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  1. #31

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  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Click on the link.
    did you? it took me to his photo gallery

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vilk View Post
    did you? it took me to his photo gallery
    I did, it took me to a page with clickable links to each of the service manuals. Your link takes me to a different page with the same links.

  4. #34

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    Yeah, I get only a photo gallery too. But as it turns out I have the Nikon F assembly manual and the meter adjustment bulletin on my hard drive already.

  5. #35

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    Wow.

    Sorry guys, I have no clue... the original link still takes me to the manuals... it must be the aliens messing with me again. At least they're not using the probe today.

  6. #36

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    Proper lube of the F

    It seems to me that the proper lubrication procedure of the camera would entail removal of the mirror box to allow free access to whatever lube points may be involved. Specifically thinking of the shutter drum shafts. But certainly I do not see how any proper lubrication of the camera can happen with the just the top, bottom, and front covers removed, especially the upper shutter shaft.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    It seems to me that the proper lubrication procedure of the camera would entail removal of the mirror box to allow free access to whatever lube points may be involved. Specifically thinking of the shutter drum shafts. But certainly I do not see how any proper lubrication of the camera can happen with the just the top, bottom, and front covers removed, especially the upper shutter shaft.
    Yes. It isn't that difficult. The camera breaks down to subassemblies. Just beware of any shims, sometimes there are shim washers hiding between things and it's very important these go back where found. I've been replacing any gummy foam with felt or wool.

  8. #38

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    I have here a F and and F2 that a buddy disassembled and gave up on. On the F, the mirror box is gone, and I can see the shutter drums clearly. The shutter drum shafts are covered by a flange, to where there is no access to the actual spindle (shaft). It would seem to me that the only hope of getting a drop of clock oil on the shaft is to just let some run down in there, and blow out and wipe up any mess or excess.
    I can appreciate any little plastic shims to be accounted for in the removal of the mirror box, but I the assembly manual doesn't make clear what home positions of the dials or settings are required for proper removal of the mirror box. A lever or doo-dad under tension or out-of-time when lifting the mirror box free from the body would spell disaster. I've dealt with Pentaxes and Mamiya/Sekors, but each has its base settings for assembly/disassembly.
    But I maintain that I do not see how a proper "CLA" can take place without removal of the mirror housing (and God knows what else). A half done job is no better than no job at all.

  9. #39

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    An afternoon of dissection and study

    I'm not sure taking this thread in this direction is out-of-category. Anyway, an afternoon of disassembling 2 junk Nikon F bodies for study has made me evermore determined that a truly complete lube job necessarily requires that the shutter drum and roller spindles need oil. A lifetime in machinery of all kinds has taught me that any spindle or shaft that turns in a bushing; is prone to "chatter" when the bushing and spindle is bone dry. And 40-50 years of age assures me that they are dry as dust. Metal wicks oil, it has a certain porosity.
    On the Nikon F, there is a drum on the operators side, and 2 rollers on the film-supply side. The shop manual calls them right and left, opposite of what I regard r and l, so I use operators and supply herein. All of this comes down to the realization that the aft roller on the supply side of the camera cannot be accessed without removing the mirror box. And if there IS any chattering of the rotating spindles, shutter speed is bound to be erratic.
    Therefore all I can conclude that if this camera is sent out for a "CLA", and this is not done, then it wasn't much of a "CLA". I've always rolled my eyes at how that term is thrown around.
    I have had 7 Nikons F's to come through my hands from ebay, and while all 7 might have worked initially, 2 of the 7 jammed up in short order. You just can't buy these things from storage and dresser drawers, and start using them like they were new. They definitely need attention.

    Any reader that takes issue with this and thinks I'm all wet is welcome to chime in. Remember, I'm entirely self taught--a method that leads to being over-thorough in some things, and negligent in others.
    Last edited by Tom1956; 06-27-2013 at 10:53 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    I'm not sure taking this thread in this direction is out-of-category. Anyway, an afternoon of disassembling 2 junk Nikon F bodies for study has made me evermore determined that a truly complete lube job necessarily requires that the shutter drum and roller spindles need oil. A lifetime in machinery of all kinds has taught me that any spindle or shaft that turns in a bushing; is prone to "chatter" when the bushing and spindle is bone dry. And 40-50 years of age assures me that they are dry as dust. Metal wicks oil, it has a certain porosity.
    On the Nikon F, there is a drum on the operators side, and 2 rollers on the film-supply side. The shop manual calls them right and left, opposite of what I regard r and l, so I use operators and supply herein. All of this comes down to the realization that the aft roller on the supply side of the camera cannot be accessed without removing the mirror box. And if there IS any chattering of the rotating spindles, shutter speed is bound to be erratic.
    Therefore all I can conclude that if this camera is sent out for a "CLA", and this is not done, then it wasn't much of a "CLA". I've always rolled my eyes at how that term is thrown around.
    I have had 7 Nikons F's to come through my hands from ebay, and while all 7 might have worked initially, 2 of the 7 jammed up in short order. You just can't buy these things from storage and dresser drawers, and start using them like they were new. They definitely need attention.

    Any reader that takes issue with this and thinks I'm all wet is welcome to chime in. Remember, I'm entirely self taught--a method that leads to being over-thorough in some things, and negligent in others.
    When lubricating anything, you must first remove any old/contaminated lubricant. The surfaces must be clean, otherwise the oil will creep away from where it belongs. Proper lubrication often requires that the item in question is lubricated as it is assembled, since certain lubrication points are inaccesible when the item is completely assembled. At least two lubricants are required for any camera/shutter, a light clock oil and a light grease. Why clock oil? Because it stays put - it doesn't creep away and leave the lubrication point dry. Any oil, if applied to a dirty area, will creep. When available, follow the manufacturer's instructions as to type and quantity of lubricant. Only a very small quantity is needed - one drop of oil is enough for several cameras. Use watch/clock maker's oilers, if these are uavailable use a crowquill drawing pen.

    As for metal being porous, except for cast iron it isn't. Oilite (tm Chrysler Corp) bearings are sometimes used for shaft bushings, these are made of sintered particles of bronze and are like a sponge for oil.

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