Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,934   Posts: 1,585,602   Online: 660
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 43
  1. #1
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,681
    Images
    344

    Longest handheld exposure

    Assuming you were trying to obtain an acceptably sharp image, at reasonable magnification such as a 10” X 8” print, using a standard lens on your format of choice, what is the longest handheld exposure you would attempt using a standard lens? The best I have achieved is ¼ second with my back pressed against a wall. Of course this is also dependent on how much you have had to drink the night before.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #2
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    779
    Images
    19
    I don't like to waste film, 1/30 only If I have to. 6x6 FYI

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,560
    Images
    300
    I once did a 1/8th second exposure with my Hasselblad that prints nicely to 11x14. I sat on the floor and aimed the camera up for a photograph of the ceiling of the Wisconsin state capitol building in Madison. The camera was held with both hands, and I pressed up against a stone pillar, resting my arms in my lap. Don't know if that counts. No mirror lockup. Tripods were not allowed, but I used a cable release that I released with my teeth, believe it or not.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #4
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,681
    Images
    344
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I once did a 1/8th second exposure with my Hasselblad that prints nicely to 11x14. I sat on the floor and aimed the camera up for a photograph of the ceiling of the Wisconsin state capitol building in Madison. The camera was held with both hands, and I pressed up against a stone pillar, resting my arms in my lap. Don't know if that counts. No mirror lockup. Tripods were not allowed, but I used a cable release that I released with my teeth, believe it or not.
    Was that with the mirror locked up?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  5. #5
    MaximusM3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    NY
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    756
    Images
    6
    With a Leica? 1/4, 1/8 no problem. Couple of deep breaths...and no double espresso Although, if I don't forget, I try to use Tom Abrahamsson's soft release for those. Big help.

  6. #6
    NedL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,006
    Images
    17
    I don't know a good answer, but I have one example that was 1/4th second with the 35mm camera itself braced on a rail but tilted up with my left hand under the lens to frame the image.. it is perfectly fine. Another from the same day was 1/8th second handheld at my eye... I was standing and made it as well as I am possibly able ( shutter released as I breathed out... as still as can be ) and I made an 8x10 print that is definitely soft. It still looks nice, but there is softness. I'm glad I made the photo and I like it.

    I've wondered about this topic in another way... I have some old folding MF cameras. They have top shutter speeds of 1/100 and 1/200. One has a 105mm lens with speeds of 1/25 and 1/50 and it does not have a tripod socket. Obviously it was made to use those shutter speeds even though by the "1 over focal length" rule these would be too long for handheld use. When I use 100 speed film, it can be a problem keeping the shutter speed as fast as 1/100 if there's shade or it's not a bright day. Probably this has all been covered on APUG a thousand times, but I wonder if that "1 over focal length" rule of thumb is really only for 35mm cameras... It seems odd that the camera would be made without a tripod socket and have only the fastest speed usable with the films that would have been available at that time. Someday I'll try some 1/25 and see how it goes....
    Last edited by NedL; 04-10-2013 at 06:54 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2
    Braced against knees, walls, etc, anything down to 1/4 sec. Freehand, nothing lower than 1/60 for a 10 x 8" print, 1/30 on a leaf shutter model.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New Jersey (again)
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    2,008
    In 35mm, 1/10 is about my limit. I guess that would be 1/8 or 1/15 in today's shutter speeds.

    For folding cameras, I really don't like to get below 1/25.

  9. #9
    NedL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,006
    Images
    17
    Oops. I always forget to look at what forum I'm in! Sorry if my MF musings were off-topic! I'm still curious about it though!

    Also, it would probably be relevant to mention that my 1/4s and 1/8s examples were with a 24mm lens.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    16,887
    i regularly hand hold a box camera with either 4x5 film or 4x5 paper negatives
    for 10 seconds or more ... i have a handful of them in my gallery here on apug

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin