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  1. #11

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    If you've been having a run of cameras that scratch the negs, I'd look to other possibilities. Change labs, change film type, and make sure your camera is spotless inside. I've had cameras w/ less than pristine pressure plates that didn't scratch the negatives. In my experience, it usually comes from the lab, dirt in the camera (it doesn't take much, so tap it on the counter several times and blow it out each time) or a bad batch of film. The ringer here is that you stated that you repainted the pressure plate. So that's a potential source of issues if you haven't polished it smooth w/ a rag or something.

  2. #12

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    I have two exackta IIa one scratches one does not if I swap plates the problem moves...

  3. #13

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    I've never noticed scratches on my self-developed films but some times the colour films developed in labs have them...

  4. #14

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    I would shoot a roll of black and white film and process at home to see if it's the lab or the camera. Either that, or try a different lab or a different brand or batch of film.

    The idea is to eliminate possibilities: the film, the film cassette, the lab, the camera, etc.

  5. #15

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    An update, some definite success.

    Removed, sanded, and repainted the pressure plate. I tell you in all honesty, the world is full of dust. It's everywhere, but most of it seems to be centered in my garage. So, *sigh* the paint dried with some dust in it. It still felt pretty smooth, so I popped it back in and did some tests. Looks good! I am now debating whether to leave well enough alone, or try and remove the paint once more and try for a cleaner application...
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  6. #16

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    If it's no longer scratching your film, I'd leave it alone.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  7. #17
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    If the new paint is sound, one could consider a light buffing with rubbing compound or very fine Scotchbright or some similar mild abrasive to remove dust blivets and leave a smooth satin surface.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ME Super View Post
    If it's no longer scratching your film, I'd leave it alone.
    sage advice

  9. #19

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    Something to keep in mind is that films are not all equally sensitive to scratching. Improving scratch resistance has long been a design goal with professional color neg films (I'd guess this is also true with B&W films, but have no basis to be sure).

    My point is, being scratch-free on one film doesn't necessarily hold for all films. So if you find that scratches periodically show up, pay attention to the type of film being use.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    Something to keep in mind is that films are not all equally sensitive to scratching. Improving scratch resistance has long been a design goal with professional color neg films (I'd guess this is also true with B&W films, but have no basis to be sure).

    My point is, being scratch-free on one film doesn't necessarily hold for all films. So if you find that scratches periodically show up, pay attention to the type of film being use.
    You're correct - I was given an old Exa camera a few years ago, fine with Kodachrome and most B&W, but scratched very badly on other E6. Yet the pressure plate seemed clean and free of anything abrasive, never solved what was wrong.

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