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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by kimoni View Post
    Ah I see what you mean about the pinhole camera now.

    To be honest I'm nowhere near as pro as some of you are, like I said I'm just an amateur but I like to experiment. I don't develop my own film in a darkroom unfortunately I don't know how, I either have my film developed professionally or I scan my negatives in with a scanner.

    Saying that, there's a photographic studio down the road who run courses in developing film so maybe I'll give that a go. I really like the idea of the pinhole camera so I will look into that further. Where's best to find film for this (larger than 35mm??)

    Thanks for all your helpful replies
    http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trks...at=0&_from=R40
    just search on eboink using "xray film" as your search string ...

    as long as you have a dim-lit room ( sort of dark ) and you can stick a red light bulb in it ( safe light )
    and can get 3 ( or 2 ) tupperware trays .. you can easily develop xray film, its easy and you can process it in 2 chemicals
    caffenol ( washing soda and instant coffee ) and old fashioned hypo / fixer adorama &c sometimes run HUGE specials on plain old sodium thiosulfate ..
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/6...e-fixer-2.html should help you with a hypo recipe with a teaspoon

    get a cheapo- medium format / roll film box camera or folder from goodwill and put xray film in it and shoot BIG negatives that you cut down ..
    after you develop the image on the xray film ... ( even spool and roll your own film spools .. i do it with photo paper in a post card camera .. its easy and fun +
    with xray film, both sides are light sensitive ! )
    then you can dip the film in knox gelatin, or "flexible" collodion bought from a pharmacy or "water glass" they dip eggs in or ?
    and make a layer of something extra on the film that you can then add things to ... ink, paint &c and scratches or whatever ..
    its just easier to see what you are doing when the negative is a little bigger

    have fun!
    john

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by fstop View Post
    Scan it into photoshop and then go crazy
    PAGAN!
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  3. #23

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    Dig out in Surrealism and the techniques employed by the surrealists - heating of unfixed film was developed as an artistic practice in the 1930s; so were the random multiple exposures; and so much more...

  4. #24

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    i've been a fan of cut-ups ... like bourroughs did (with writing) but with film,
    taking a roll of film and shredding it / cutting it up, then a putting it in a RANDOM pile ( flat or no so flat )
    and making contact prints / photograms from that /// water damage always does great stuff ... just leaving film in a puddle of water or
    having drips of water on it to eat away at the emulsion ... or print through the film with something on it
    unfortunately rubber cement, acetone, varnishes/urethanes, paints, waxes, collodion and similar slurries are flammable
    so if you go this route, you have to work fast before you have something like a movie-house fire in your darkroom

  5. #25

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    The burying film and watering with beer to cultivate mould is a genius idea. I also like the heating/freezing method to get cracks.

    Just googled Joel Peter Witkin... wow that's some macabre stuff. Dark.

    I'm going to have to try developing something in my bedroom too, it doesn't sound too complicated

    I wasn't expecting half the number of useful replies here, thanks everyone!

  6. #26
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    This is where we can get some ideas from Lomography. For instance, put your film in a dishwasher: http://www.lomography.com/magazine/t...the-dishwasher
    Or, you can try chemicals, like bleach, making film soup, roasting in the oven, or many other ways to torture your film. http://www.lomography.com/magazine/l...emical-cowboys
    I have not personally tried these, but the results are interesting.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  7. #27
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Last week I shot a roll of agfa vario 1000, expired 1971, that I had exposed at ei50.

    The developer was at 24C, wash water about 22c, fixer about 18C. Non hardening alkaline fixer.

    Well non hardening fixer, that was a mistake on this old soft gelatine emulsion it turns out

    I got reticulation of the likes that I have only come close to seeing in books on processing errors.

    I washed gently about 22C for 5 minutes, go hang to dry, and watch the gelatine at the bottom start to slide off where I go to attach a clip.

    Back into a hardener bath that I usually keep around for use before repeated intensifier bath immersion cycles.

    Wash again. This time the gelatine has shrunk and stays on the film.

    Fogged all to hell, which is really no surprise given the age of the film stock, and that faster films fog faster.

    Next stage may be a bath in a weak rehalogenating bleach and then refix, to try to peel off some of the fogging.

    I did not start to torture this film, but look what happend.

    I think Adox still makes old soft emulsion films if getting reticulation and gelatine sloughing is your thing.
    my real name, imagine that.

  8. #28

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    if you learn how to process paper ... you can coat glass plates with liquid emulsion ( not as hard as it sounds ! )
    and use non-harending fixer and the emulsion will lift and stretch and if you are lucky fall back down on the plate
    all on top of itself making creases and overlaps &c ... a lot of dry plate folks avoid this ( frilling ) but it is a nice technique
    to know about if you like to experiment. you could probably do something similar with paper instead of glass ... the first
    kodak cameras from what i have read were paper negatives, but the emulsion was slid off onto something else to print ( glass? )
    anyhow its kind of like the old-school emulsion transfer polaroid experimenters used to to ...
    you can also mix up a weak batch of potassium ferricyanide ( farmer's reducer ) and paint your film or paper with that
    (after you have an image ) it will remove layers of the image and lighten it ... just make sure you re-fix (it) afterwards
    because it will be light sensitive at that point ... ( or leave it to have an image that might morph into something else? ).

    lots of ways to destroy and manipulate film and prints ...
    i hope when you stumble upon something else you let us see the fun results !

    john

  9. #29
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    If you are up on coating glass plates, stainlees steel plates, etc. then do a first coat of unhardened gelatin, dry, than second coat of emulsion with hardened gelatine.

    Then soak the proceeded plate after development and fixing and cool wash in warmish water, and the unhardened gelatin will release and you can strip the emulsion off and transfer it to almost whatever you want. I the good old graphics art wet layup days there was an actual job called a plate stripper.
    my real name, imagine that.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by kimoni View Post
    I realize this is quite an unusual question and I'm not sure how to phrase it in a google search, but if anyone knows what might elicit interesting results, what to shoot with the film etc... I'd love to hear!

    Thanks for reading
    K

    Google "distressing film" and variations. There is a lot of info and examples on the net.

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