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  1. #21
    Mark Feldstein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp498 View Post
    If you need something forgiving, don't be using slide film.

    And Chan Tran added" "But if it was say Ektar 100 or a 100 ISO color negative film then it's actually worst because color negative film has no tolerance for underexposure."

    Actually, I beg to differ with both statements.
    Forgiving or not, e-6 films have a fairly wide exposure latitude that can be realized through correct processing, i.e., pushing and pulling the film. When exposures errors are made that can't be corrected completely in the procesing, in urgent situations, dupes can be made on Ektachrome Duplication film to increase and decrease contrast, boost some (though not much) detail in shadows while holding the highlights areas during processing of that film, and a couple of other helpful tricks.

    This usually isn't such a big deal if the entire roll suffered the same maladies. The problem is compounded when you have a whole roll of various subjects that's been misexposed. Then once you find your set up for correcting one frame, you have to find it with just about all of them and that's a real time-consuming process altough doable.

    As to Color stock, it's very versatile stuff. As I said earlier, a good printer should be able to get excellent print quality from a negative that's under or over exposed four stops either way. Ask someone in a professional grade color processing lab. In fact, most pros shoot C-41 film at least one full stop over to get better color saturation, and I sometimes go 1 1/2 stops over shooting agriculture products. That's used to be particularly true of Vericolor S (exposed at 80-100 instead of 160ISO) and others. But you should experiment and match your processing (or lab) to the film and use their recommendations as well.
    Mark
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    Without guys like John Coltrane, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, life....would be meaningless.

  2. #22
    Mark Feldstein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp498 View Post
    If you need something forgiving, don't be using slide film.

    And Chan Tran added" "But if it was say Ektar 100 or a 100 ISO color negative film then it's actually worst because color negative film has no tolerance for underexposure."

    Actually, I beg to differ with both statements.
    Forgiving or not, e-6 films have a fairly wide exposure latitude that can be realized through correct processing, i.e., pushing and pulling the film. When exposures errors are made that can't be corrected completely in the procesing, in urgent situations, dupes can be made on Ektachrome Duplication film to increase and decrease contrast, boost some (though not much) detail in shadows while holding the highlights areas during processing of that film, and a couple of other helpful tricks.

    This usually isn't such a big deal if the entire roll suffered the same maladies. The problem is compounded when you have a whole roll of various subjects that's been misexposed. Then once you find your set up for correcting one frame, you have to find it with just about all of them and that's a real time-consuming process altough doable.

    As to Color stock, it's very versatile stuff. As I said earlier, a good printer should be able to get excellent print quality from a negative that's under or over exposed four stops either way. Ask someone in a professional grade color processing lab. In fact, most pros shoot C-41 film at least one full stop over to get better color saturation, and I sometimes go 1 1/2 stops over shooting agriculture products. That's used to be particularly true of Vericolor S (exposed at 80-100 instead of 160ISO) and others. But you should experiment and match your processing (or lab) to the film and use their recommendations as well.
    Mark
    _________________________________
    Without guys like John Coltrane, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, life....would be meaningless.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Feldstein View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jp498 View Post
    If you need something forgiving, don't be using slide film.

    And Chan Tran added" "But if it was say Ektar 100 or a 100 ISO color negative film then it's actually worst because color negative film has no tolerance for underexposure."

    Actually, I beg to differ with both statements.
    Forgiving or not, e-6 films have a fairly wide exposure latitude that can be realized through correct processing, i.e., pushing and pulling the film. When exposures errors are made that can't be corrected completely in the procesing, in urgent situations, dupes can be made on Ektachrome Duplication film to increase and decrease contrast, boost some (though not much) detail in shadows while holding the highlights areas during processing of that film, and a couple of other helpful tricks.

    This usually isn't such a big deal if the entire roll suffered the same maladies. The problem is compounded when you have a whole roll of various subjects that's been misexposed. Then once you find your set up for correcting one frame, you have to find it with just about all of them and that's a real time-consuming process altough doable.

    As to Color stock, it's very versatile stuff. As I said earlier, a good printer should be able to get excellent print quality from a negative that's under or over exposed four stops either way. Ask someone in a professional grade color processing lab. In fact, most pros shoot C-41 film at least one full stop over to get better color saturation, and I sometimes go 1 1/2 stops over shooting agriculture products. That's used to be particularly true of Vericolor S (exposed at 80-100 instead of 160ISO) and others. But you should experiment and match your processing (or lab) to the film and use their recommendations as well.
    Mark
    Color negative film when underexposed by 3 stops would look almost clear.

  4. #24
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    what happened???

    Ask for a clip test and start with 3 stop push.
    A clip test is where the lab tech will clip a few frames without exposing the rest of the roll to ambient light and processing those few frames for inspection and to determine how to proceed with the bulk of the film.

  5. #25
    Mark Feldstein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    Color negative film when underexposed by 3 stops would look almost clear.
    And you're speaking from how much experience with professionally printing underexposed C-41 negatives and on what kind of equipment ?
    M.
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    Without guys like John Coltrane, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, life....would be meaningless.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Feldstein View Post
    And you're speaking from how much experience with professionally printing underexposed C-41 negatives and on what kind of equipment ?
    M.
    In fact I have run accross negative with about 3 stops underexposure but I never attempt to print them as I can't see much on the film.

  7. #27
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    in case this was missed :

    Has the film been processed yet? If not I'm happy to suggest something that will give you an extremely good result by modifying the E-6 process chemically, feel free to private message me.

    -Steve @ The Lighthouse Lab.
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  8. #28
    Mark Feldstein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    In fact I have run accross negative with about 3 stops underexposure but I never attempt to print them as I can't see much on the film.
    Not to be (too) argumentative, but maybe it'd be worthwhile investing in some paper, making some test strips, experimenting and seeing what you actually CAN get out of a severely underexposed (or overexposed) negative on C-41 film.
    M.
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    Without guys like John Coltrane, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, life....would be meaningless.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    in case this was missed :

    Has the film been processed yet? If not I'm happy to suggest something that will give you an extremely good result by modifying the E-6 process chemically, feel free to private message me.

    -Steve @ The Lighthouse Lab.
    So what do you change to help this out?

  10. #30
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    P.M sent Sage
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

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