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  1. #1

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    My new Nikon 105mm F2.5 Nikkor-P.C has stardust

    I'm not much of a collector of gear...at least not intentionally....but, well, this lens had been on Craigslist for a few weeks and I finally caved...
    It has the same optical formula and coating as the AIS...apparently the differently configured aperture leaves may affect the bokeh differently than the AIS and I'll be testing that....
    ...what I've always wanted to do was to compare this version's long-throw focusing to the shorter throw of the AIS version I have...to see which version is easier for me to lock focus.

    It's very clean, inside and out....except for the "stardust" you can see here.
    I've been told it's condensation...looks like it...but it appears to be permanent...hopefully it has little affect....

    Can anyone explain how to remove the front element to get behind it and clean off the droplets....?



    ...one reason to "bag" this lens is that I have two of the others in this "family"....the 200 being the last lens I own from my 1960s PJ days...


  2. #2

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    Do they affect the picture quality? I would guess they would not, and you would be at much greater risk taking the lens apart for introducing more dust or misaligning the element.

    For a good test on how eh.... "small" imperfections affect image quality, see here:

    http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2008...ment-scratches

    And here:

    http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2011...e-of-lens-dust

    It takes a pretty big "flaw" in a lens to show up on an image

    Enjoy the lens I always wanted to play with one of those!

  3. #3
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    You mean they didn't charge you extra for the "Stardust" ?, because on eBay they would have called it vintage stardust.
    Ben

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitanikon View Post
    .......Can anyone explain how to remove the front element to get behind it and clean off the droplets....?
    I've never worked on this vintage Nikkor, but most lenses of this era are built the same way. The trim ring will have to be removed first. Since there are no spanner slots, you'll have to use a sink-stopper of the right diameter to unscrew the ring. Once the trim ring is off, you'll probably see another ring with a pair of spanner slots. Unscrew this ring using a lens spanner and you should have access to the front element (just turn the lens over and it should drop out). Cleaning should be an easy. Don't worry about aligning the element, it will drop into its own little "well" so there's no chance of putting it in the wrong way. Follow the reverse procedure to reassemble the lens, and you should be good to go.

    Jim B.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    You mean they didn't charge you extra for the "Stardust" ?, because on eBay they would have called it vintage stardust.
    Or..."lens with rare cosmic pixie dust...."

    Thanks for the replies....I will use it first before taking any "repair" measures...as you can imagine I had to align the light just so to highlight the droplets...and so it may not be much of a problem...
    ...thanks again

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitanikon View Post
    It's very clean, inside and out....except for the "stardust" you can see here.
    I've been told it's condensation...looks like it...
    I hope it wasn't a professional lens technician that said it's condensation. It most certainly isn't. If a lens had sufficient moisture to create 'droplets' of condensation, you'd have an entire colony of fungus sprouting-up all over. I was told by a lens tech the flaws are located in the optical cement. I have lenses with the same oddities and they perform well.

  7. #7
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Slap a good hood on there and shoot away. I doubt you'll see any strong evidence of the "stardust" under typical shooting conditions. Maybe some if you shoot into the sun or shoot at night with strong street lights or something...

    Awesome lens by the way. Perhaps my favorite Nikkor lens.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  8. #8
    f/16's Avatar
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    I have the exact same lens. It has some dust inside, but not quite as bad as yours. I've never noticed degraded image quality-it's a fine lens. Just shoot away with it and don't worry about it unless you notice excessive flare or other degraded quality.
    Bill

    Pentax 645, Pentax 6X7MLU, and many Nikons-F2 Photomic F2AS FM2N N2000 N6000 N6006 Nikomat FTN

  9. #9
    resummerfield's Avatar
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    I have an 85mm f1.8 from about 1975 and a 105mm f2.5 from 1971, and they both exhibit the "stardust" in your picture. On very close examination I think it is in the glass, and can not be removed. I've used my two lenses for years and years without even noticing the "stardust", and have never noticed any problem with the images. I would leave it alone.
    —Eric

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by resummerfield View Post
    On very close examination I think it is in the glass, and can not be removed.
    ...which would seem to indicate a flaw in the manufacturing process and would have been immediately apparent coming-off the production line. I doubt Nikon would release such glass on the market. The key words here, 'in the glass' as opposed to on the surface or between elements.

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