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  1. #61
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    I worked for a small daily newspaper in the early 1960's. I used a 4x5 Speed Graphic with flash and power pack.

    I always got noticed.

    If you wanna get noticed, wear a 4x5 Speed Graphic with flash and power pack.

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    large digital slrs have pretty much destroyed the concept of "candid photography" in the news business. Bring out one of those monsters and people automatically perform.

    Decades ago the dictum of LIFE photographers was that you had to become invisible -- and with a small Leica or Nikon, both very quiet, you could. It is impossible to do so with a massive lensed DSLR, or even a film SLR, and while they do get a lot of different shots than you can with a small rangefinder, the is an intimacy that is lost. LIFE's brilliant photo story by W. Eugene Smith about a day in the life of a country doctor would have been impossible, or at least a lot harder, to shoot by a photographer loaded down with the usual couple of hulking giant lensed cameras.
    Agree with your comments. As an ex-pro who started out when photojournalism was the prevailing influence several decades back, I quit in frustration when the industry shoved digital down our throats. Those first and second generation digi cameras were truly awful. Looking at the excellent W Eugene Smith essay, I would guess all those shots were taken on his Leica using just 35mm & 50mm lenses. An object lesson for those who feel under-equipped without two or three zoom lenses on board.

  3. #63
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I think SLRs attract more negative attention, whereas TLRs attract more positive attention, when people notice them at all. I've seen the hostile stare directed at SLR users far more often, and have had people actively duck out of the way of what they think is what I'm photographing. Shooting with my Rollei, I've never had a negative reaction, just lots of smiles and enthusiastic comments. Out shooting with the large/ultra large format stuff, that really draws a lot of attention and I often spend as much if not more time explaining about the camera and doing demos as I do taking photos.

  4. #64

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    It's partly the size of the front element, and partly the nature of the camera. An SLR typically has a large 'eye', and who wants to be stared at by one of those? SLRs say serious in a way a point and shoot never will. If people think they're being captured on an amateur, 'fun' camera they react in a different way to being studied by a professional one.

    I recall one photographer saying he covered his camera in silly stickers to make it, and him, appear less threatening.

  5. #65
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    large digital slrs have pretty much destroyed the concept of "candid photography" in the news business. Bring out one of those monsters and people automatically perform.

    Decades ago the dictum of LIFE photographers was that you had to become invisible -- and with a small Leica or Nikon, both very quiet, you could. It is impossible to do so with a massive lensed DSLR, or even a film SLR, and while they do get a lot of different shots than you can with a small rangefinder, the is an intimacy that is lost. LIFE's brilliant photo story by W. Eugene Smith about a day in the life of a country doctor would have been impossible, or at least a lot harder, to shoot by a photographer loaded down with the usual couple of hulking giant lensed cameras.

    Of course, very few photographers today are W. Eugene Smith, too. I keep saying, great photography is 5 percent what yu shoot with, 95 percent you.

    http://life.time.com/history/life-cl...ntry-doctor/#1

    how much you? The article says that Smith spent several days with the doctor taking pictures with no film in the camera so the doctor could get used to Smith, and he spent several weeks on this one assignment. There is no news publication in the country today that would spend that kind of staff time/money. Maybe a freelancer could do it, I dunno. And then nobody publishes that sort of photo essay any more either, so what does it matter?
    The NY Times publishes photo essays on the internet and sometimes in their paper . Some are from various sources. Some are sepcific essays done by a single photoghrapher. http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/ I don't know if the paper pays in advance or how they handle these things. But essays are a real way to put substance into your photos. We all do it when we go on vacation and shoot a "slide show" for the family. But nothing is stopping anyone from doing a show that is more "public" in nature.

  6. #66
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    So I'm out shooting in a park with a little M43 Olympus E-PL1 with my senior citizen friends. I like shooting with a tripod when I'm doing landscapes. So this blonde chick comes over to see what I'm doing. Maybe she liked my tripod. So anyway she gets real close to see through the viewfinder. http://www.flickr.com/photos/alankle...57625797001770 Nothing like this use to happen when I was single and younger.

    So my friend Mel, who's an artist and who shot the picture, decides to paint a likeness of the photo adding a goose posing for the shot for some humor. http://www.flickr.com/photos/alankle...57625797001770

    You can't make this stuff up!

  7. #67
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    Geez next thing we are going to hear are SLR photographers pulling a Kanye and going off on the "lookers".
    www.ericrose.com
    yourbaddog.com

    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

    "The Dude abides" - the Dude

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    So I'm out shooting in a park with a little M43 Olympus E-PL1 with my senior citizen friends. I like shooting with a tripod when I'm doing landscapes. So this blonde chick comes over to see what I'm doing. Maybe she liked my tripod. So anyway she gets real close to see through the viewfinder. http://www.flickr.com/photos/alankle...57625797001770 Nothing like this use to happen when I was single and younger.

    So my friend Mel, who's an artist and who shot the picture, decides to paint a likeness of the photo adding a goose posing for the shot for some humor. http://www.flickr.com/photos/alankle...57625797001770

    You can't make this stuff up!

    Hey Alan, nothing like that happens to me when I'm out with my film gear, I guess English chicks are rather less forthcoming than American ones!......nevertheless I'll give it a try with my Olympus 35RC and see what happens.

  9. #69
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Goutiere View Post
    I worked for a small daily newspaper in the early 1960's. I used a 4x5 Speed Graphic with flash and power pack.

    I always got noticed.

    If you wanna get noticed, wear a 4x5 Speed Graphic with flash and power pack.
    Don't forget the fedora and the cigar.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #70
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Don't forget the fedora and the cigar.
    I was about 18 then, so no cigar, as for the fedora, this was in Canada so I had a toque.



 

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