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  1. #21
    donkee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Goodman View Post
    Or you could purchase the #675 adapter I've made for years and support an APUG member at the same time: http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-111.html (you can see it midway down on my friend Rick Oleson's page). Unlike the slip-on washer approach, mine will place the zinc-air cell at the proper height every time. It is still $14 and that includes free shipping to anywhere and a lifetime guarantee. A small 100% neoprene ring keeps the cell centered in the adapter and the design prevents any damage to your camera from a malfunction of the zinc-air cell. Also, unlike the adapter mentioned above, mine is guaranteed to be infinitely stackable (try to stack Wein cells or the battery adapter above...you'll discover the top cell will be intermittent at best and may not work at all).
    Please email me at jon_goodman@yahoo.com if you're interested.
    Jon
    Jon, you have supplied me with seal kits for all my 35mm SLRs and Mamiya C220. Ssoon I'll be hitting you up for kits for my Bronica SQ backs> Might as well tack on a couple adapters too! The lazy way works but the right way is usually better.

  2. #22

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    As others have suggested, it's very simple to make a little 'O' ring for your battery w/ anything at hand. Wire, balled up tinfoil, pinched up paper or cardboard, a washer, etc. It need not be exact, just good enough to keep the battery from shifting.

    When you get back home, save yourself a LOT of future grief by buying one of those cheap multi meters that accurately measure voltage. I bought mine eons ago for $5 and it has taken care of all the guess work. Now I know exactly what the voltage is of any battery at any time, an invaluable thing. Sometimes even new batteries are flat, so you need to know that if it occurs. Also, some cameras are real fussy about voltage, while others work fine w/ "close enough". For now, sunny 16.

  3. #23
    Jon Goodman's Avatar
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    Thanks guys! You know I always appreciate the support for my various (two at this point) projects. Oh, plus the camera leather kits. I still have some of those left and I'm about to lower the price yet again.

    About the multimeter, if you find one of the old style with a needle, it can be a good thing to have and at some point it will probably save you some money and allow you to perform some home repair magic. Those old meters are terrific for checking capacitors. You can tell in an instant if they're working or not. If your air or heating fan goes out or if a motor in your clothes dryer or washing machine stops working, it is a wise idea to check the capacitor first. The weakest link and the thing that will frequently cause an AC motor to stop working is either the start capacitor or the run capacitor. Many motors will only use a run capacitor. This is also one of the things that stops your airconditioning compressor from working, too. The start capacitor is like a large bucket of electricity that is fed in one quick dose to your compressor motor to make it start working. Think of it like a Drill Sergeant with big shoe that kicks your tail out of bed. The run capacitor keeps the magnetic fields rotating so the armature will spin. Rather than purchase a new motor or call a serviceman, you might have your motor working fine again with a new capacitor (which will generally cost you $10 or less for a run cap or between $20 and $100 for a start cap...depending on the type of application, voltage, etc). If anyone wants more of an explanation about this, please let me know.
    Jon

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Goodman View Post
    Thanks guys! You know I always appreciate the support for my various (two at this point) projects. Oh, plus the camera leather kits. I still have some of those left and I'm about to lower the price yet again.

    About the multimeter, if you find one of the old style with a needle, it can be a good thing to have and at some point it will probably save you some money and allow you to perform some home repair magic. Those old meters are terrific for checking capacitors. ...
    I'm no expert, but I know that there are some tests that are better with an analog (needle) multimeter. For example, testing the transformers in halogen lighting.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

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