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  1. #11

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    I also enjoy 75mm focal length but otherwise use a 28 or 50.


    -Xander

  2. #12

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    This was discussed in a previous thread where people went round and round because one group defined "portrait" in the conventional sense (head and shoulders) while the other group believed it meant a 3/4 view of the subject or even full length. So a choice of lens depends on how you define portrait. For the conventional portrait in 35mm the preferred focal length is 80 to 105 mm to avoid distortion of the subjects features. For MF and LF the same rule applies with the use of lenses that have an equivalent angle of view. All this is usually covered in books on portraiture.

    SO ... before going any further we all need to agree on what "portrait" means.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 10-15-2013 at 01:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #13

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    I have examples. These I like. The first is w/ a Leica R 90 Elmarit, the next three are w/ the 85 2.0. I'm warming up to the 85 2.0. Maybe I just had some flat light on the first roll yesterday. I looked at some old photos from the 105 2.5's I owned (the old design seems razor sharp!) and I did notice that I was able to just get the front of the face in focus, but wow, it's too sharp for my tastes. The last one shows the occasional weird bokeh w/ the 85 2.0.

    Perhaps I don't need another lens, I just need another model like the first gal :}


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    Last edited by momus; 10-15-2013 at 12:40 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
    MDR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    This was discussed in a previous thread where people went round and round because one group defined "portrait" in the conventional sense (head and shoulders) while the other group believed it meant a 3/4 view of the subject or even full length. So a choice of lens depends on how you define portrait. For the conventional portrait in 35,, the preferred focal length is 80 to 105 mm to avoid distortion of the subjects features. For MF and LF the same rule applies with the use of lenses that have an equivalent angle of view. All this is usually covered in books on portraiture.

    SO ... before going any further we all need to agree on what "portrait" means.
    The 80 to 105 is the preferred and classic focal length for this type of photography because it as you said avoids distortion but honestly why should the photographer care about these conventions using a 35 or 50mm gives you a certain amount of distortion but it's not really that bad imo and a creative photographer can use these shortcoming to his advantage. I wouldn't go wider than 35mm though. I fully agree with your post I just think that people should start to think outside the box.

  5. #15
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    85mm or 135mm Zuiko. I prefer 135mm which fills the frame and gives me around 10-12 feet of working distance which doesn't scare my baby girl.

  6. #16

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    The Zeiss Otus 55mm 1.4 sounds pretty impressive at the shorter end.

  7. #17
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I think the ideal portrait lens on a 35mm camera is 90mm, which when filling the frame with the head allows a great perspective in terms of viewing distance.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    This was discussed in a previous thread where people went round and round because one group defined "portrait" in the conventional sense (head and shoulders) while the other group believed it meant a 3/4 view of the subject or even full length. So a choice of lens depends on how you define portrait. For the conventional portrait in 35mm the preferred focal length is 80 to 105 mm to avoid distortion of the subjects features. For MF and LF the same rule applies with the use of lenses that have an equivalent angle of view. All this is usually covered in books on portraiture.

    SO ... before going any further we all need to agree on what "portrait" means.
    agree is not something the third planet does...

    but the answer to op is use more light and stop down out of focus is not normally seen by our perception

  9. #19
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    The Canon FD 85mm 1.2L is the best I've ever used.
    Ben

  10. #20

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    in terms of focal length for portraits it is all personal preference. you can use whatever you like. I borrowed a 70-210 zoom lens and found that what I liked was in the 90-120 range. The 105 sits nicely in there for me.

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