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  1. #11
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteNoone View Post
    They were developed by ds colour labs. I don't really know my shooting technique.. Amateur remember! Could anyone recommend a good colour film? And if possible a good UK lab?
    Fuji Superia, Kodak Gold, any of the pro films. Labs?

    For B&W Ilford Delta 400 and Kodak TMax 400 are great. Ilford has their own lab in the UK for B&W.

    As to shooting and metering, I'd suggest using a nice incident meter and shooting at box speed. Takes the guess work out of the equation.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #12
    Ricardo Miranda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Yep, looks like he has a good eye.

    Pete, do you have an instruction manual for your camera? Also, what is a "P30n"?
    Yep, I agree they are nice shots!
    He is referring to the Pentax P30N, an SLR from the middle 80s. It is the P3n in the US.

    Pete
    I use http://www.snapsphotoservices.com/ They are very good, fast and cheap. They are based in Bournemouth, UK.
    You can see here samples of Fomapan developed and scanned by them on the Flickr page of this chap: http://www.flickr.com/photos/chris10585/
    For some reading, any book from the 80s and 90s about general photography or 35mm photography should do. You might be able to find in your local library books by Michael Busselle.
    If you don't have the manuals, here you can see them in PDF format: http://www.butkus.org/chinon/pentax.htm

    Kentmere and Fomapan might be on the cheap side, but they are good films. Foma has improved production quality and a new base film in the last year. You can find Fomapan 100 at £2.60 a roll with Silverprint and for Kentmere the cheapest is around £32.00 for a pack of 10 rolls with Discount Films direct. They are good and reputable companies operating for many years.

    Pete,
    Amateur only means you don't make money out of it. It doesn't mean you aren't an artist or a knowledgeable chap!
    Enjoy your photography!
    My cameras:
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    Zenit 11, 12XP
    Nikon F4, F4S, F401S, F601, F801, F801S, F50, F55, F60, F65, F70, F75, F80, F90, F90X, EL2, FE, FM, FG, FG-20, EM

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ricardo Miranda View Post
    Yep, I agree they are nice shots!
    He is referring to the Pentax P30N, an SLR from the middle 80s. It is the P3n in the US.

    Pete
    I use http://www.snapsphotoservices.com/ They are very good, fast and cheap. They are based in Bournemouth, UK.
    You can see here samples of Fomapan developed and scanned by them on the Flickr page of this chap: http://www.flickr.com/photos/chris10585/
    For some reading, any book from the 80s and 90s about general photography or 35mm photography should do. You might be able to find in your local library books by Michael Busselle.
    If you don't have the manuals, here you can see them in PDF format: http://www.butkus.org/chinon/pentax.htm

    Kentmere and Fomapan might be on the cheap side, but they are good films. Foma has improved production quality and a new base film in the last year. You can find Fomapan 100 at £2.60 a roll with Silverprint and for Kentmere the cheapest is around £32.00 for a pack of 10 rolls with Discount Films direct. They are good and reputable companies operating for many years.

    Pete,
    Amateur only means you don't make money out of it. It doesn't mean you aren't an artist or a knowledgeable chap!
    Enjoy your photography!
    "Amateur" comes from a Latin root meaning "love". It means you do it because you love to. It says nothing about level of skill, etc.

  4. #14
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    Agreed, these are terrible scans or you have very old, expired, stored next to a heater film. Can't help you on the labs, but I suggest you buy a yellow K2 filter (shouldn't be very much) to make the clouds stand out better on the sky. The third picture is still a light leak (somewhere, either in the camera, in loading or in processing, light is getting to the film) but unless it shows up repeatably, it is very difficult to track down. If it is in the camera, it will be on multiple frames; if it is in the loading/unloading, it usually affect first or last couple of frames; if it is in the lab, it will show up a random times and switching labs will confirm.

    Amateur, from the French for "lover of". I have been shooting for 25 years and consider myself an amateur.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  5. #15

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    Your last beach image is wonderful! I really like the composition, and as a serendipitous mistake, the grain works... at least it does for me! For some reason, I saw your photograph, and I was reminded of Vettriano's "The Singing Butler" for some reason...

    Keep with it! The lab screwed you, thats all. Id assume the negs are fine.
    Last edited by PtJudeRI; 06-26-2013 at 03:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16

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    I would say there is not a lot wrong with the content of your photos, but the development and scanning looks a bit ropey to me.

    Unless you have an attachment to 'real' B&W film, you could try out Kodak BW400CN or Ilford XP2 Super, both are black and white films, but process as colour (C41) films. They are both contrasty and high resolution, and as they process as C41, any lab can process them, and the process is fixed, not really open to interpretation, so there is less to go wrong.

  7. #17
    Ricardo Miranda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    "Amateur" comes from a Latin root meaning "love". It means you do it because you love to. It says nothing about level of skill, etc.
    Yes, it comes from "amat" as in "Julia Romeo amat", if my Latin is any good!
    My cameras:
    Fed 2
    Zenit 11, 12XP
    Nikon F4, F4S, F401S, F601, F801, F801S, F50, F55, F60, F65, F70, F75, F80, F90, F90X, EL2, FE, FM, FG, FG-20, EM

  8. #18
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Fuji Superia, Kodak Gold, any of the pro films. Labs?

    For B&W Ilford Delta 400 and Kodak TMax 400 are great. Ilford has their own lab in the UK for B&W.

    As to shooting and metering, I'd suggest using a nice incident meter and shooting at box speed. Takes the guess work out of the equation.
    This is indeed very good suggestion. Shooting at box speed with incident meter reading.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  9. #19

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    In my opinion, they look like very badly scanned. I once had experience of similar coarse and smeared grain when using a very (but I mean VERY, VERY) old bottle of Rodinal, that was even left partly open, so I guess it had gone bad. This is to say that it also makes me think about a nearly exhausted developer. I am an amateur and beginner too, starting black and white photography, so I am saying this based only on my personal experience and not thorough testing. But I really like your photos and wish you to find the culprit and improve your technique.

  10. #20
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    I use Agfa Vista+ from Poundland mostly. Not the world's greatest film but made by Fuji and more than adequate. AG Photographic develop and scan films at quite a reasonable price (£3.99 for development and £2.99 for a scan to CD).

    I agree the actual pictures are fine - just the dirty scans letting you down.

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