in repairing it, but I have read up on specific details regarding what makes the squeal. It isn't dried lubricant. It's more akin to a pin that rotates in a hole, and through forces acting upon that pin the hold elongates to an oval shape and the pin starts wearing oddly as well.

    All those "fixes" to quiet the noise with drops of oil strategically placed are only band-aids on a larger issue.

    The issue would be addressed by a proper CLA. If you got a CLA and it didn't resolve it -- you got ripped off. They didn't do a full cleaning and didn't replace the worn parts. I had an AE-1P that squealed horribly for many years until I got it CLAed. When it came back it was quiet as a new model and it has remained so for many years and to this day.

    I'm sorry to say I think you got swindled for the most part on your past CLA experiences.

    H'mm so what about all the A model Canons that haven't been used much to wear anything out, but have the squeak................

  2. #22
    Markster's Avatar
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    The part that wears out is plastic, after all. Logically it could be the age of the plastic and other factors that can make it happen.

    Practically, I don't know. Just that the sources I read about this were professionals that repaired and used Canon A's for a living. Something about a bushing wearing out. They would always take an extra bushing on assignments for replacements in the field.
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

  3. #23
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    OK - and I'm only going to say this once...

    the ONLY way to service any A series Canon camera correctly is to REMOVE THE mirror box totally!

    Then you can lubricate all the mirror governor gears, clean the mirror box release magnet, clean the AE contact and brushes on the side of the mirror box, re-lubricate the shutter rollers so the shutter blinds run consistantly each time they are fired (so each curtain runs at 14.5MS from memory - its been a while since I've adjusted some) so that you can get consistant shutter speeds.

    It also easier with the box out to clean the other switches and contacts, although you can remove and clean the shutter release magnet on the bottom without taking the box out.

    The problem is that this takes time.....when I was repairing them for a living at Canon Australia and did them on a regular basis a A1 would take me 2 1/2 hours or so, a AE1 about the same (I hated working on them because of the tungsten wire running from the shutter speed dial to the ASA dial), and around 1 1/2 hours for a AE1 Program...

    Even back then most technicians would remove the front plate, or the top cover and squirt in a bit of oil to stop the governor from squeaking (the squeak is caused by dry bearings on the mirror governor mechanism). And some even drilled a hole in the bottom chasis of the camera and squirted in oil that way! The nett result was that a "serivce" could be done in under a hour.....

    So if you want to get the camera serviced correctly you need to find a technician who was trained by Canon to do it the correct way. I know one, but he's in Melbourne, Australia, and at 65 he's talking about retirement.......

    And it's not me! Sorry - I don't do A1's any more. AE1P - yes - love those, but I won't touch any of the other A series anymore - the circuit boards are getting old and brittle, and no matter how careful you are tracks can (and do) break, and it takes hours to get everything working agian....

    Cheers

    Andrew

    PS - and no - the T series didn't develop a squeak...they have their own unique problems with disintergrating rubber buffers in the shutter unit causing the shutter blades to stick............
    A camera is only a black box with a hole in it....

    my blog...some film, some digital http://andrewk1965.wordpress.com/

  4. #24
    Andrew K's Avatar
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    One other thing.... the plastic parts on A series don't "wear out".

    I've serviced/repaired good a few hundred A series cameras over 20 years, and aside from physical damage caused by dirt/use of force (and the very rare manufacturing fault) I've never replaced any of the plastic parts in a camera....

    The squeak in A series cameras is caused by the original lubricant in the mirror governor mechanism drying out over several years - this could happen in as little as 4 or 5 years depending on the climate the cameras were used and stored in (this is based in my experiences working for Canon in the early 90's, when some A series models had only been discontinued in Australia for 4 or 5 years...)

    Magnets (especially relese magnets)...that's another story....some get so dirty you can't clean them, and the only way to fix them is to replace them....

    One other thing I should say - don't forget that these camera were discontinued around 20 years ago - there are really no new spare parts available, so often you have to use a second hand part to get one going, which can present it's own set of problems....
    Last edited by Andrew K; 04-09-2013 at 02:17 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A camera is only a black box with a hole in it....

    my blog...some film, some digital http://andrewk1965.wordpress.com/

  5. #25
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    What the uninformed refer to as a "shutter squeal" on Canon A series cameras ( it doesn't occur on the F series ) is a dry bearing on the fly wheel on the mirror braking mechanism, often results in people trying to lubricate the shutter mechanism with disastrous results.
    Ben

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markster View Post
    The part that wears out is plastic, after all. Logically it could be the age of the plastic and other factors that can make it happen.

    Practically, I don't know. Just that the sources I read about this were professionals that repaired and used Canon A's for a living. Something about a bushing wearing out. They would always take an extra bushing on assignments for replacements in the field.

    I call BS at the idea of replacing bushings or gears in the field.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  7. #27
    Markster's Avatar
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    I do admit I could be mis-remembering what the exact details were. It was some kind of replacement part. These were solid professionals though. The context was when you had to take a camera on a trip somewhere in the world and having the camera fail to function was not an option. I've disassembled A-1 and AE-1P tops on my coffee table before (me! of all people!), so if you have a good place to do it, you can probably do any kind of repair.
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

  8. #28
    Andrew K's Avatar
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    It has been a while, but in 5 years of repaining A series cameras at Canon Australia I may have seen 1 camera that needed the mirror governor mechanism replaced (and I think that was the AE1 that had a very strange fault, where the first exposure after the camera had been sitting for a while produced a photo that was 1 1/2 stops underexposed. We ended up changing almost everything on it. In the end it we found it had a bent chasis, and was fixed with a large hammer and a anvil..)

    There was no plastic part I can recall on any of the A series that needed regular replacing, especially a part that could have been replaced by removing just the top or bottom covers..

    Actually - the only part I can recall that was a semi - common problem that could be fixed by removing the top or bottom cover only was the release magnet on the bottom of the camera, which could become sticky so your camera wouldn't fire when you pressed the shutter button. To replace one of these you only needed to remove 2 screws - and undo 2 solder contacts....


    I used A's professionally to shoot motorsport for a couple of years before I replaced them with NF1's, and never had a problem with them.
    A camera is only a black box with a hole in it....

    my blog...some film, some digital http://andrewk1965.wordpress.com/

  9. #29
    AgX
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    I often read aboud sticky electro-magnets at different cameras. What are the causes?

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markster View Post
    I do admit I could be mis-remembering what the exact details were. It was some kind of replacement part. These were solid professionals though. The context was when you had to take a camera on a trip somewhere in the world and having the camera fail to function was not an option. I've disassembled A-1 and AE-1P tops on my coffee table before (me! of all people!), so if you have a good place to do it, you can probably do any kind of repair.
    Last time I did that, I brought a Nikon F.

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