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  1. #1
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Do you trust viewfinder focusing?

    By viewfinder focusing I mean the orientation on the certer of the viewfinder frame which tells when the spot is in focus.

    I don't normally use glasses but to photograph with manual focus cameras I have to use glasses if I want my photos well focused. The thing is that I don't like using glasses for street photographs. I always feel the glasses are on my WAY specially when it get dirt.

    So now I am shooting a roll without glasses and therefore I use the spot orientation on the viewfinder to focus instead of using my eyes. But since it will take a while until I finish the roll and see if it really works I would like to hear those who have tried and can say how good they are.

    I am enjoy a lot to shoot in the streets without glasses.

  2. #2
    clayne's Avatar
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    What kind of camera are we talking here?
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  3. #3
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Nikon F3HP and Nikon FM.

  4. #4
    clayne's Avatar
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    Alright, for the F3HP, I highly recommend you go out and find a type H2 screen. The entire screen is a microprism meaning it's no longer about the center at all.

    Unfortunately mir.com.my is down, and this is the best I can find: http://www2.webster.edu/acadaffairs/...ikonF3User.pdf
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #5
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by marciofs View Post
    By viewfinder focusing I mean the orientation on the center of the viewfinder frame which tells when the spot is in focus.
    Do you refer to focusing aids like split-image or micrprisms (often installed in the center of a groundglass viewfinder)?

  6. #6
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Fit a dioptric correction lens to your viewfinder eyepiece. Apart from using a viewfinder magnifier and/or progressively larger corrections in order to see the "sweet spot" clearly, dioptric corrections are the cheapest and most effective way to compensate for eyes if you don't like wearing glasses (that's me!). Most viewfinders can also be accurately focused using the matte surround, something I often do with the Pentax 67 in poor light. Depth of field will take care of slight imperfections in focus.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  7. #7

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    If you aren't going to use your glasses (which is the whole point of having an F3HP, so I find that part confusing), then buy a diopter for the camera(s).

    As an eyeglass wearer, I often use a Nikon N8008s (which has no focus screen aid whatsoever other than just looking to see if the image is sharp) rather than my usual manual focus cameras because it has a focus confirmation light in the viewfinder. It's pretty easy to mis-focus a little and get soft shots if I'm in a hurry and shooting wide open on my other cameras, but by keeping my eye peeled for that little light in the corner to pop on, I can concentrate on framing and squeeze off the shot quickly.
    Last edited by momus; 08-21-2013 at 03:43 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Do you refer to focusing aids like split-image or micrprisms (often installed in the center of a groundglass viewfinder)?
    Exactly.

    I also have tried to focus without looking into the viewfinder but looking at the distance of the subject. And it is easier with wide angle lenses. But I will only know if it works ok after finish the film roll.

  9. #9

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    Out of my film MF cameras the only 3 bodies i trust the viewfinder focusing are: Mamiya RZII, Mamiya 7 and Fujica GSW690III, i don't trust my Hassy 501CM yet because i it takes me several seconds to trust the focus for one shot, while with the first three i mentioned i can focus in 1-3 seconds at most and always spot on.

  10. #10
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    Not quite sure whether this helps in the understanding but so many movies have been shot with mirror reflex cameras and shown in theatres without complaints about accurate focussing. A film motion-picture camera has a revolving mirror shutter unlike a SLR still camera that has it on hinges. The groundglass then is removable/exchangeable, so also needs an exact positioning.

    After an adventure with the repair of a Pathé WEBO M, a small gauge movie camera, where prisms and lenses are tucked in with cork pieces and the like, I appreciate everything else. Basically, every camera can be adjusted, if a groundglass image is not in focus at flange focal distance. I mean, at least to me, that is the point of a reflex viewing system. If in doubt, have a camera checked by a pro. And the result given to you on paper

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