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  1. #11
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Ah yes -- the simple question that can't be answered!

    I have a fairly old Lowepro Micro Trekker that holds most of my Canon FD gear (an A-1 and 3 or 4 FD lenses plus some miscellany). I also have a more recent Lowepro Computrekker that can contain most of my Bronica SQ-A gear -- only problem is I could probably not carry it more than 200 yards full! In both cases, I use those backpacks mostly for storage. In use I tend toward a not necessarily photo specific shoulder bag or fanny pack -- or just a strap around my neck -- depending on what I view as the needs for a specific day/project. I sometimes use one of a couple of non-photo shoulder bags ("man bags") to one of which I've added a bit of padding. In the dusty archives is an assortment of pretty conventional "gadget" bags, some going back about 40 years.. And yes friends, I still find myself eyeballing new bags now and again.

    I have a Tamron pouch, part of a modular series, that can hang on a regular belt. It will pretty much fit my Ercona II 6x9 folder (and little else). It can alternatively fit my Perkeo II 6x6 folder plus a Gossen Digisix, filter or two, and two or three rolls of film.

    I also have a Think Tank "Urban Disguise 30" -- a nice non-camera-obvious bag. That can carry a fair amount of stuff, but getting larger things in and out can be a bit tedious because it has a zippered slot, not a liftable lid. I also own a Think Tank "Digital Holster 20" which I sometimes use to carry digits, but it also fits other SLRs (and is pretty obviously camera related).

    And then there's a 4x5 press camera, a 4x5 pinhole camera and an 8x10 pinhole camera -- those I try to find subjects near where I can park the car!

    So basically, in my opinion, there's no answer!

  2. #12

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    You see this same sort of question very often on Leica forums, but then the lens is $2500 not $400, not to mention the body.

    And the sage advice from people who have been around a bit is that thieves don't know a Leica from a Diana, and just looking nervous and shifty with a disguised camera bag is more likely to attract attention than flaunting it. People even put black tape over the red dot logo thinking they have disguised the camera, in reality they just made it look more intriguing. A Canon is bigger, and looks like a DSLR, so it might attract a bit more attention than a much more expensive Leica, but it is for using, not hiding away. The key to any situation is to look like you are meant to be there, have a casual 'authority' in your body language. And for this a casual looking bag is ideal, it neither brands you 'photo-nerd' nor 'police observer'. I would recommend the Think Tank 'Retrospective' bags, very comfy, semi-casual, protective, well designed, and if a light fingered pick pocket did get interested in the contents they have a large area of Velcro fastening that would wake the dead with its ripping noise (but it can be silenced for when you go into a museum or church).

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  3. #13
    MartinCrabtree's Avatar
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    I guess being 6'1" and 275 sure does help. I like to kinda stoop when I get outta the car and slowly stand up. Makes ya look bigger than you are. Never look like a target. Make it look like it's not worth the trouble.

  4. #14
    Jim Taylor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I'll start by encouraging you to use the Canon camera and lens that you have.

    Only you and other photographers know what the price of a used lens might be.

    And a lens is worthless if it isn't with you.
    Totally agree with this. I too have the Elan-II (called the EOS-50 over here) - mine's got the eye controlled focus (useless 'cos I wear glasses).

    It's a great camera to carry around - lightweight, quick to operate and not too expensive should it get lost/stolen/damaged.

    Above all, enjoy!
    Cheers,

    Jim.

  5. #15

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    Jim, Its on my mind to pick up a second Eos-50 as a backup. I do very much like the layout, size and how it fits in my hand compared to my Rebel XT, Eos-350 if i remember correctly. Now with the k1000 on its way, I now have a choice if I want fully manual or AP, AV for the day. I guess it is kinda silly of me to be worried about my prime in retrospect of the cost of other camera and gear people regularly carry. This is my first real, expensive to me lens that i picked up, my pride and joy. Time to stop babying it and take it out.

    As much as for the camera strap, it will cost me a few bucks to make one. berried in my closet is an old light tan cloth belt I never used. The plan is to stop at a fabric shop and pick up two 1.5" rectangular clasps that swivel and have the dog leash style clasp on it and sew them on the ends. The belt is the right length to where it sits comfortably.

  6. #16

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    An old suggestion for carrying valuables in iffy situations is to use a diaper bag. Few diaper bags are stolen.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by zackesch View Post
    I am starting to take my steps into taking my photography a bit more seriously. I would like to start bringing one with me. I have a canon Elan II with a cannon 50 1.4 attached and a K1000 on in the mail. The K1000 was picked up with the intention of being my carry around, not quite comfortable toting around my $400 prime. How do you carry your camera when you are out and about? There are times where I have a messenger bag with me, but I'm a bit uneasy of it being bashed in the bag. On the other hand, I very much like the simple and retro look of the Domke 1" tan strap worn as a sling. My intention is a way to safely carry my camera without screaming photographer.
    As long as you're not carrying the latest prosumer DSLR with it's manufacturer's name emblazoned on the strap, you're probably pretty safe. Street theives only steal what they can spend, snort, drink, smoke, or sell immediately.
    As for worrying about a $400 lens, don't. What's it good for at home?
    For carry bags, you'll have to look around and see what suits you, the smaller the better. Carry the camera around your neck (not shoulder - easy to grab) and a lens and some film in a small bag. I've been through Europe several times and carried less each time.

  8. #18

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    Thanks for your replies. I do now feel a bit safer about having my camera out in the open, and using my pricey "to me" lens in public.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I'll start by encouraging you to use the Canon camera and lens that you have.

    Only you and other photographers know what the price of a used lens might be.

    And a lens is worthless if it isn't with you.

    And $400.00 is a tiny sum compared to what a huge number of photographers are carrying around now.

    And if your camera doesn't look like an expensive digital camera, most thieves probably aren't interested.

    All of which is to say: it should be a rare circumstance indeed where you should leave your camera or lens behind because of its monetary value - at least not at this price point.

    Getting back to your otherwise excellent question - I prefer to keep cameras and lenses and accessories and film in multi-purpose camera bags that I carry over my shoulder. I would caution you though that many of us here suffer from an affliction that is closely related to the dreaded G.A.S. (Gear Acquisition Syndrome).

    That affliction is known by several names, but I tend to refer to it as "camerabag-itis". It manifests itself by causing photographers to own way too many camera bags. You will know you are a sufferer when you have empty or near empty bags, but are still looking for that one, single bag that meets all your needs.

    We sufferers can be seen moving camera bodies, lenses, accessories and film from bag, to bag, to bag ...

    And spending inordinate amounts of time searching the bags we have for the accessory we are sure we had stored with that lens or this body.

    Seeing all the bags I have and noting the space they tend to consume, my wife has threatened an intervention, but so far I've been able to dissuade her.

    Good luck resisting the urge.
    How true how true.

    Years ago when I was a young man I too wanted to carry my camera everywhere. I found out as time went on that in my daily life I (1. never had time to actually use it and it became a handbag or (2. the same drudgery of the common route didn't offer any possibilities outside the mundane in suburbia. So now I only take it when I make plans to go someplace specific during the week either after work, on the way to, or back from a job being self employed. On the weekends it's a different deal because you can pass by spots of interest and take the time to explore, so a pack with a couple of lenses and some filters isn't that bad especially if you don't have to leave it in a 100+ degree or more vehicle. For a real carry tho my choice was a P&S in a belt bag. Not surprisingly 99+% of my best shots were planned photo excursions, visiting or out with friends and family or trips to the shore.
    W.A. Crider

  10. #20
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    Ah yes -- the simple question that can't be answered!

    I have a fairly old Lowepro Micro Trekker that holds most of my Canon FD gear (an A-1 and 3 or 4 FD lenses plus some miscellany). I also have a more recent Lowepro Computrekker that can contain most of my Bronica SQ-A gear -- only problem is I could probably not carry it more than 200 yards full! In both cases, I use those backpacks mostly for storage. In use I tend toward a not necessarily photo specific shoulder bag or fanny pack -- or just a strap around my neck -- depending on what I view as the needs for a specific day/project. I sometimes use one of a couple of non-photo shoulder bags ("man bags") to one of which I've added a bit of padding. In the dusty archives is an assortment of pretty conventional "gadget" bags, some going back about 40 years.. And yes friends, I still find myself eyeballing new bags now and again.

    I have a Tamron pouch, part of a modular series, that can hang on a regular belt. It will pretty much fit my Ercona II 6x9 folder (and little else). It can alternatively fit my Perkeo II 6x6 folder plus a Gossen Digisix, filter or two, and two or three rolls of film.

    I also have a Think Tank "Urban Disguise 30" -- a nice non-camera-obvious bag. That can carry a fair amount of stuff, but getting larger things in and out can be a bit tedious because it has a zippered slot, not a liftable lid. I also own a Think Tank "Digital Holster 20" which I sometimes use to carry digits, but it also fits other SLRs (and is pretty obviously camera related).

    And then there's a 4x5 press camera, a 4x5 pinhole camera and an 8x10 pinhole camera -- those I try to find subjects near where I can park the car!

    So basically, in my opinion, there's no answer!
    I was once going to buy Urban Disguise 30 bag Dave, until my wife said " it looks like a laptop bag Ben, and you are more likely to get mugged if they think you have a laptop than your film cameras"
    Ben

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