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  1. #21
    mweintraub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kruger View Post
    I was also wondering why do they sell those lomo cams for like 300 dollars when you can use that money to get an entry level dSLR or a Nikon F or something like that. Especially since you can find other lomo cameras on eBay for 10 dollars, even though I doubt that they work or something.
    They sell them because people buy it. They wouldn't ask that much if they didn't sell.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by mweintraub View Post
    They sell them because people buy it. They wouldn't ask that much if they didn't sell.
    As with the old saying, "A fool and his money are soon parted."
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #23
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    Gerald- what, exactly, do you have against plastic cameras?

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kruger View Post
    Thanks a lot for your feedback guys as well as the example picture. I know I just got the SLR and just focus on it but it's a bad (or maybe good?) side of my personality that when I get into something new I want to know EVERYTHING. And it sometimes slows me down.

    I was also wondering why do they sell those lomo cams for like 300 dollars when you can use that money to get an entry level dSLR or a Nikon F or something like that. Especially since you can find other lomo cameras on eBay for 10 dollars, even though I doubt that they work or something.

    Also what is a Pinhole camera ? Is the Vivitar shown above a Pinhole camera ? If I understood correctly there are Pinhole lenses for Nikons like mine ?
    I think that for $300 Lomo sells the Bel Aire which is a medium format folder 6X12 with I think a glass lens. The Holgas and Dianas are 40 to 80 range I beleive. Film photography podcast sells their version for $20 but is only 645.

    As far as pinhole lenses for your Nikon the easiest is to get a good solid black body cap and drill a 1/4 or 1/2 inch hole in it. Then get a brass shim or a piece of pop can and punch a needle (do not remember the best size) into the shim. Tape and or glue this onto the inside of the body cap so that the hole you drilled is totally covered by the shim. You now have a body cap. If you use the specified needle rather than one at random it is easy on line to find the f stop for it as the focal length would be around 45 or 46 mm.

    Holgas and their ilk do work, they do what they are supposed to. Not much to go wrong with them other than a spring break. I think one can start using a Holga whenever they want and not have to master a slr first, some people get hooked on film through their Holga experience while others are proficient photographers who wish to go lo tech. Neither route is right or wrong as in not wishing to try it at all. Its all about doing what you want to do.

  5. #25
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    I always found it interesting when I took photography we all startd with a K1000 and they focused a few weeks in the photographic triangle (ISO, aperture and f stop), then we got to the darkroom and started making Rayograms (aka photograms). I now wonder why they didn't start the camera part with a plastic P&S so we would load some 100 iso film, shoot it in all light then bring em to the darkroom and realize what the affect of shooting in "good light" vs say an indoor night shot would have on the final product.......then go onto learning the SLR and printing.....

    Part of me thinks that learning cameras lo fi (ala plastic camera) forces one to really learn the magic photographic triangle than handing K1000 or base SLR and going for broke....

    Why is darkroom taught from the ground up (Rayograms to say 4x5 contact prints) but the camera part is at, what I would consider, looking back, a different manner...

    Anyway like Red Rock says above....one can have at it either way, both are correct! Enjoy the ride, analog photography is a great life long pursuit
    Andy

  6. #26
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    I now wonder why they didn't start the camera part with a plastic P&S so we would load some 100 iso film, shoot it in all light then bring em to the darkroom and realize what the affect of shooting in "good light" vs say an indoor night shot would have on the final product...
    Some did. Before it was cool, Diana's were purchased by the carton for high school students. Source: Photography teacher friend of my dad's.

  7. #27
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    I have a Holga. It wasn't crappy enough so I baked it in the oven a little bit. I also have a very nice 8x10 inch view camera with lenses that cost the GDP of some third world countries. I enjoy using them both. People who run down a particular method of photography generally don't know much about photography.

    Hint... It ain't about cameras.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by redrockcoulee View Post

    As far as pinhole lenses for your Nikon the easiest is to get a good solid black body cap and drill a 1/4 or 1/2 inch hole in it. Then get a brass shim or a piece of pop can and punch a needle (do not remember the best size) into the shim. Tape and or glue this onto the inside of the body cap so that the hole you drilled is totally covered by the shim. You now have a body cap. If you use the specified needle rather than one at random it is easy on line to find the f stop for it as the focal length would be around 45 or 46 mm.

    .
    I've been thinking about doing that with a DSLR. I'm a machinist so the hole will be precise. If I like the way it works there we may move on to film.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    Gerald- what, exactly, do you have against plastic cameras?
    It has nothing to do with plastic cameras per se. I just don't understand lomography and the idea of purposely taking a bad photograph. Some of these plastic cameras were perfectly dreadful with all sorts of light leaks, lens distortions, etc. There are some older plastic cameras that take creditable photographs. But Lomo was to me a ripoff. I have a Brownie Hawkeye 620 that I occasionally use when I am feeling nostalgic.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    It has nothing to do with plastic cameras per se. I just don't understand lomography and the idea of purposely taking a bad photograph. Some of these plastic cameras were perfectly dreadful with all sorts of light leaks, lens distortions, etc. There are some older plastic cameras that take creditable photographs. But Lomo was to me a ripoff. I have a Brownie Hawkeye 620 that I occasionally use when I am feeling nostalgic.
    That is just it, the images may be bad technically in your mind but that does not make them bad pictures anymore than a pinhole or a zone plate image is a bad image. If you do not understand it why knock those of us who do understand and do enjoy them. The worse of the putting down those who use them is that some may have come to APUG and reading that they are fools etc will not stay and why should they if you make a point of ridiculing them. Our lomo type cameas were all gifts from me to my wife as that is what she wanted, and she has shot LF and has a SWC etc but perhaps as she has a fine art background in printmaking and new media that she does not understand that images must be as sharp as possible to be acceptable

    Perhaps you should look at a few issues of Light Leak to try to learn what others appreciate in low fi photography and it is different then the results you get in using an old Hawkeye or Baby Brownie Special. Some times a sharp image does not record the mood or scene as faithfully as a low fi image. No one expects you to like them or even appreciate lomo images but please do not dish those who do, especially with guests and new comers

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