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  1. #11

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    well its like this, 35mm to me is like a sketch book to a painter. Not the final say on the issue,rather a time to ruminate on the subject matter quickly and cheaply. By using Different angles, lenses, perspective, film speed, developer, composition, filters, etc. . . I can come up with a strategy for what I want and How I am going to execute. Then when I have a clear "Idea" ( composition, time of day, weather condition, perspective, film choice, D.O.F). issues are ALL CLEAR!! I will shoot 4x5 or 120.for the "keeper" I will visit and revisit concept/ subject matter until I get what, or just give up on it... . . . .
    that being said, I do not "shoot" street photography. that is kinda hard to reproduce, Don't ya think"??? however if it is landscape cityscape, still life. . . . . then the question is "what is your COMMITTMENT to "image"???? what DO YOU want out of it. What are YOUR RULES!!!! WHAT is Your Vision!!! The print defines those. IT states it CLEARLY!!! AS far as prints go: working prints from 35mm are 4 11/16 inches x 7 1/8" inches (5x) enlargement, take a 8x10 paper, cut in half. so 5x8 make your print. during these work prints. I am solely looking at the idea; content, comp. lighting etc. . . . In the words of "W" stra-T- ger-ry!!! technically speaking I low expectations for 35mm, but it is quick, cheap, and plentiful, easy to carry, I can think, without "Thinking" if you know what I mean, or do ya???

  2. #12

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    Ah, a variation of the film vs. digital debate. It reminds me of the CD vs. vinyl debate in the music world.

    If you've shot only digital, you shouldn't expect digital results. There is no grainless image. Like life, film has its flaws. The light meter might not "read" the scene correctly. You might miss focus. Dust spots on the negative.

    I would recommend that you don't spend endless hours comparing film results to digital. They are different mediums like charcoal sketches and oil paintings.

    By the way, replace the foam seals on your camera, if they haven't already been replaced. Otherwise, you'll learn about the flaw of Japanese cameras - the use of light-blocking foam, which turns to goo after a couple of decades and allow light to seep in and fog your film. Don't let that get into the shutter mechanism -- that would be bad news for the shutter.

  3. #13
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    I use 35mm in 95% of time. Print up to 30x45cm. When I want grainless results (rarely) I use ISO 20-100, but most of the time I use iso 400 films and I like the grain. Actually grain is the last thing in my concern - most important is composition, meaning... when I make something that I like - I never think: "ohh if only I had used medium format or lower iso so that grain is not there". Actually often I use Lith print to get grain bigger (Moersch Easy Lith + Fomabrom is the key example: http://darkosaric.deviantart.com/art/Lith-10-130219602 ).

  4. #14
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    A while back, a friend of mine wanted framed 11"x14" prints of two of my images that complemented each other. I had shot one with my digital, and the other on 35mm film. I had a lab print the digital photo, and I wet printed the film photo in the darkroom. An untrained eye would not have been able to tell the difference.

  5. #15
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Christian View Post
    A while back, a friend of mine wanted framed 11"x14" prints of two of my images that complemented each other. I had shot one with my digital, and the other on 35mm film. I had a lab print the digital photo, and I wet printed the film photo in the darkroom. An untrained eye would not have been able to tell the difference.
    Probably a good lab ... when I did not printed manually all my B&W photos from lab had some green offset, and not even one lab was able to give me true deep blacks in the print.
    About framed prints: I can agree, but holding in hand double weight fiber based print is not comparable with anything .

  6. #16
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    Sorry, darkosaric. There really is something magical about a real silver gelatin print. The point I was attempting to make is that prints made from 35mm in the darkroom can be just as detailed and sharp as lab prints from digital images.

  7. #17
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Christian View Post
    Sorry, darkosaric. There really is something magical about a real silver gelatin print. The point I was attempting to make is that prints made from 35mm in the darkroom can be just as detailed and sharp as lab prints from digital images.
    No worries .

  8. #18
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    As one who uses 35mm, 6x9 and 4x5... I can tell you what I expect of 35mm comparatively.

    While 6x9 and 4x5 offer more film area, and result in less grain and more sharp detail, a fine grain film in 35mm can compare. I find subjectively the 35mm shows me the same amount of detail - but the edges are not as sharply defined as when I use larger formats.

    You can say I unfairly compare traditional grain film 35mm to tabular grain 4x5, that is two changes at once. Yes I made two changes in my step up from 35mm.

    Slides (or color) 35mm I expect freedom from flare, and I paint an impression of the scene before me. A Macro lens is important to me because after taking in the wide scene, I focus on studying details that make up parts of the scene - as an exploration of the environment. With 4x5, one shot takes all and I leave the scene (because I have limited amount of film, each scene gets one, two or if I lose myself and forget my limitation 4-6 shots).

    35mm allows me to shoot a series that gives an impression of the scene with rich detail, while 4x5 gives similar impression in one shot. Not sure that one exceeds the other, because the amount of detail is infinite with both systems because you can just get closer.

    With 35mm I expect clear, clean, scratch-free frames. With larger formats, in vintage cameras I get some flare, specks of dust, occasional but light scratches. Other photographers can get pristine negatives from medium and large formats. I tend to get pristine 35mm and lightly flawed negatives from larger formats.

  9. #19
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    Basically if the print "works".

    Every time I think I've figured out a standard for myself, I have found a way to break the rule and get a print that works or see somebody else who has.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #20
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    As much as I love printing MF and 4x5, there's a whole magical look to 35mm. I now shoot mostly 400 speed because anything smaller than 16x20 has a lovely texture to it that you don't see with larger film formats and not at all in the digital world (noise isn't so pretty). Some 35mm 100 shots can definitely go larger, but often times what I photograph with 35mm isn't worth going that large. It's not a format to go chasing Ansel with, but like anything, play up it's strengths and you'll forget it's weaknesses.
    K.S. Klain

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