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  1. #21
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    The guy just wants to look at his negatives to see which he likes before he sends them to a lab to enlarge, not a science project.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 08-24-2013 at 10:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  2. #22
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Just laying out the options.

    A normal 50mm SLR lens makes a very good Loupe as well.

    I looked at many negs last night through my B&L StereoZoom 4 last night thanks to this thread.

    So if nobody got anything useful from the thread, at least it helped me push forward what I wanted to do last night...

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    The guy just wants to look at his negatives to see which he likes before he sends them to a lab to enlarge, not a science project.
    Well, he just might want to know if they're sharp or not. And there are many options for that. He may want a good look at the negative only, rather than going to the trouble and expense of having it printed. He may need to sort out whether it's a mushy negative or a sloppy lab that's responsible for an unsharp print...

  4. #24
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Well, he just might want to know if they're sharp or not. And there are many options for that. He may want a good look at the negative only, rather than going to the trouble and expense of having it printed. He may need to sort out whether it's a mushy negative or a sloppy lab that's responsible for an unsharp print...
    And can't you tell with a good loupe and a light box ?
    Ben

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    And can't you tell with a good loupe and a light box ?

    I hope so because this is what I would go for.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    And can't you tell with a good loupe and a light box ?
    Of course I can. But I have a good loupe and lightbox.

  7. #27
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    The inexpensive Loupe that Benjiboy showed you earlier in this thread... Is well-suited to the job of checking negatives for sharpness... It's a good value until you decide if you need something better... It will have "fringing" and other minor aberrations that will not matter for the purpose of judging how good the negative is, even if you might one day appreciate a finer-quality optic. You will be fine with it.

  8. #28

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    I'd say start with a simple and less expensive method, which will be a loupe and a light box. It may be sufficient for OP or may not be. It all depends on one's needs, expectations, and also vision.

    It will NOT be a waste of money to have a good loupe and a light box anyway, as long as one is involved in analog photography.

    What a microscope allows one to do is to have a better look at a negative. Something that look suspicious/doubtful with 8x or 10x loupe will be awfully obvious when one cranks the scope up to 40x. One time, I found a long thin scratch going across a negative. With my loupe, I could see this scratch suddenly ends. With a 40x scope, I found a little particle embedded at the end of this scratch. So, apparently, a little dust/stone got dragged across the film as it traveled through the camera.... Without a scope and finding of this particle, I'll be wondering what the heck caused it.

    One caution with this is that at 40x looking at a 35mm negative, one is basically looking at the image as if it is blown up to almost 60 inches wide! Almost all images appear un-sharp and grainy! At 10x, it will be 15 inches wide equivalent.

    Like anything else, it does require some understanding and skill to use it effectively.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #29
    Patrick Robert James's Avatar
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    You guys sure know how to complicate the crap out of things!

    I use a Fuji flat (1/2 inch thick) lightbox that I got from them for using so much film, and I have several different loupes. The one I use the most is the front lens group of a 80-200 f/4ish that was jammed. Killer loupe that cost next to nothing. It is large enough that I can keep both my eyes open looking at negs from a decent distance, about a foot.

    In reality, anything can work. If your negs are sleeved, you can hold them against a window and use a magnifying glass. There is no need to get overly complicated.

  10. #30
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Robert James View Post
    You guys sure know how to complicate the crap out of things!

    I use a Fuji flat (1/2 inch thick) lightbox that I got from them for using so much film, and I have several different loupes. The one I use the most is the front lens group of a 80-200 f/4ish that was jammed. Killer loupe that cost next to nothing. It is large enough that I can keep both my eyes open looking at negs from a decent distance, about a foot.

    In reality, anything can work. If your negs are sleeved, you can hold them against a window and use a magnifying glass. There is no need to get overly complicated.
    Exactly my point, suddenly for a member who is obviously new to film photography seeing if his negatives. are sharp enough to send to a lab to enlarge becomes a science project involving microscopes is I think a little excessive.
    Ben

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