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  1. #21
    mweintraub's Avatar
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    Shallow DOF (which you call Bokeh) is produced a few ways. DOF is controlled by the following: Film size, subject distance, focal length, and aperture. Of course with your camera, you can't change the film size. Ok, now you have the others to work with.
    The longer the lens used (more telephoto), the shallower the DOF.
    The larger the aperture used (smaller #), the shallower the DOF.
    The closer the subject, the shallow the DOF.

    Even if you get, lets say, a 50mm 1.8 lens and shoot at f8 or smaller, you won't get the shallow DOF you desire.

    Now, if you want to shoot at f/1.8, remember that's going to allow a lot of light in so in bright sunlight you'll need a very fast shutter speed. This FM10's max shutter speed might not be fast enough to do this. You'll have to either use a Neutra Density (ND) filter or use a smaller aperture.

  2. #22

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    Bokeh is a term pretty loosely used among most fuzzygraphers.
    It came from Japan and refers to the quality of the OOF areas there are many kinds of bokeh. It may help to do some searching on the web to find something referring to these original terms.
    There are "double line", "swirly" and several more that elude me at the moment. With double line you will have a subject with a 2nd general outline of the subject. There are many examples of swirly over on the Large Format forum if you search for "petzval"

    The longer lens suggested will give a more pronounced separation between subject and background using shallow DOF at longer focal lengths. Typically this out of focus is considered bokeh but whether it's pleasant or not depends on the lens itself having "good" or "bad" bokeh not film size, focal length or the value of absolute zero.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  3. #23

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    Just a hint on using primes....to use most of the negative/sensor area....

    When using 24/35/50/85/105/135 primes......

    Each longer Focal Length's longer dimension (e.g. the 50mm's horizontal in landscape mode) is just about about the SHORTER dimension (vertical in landscape mode) of the next shorter/wider FL (35mm)....

    Sooooo....when using the wider prime (e.g. 35mm) in horizontal/landscape mode and you find that your framed photo is the vertical/middle section of the horizontal, THAT is the clue to shift to the next longer FL (50mm) to use THAT prime in a VERTICAL/PORTRAIT mode to make use of most of the negative/sensor...

    Primes work best with 2 bodies over your shoulders so you can switch quickly and not miss the shot...when using zooms the same technique applies of course for getting the most out of your grain/pixels...so you don't have to enlarge/crop as much and lose IQ in the process.

    Good luck and good shooting....

  4. #24
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitanikon View Post
    Just a hint on using primes....to use most of the negative/sensor area....

    When using 24/35/50/85/105/135 primes......

    Each longer Focal Length's longer dimension (e.g. the 50mm's horizontal in landscape mode) is just about about the SHORTER dimension (vertical in landscape mode) of the next shorter/wider FL (35mm)....

    Sooooo....when using the wider prime (e.g. 35mm) in horizontal/landscape mode and you find that your framed photo is the vertical/middle section of the horizontal, THAT is the clue to shift to the next longer FL (50mm) to use THAT prime in a VERTICAL/PORTRAIT mode to make use of most of the negative/sensor...
    No, that's the clue to either move closer or change the composition. FL change will result in a perspective and visual depth change.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #25
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    On this we agree.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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