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  1. #1

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    Accidentally super lowered ISO of a slide film, very sad, can it be pushed ?

    Hello everyone,

    I'm very depressed since this week end. We went with some friends on an awesome week end and I took pictures all day with a Kodak Ektachrome 100 ISO roll (slide film). All day I was building up the eagerness to see them later when I'll process them. But when I got back to the hotel, a sudden dread got me, I remembered I had played around with the ISO setting on the camera recently. I went to see it and noticed that, as I feared, it was on 1000 ISO and not 100 ISO. During the day it was exceptionnally sunny, very sunny, like eye burning sunny, so I though it was the sun that made my light meter always saying it was over exposed. So I took most of my pictures with 8, 11, 16 or 22 apertures and shutter speeds of 500, 1000, or 2000, but mostly 1000 and 2000.

    It depressed me the whole way back and the whole day yesterday. I know I bought an analog camera that is fully manual to discover photography, I just thought the lesson wasn't going that unforgiving. I'll maybe never return to that town in my life.

    Is there anyway that the roll could be pushed to hell to get the images or do you think the film simply didn't get any light ? I know that it would require very heavy pushing, i'm ok with that, it might turn up cool or very abstract, I just don't want to have nothing since I barely used my compact digital camera that day.

    Thanks for your inputs guys !

  2. #2
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear this. How many rolls do you have, and do you develop by yourself?

  3. #3

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    That would be slighty over a 3 stop push, quite a lot, but I understand films like Provia 400X can handle that, I'm not sure about Ektachrome.

    If I were you, I'd try taking one of the rolls to a pro lab and explain the situation, they might be more salvageable than you think. On the web, it seems a 2 stop push might be viable, and then you're only one stop under, which is not as bad as you might think.

    Talk to a lab, and try push processing one of them, you might just get away with it. Good luck.

  4. #4

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    Hi,

    Thanks for your replies, you brightened up my day lol ! So you think the film still could have stored some image information ?

    The thing is I am in India and the only guy that can process slide films is in Ahmadabad and I'm in Bangalore, he's all to the north, and I'm in the south lol. He is pretty good I heard and a lot of pros send him stuff to process, including slides. He does it in his own house I heard.

    So what should I do ? 3 stops or just 2 stops ? The thing is that if 2 stop is not enough I'm screwed and I'll really see nothing right ?

    Also Thegman, you were basing your explanation on 400 iso film right ? Cause the one I used is only 100 iso.
    Darkosaric, I have this problem with one roll and unfortunately I'm still learning photography so I don't know how to process myself (I looked into it of course but I didn't try it).

    Also in this link where somebody has the same problem, someone in the posts below quotes a tech sheet from Fuji saying 4 stops. What do you guys think ?
    http://photo.net/black-and-white-pho...g-forum/00XpPi

    Thanks for your time and help guys !

    PS: Also I just got confused. Can we say I underexposed the film or is it the contrary ? since 1000 iso would mean more reactive film, but I'm thinking the iso knob is just to let the light meter know that I have a 100 iso film or something else in there, and therefore base its calculations on that, so by "believing" the light meter and always choosing fast shutter speeds and small apertures I was effectively under exposing my film and therefore need to push it not pull it right ?
    Thanks !
    Last edited by Kruger; 07-30-2013 at 08:37 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5

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    Hi Kruger, I based my explanation on your ISO 100 film, if you exposed it at 1000 ISO, then that is underexposed, you work out the number of stops by doubling the ISO number, i.e.:

    100 > 200 > 400 > 800

    1000 is close enough to 800, so that means it's 3 stops underexposed. I would probably go for a 3 stop push, but you may want to talk to your lab guy.

    A two stop push would leave your shots underexposed by 1 stop, which some people do on purpose to get more saturation on slide film.

    Talk to the lab, see what they think.

  6. #6
    jp498's Avatar
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    If you need something forgiving, don't be using slide film.

  7. #7

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    @ thegman, thanks for the explanation. But then why do they recommend 4 stops to this other guy which had the same problem (100iso exposed at 1000 iso). What do you think ?

    @ jp498, I wanted to explore what slide film could give, and it's cheap here. so why not. The error I made had nothing to do with using slide film or negative film.

  8. #8

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    Ignorance

    Quote Originally Posted by jp498 View Post
    If you need something forgiving, don't be using slide film.
    That's just about the most rude, clueless comment I've read here in ages. Jesus. He made a mistake, he wasn't expecting forgiveness in his film.

    I don't know what the E-6 situation is in India but you could get an E-6 kit (they cost $20 in the US) and develop yourself. The Tetenal kit comes with instructions on pushing (1 or 2 stops, I believe) so you could extrapolate a bit for 3 stops. That's about the only guaranteed way to do this. Trusting it to a lab is fine, if you have a good reliable lab. If not, it could get processed "regular" by mistake and you'd have very dark images.

    Good luck!
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  9. #9
    vpwphoto's Avatar
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    3 stops is A LOT. How much are you a bracketer? If you go making similar photos at 2 and 3 stop increments, I might go for a 1 stop push and cross fingers.
    Either way you are in for some "happy accidents" but mostly inferior results. Sorry to be harsh, but 3 stops in error is a lot. I for instance know the 1000th of a second at f4 is a common daylight or late day calculation I use with 100 speed chrome.... so my experience would have made me realize a meter reading of say 1/1000 at f8 to be suspect!!!

  10. #10
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    Because of the way slides work, I think no matter what you'll have very dark images. ISO 1000 is roughly 3 1/4 stops push from 100. Rounding off the 1/4 is fine - in this case it won't make a difference. I think one reason why there's not much information about pushing slide film three or more stops is that it is generally unadvisable. One reason why it is considered unadvisable is that with that big of a push, you will almost certainly get color shifts, and you'll also have detail-less shadow areas (and a lot more of them) no matter what you do at that point, because of the way transparency films work. Transparency films work by dye destruction - they get thinner and brighter the more you expose them. If you over-expose a slide, there is no possible way to salvage it because the information is just gone. Conversely, if you under-expose a little, you increase the saturation of colors and deepen your shadows. If you grossly underexpose, you have solid blacks that have no detail. I wish you the best of luck with it, and I hope you can salvage some images.

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