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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    You should check out how labeling works. I deal a lot with the ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) and its Buy American provisions, and also the Buy American act.

    For anything to be called 'Made in the USA' there is a certain percentage of the materials of the product needing to be sourced on American soil, and then final assembly of 'most significant' transformation has to take place in the US. Sub-assemblies can be made elsewhere, particularly in countries with which the US has a trade agreement.

    I can't imagine any of this would be less complicated in Germany... That's a slightly facetious comment, because the US is the master of bureaucracy. But it's probably complicated in most countries, is what I'm saying.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12
    MDR
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    In Germany and Austria the added value is what matters if the higher value is added in Germany by say adding a red dot then you have the right to call it made in Germany or Austria. 99% of the Assembly can be done outside Germany or Austria and you can still call it made in DE or A because the value was added there. I belive Leica at least does some serious amount of assembling in Germany.

  3. #13

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    In the Modern World there are no places, only supply chains. Leica manages to still make "Made in..." work, but it costs a lot and gives them fits at times (e.g. APO 50 Summi.) Buy what you want and move on.
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDR View Post
    It's the somewhat wrong believe that german engineering is the best in the world. Don't ask me about the new Mercedes cars and their quality same goes for BMW and other German car manufacturers. Even at the height of German engineering the products were often overengineered to a point that hindered the product in the long run Zeiss Ikon cameras are a good example great as long as they work but boy can they get complicated when you want to repair them all those interlocks etc...
    I owned a 1993 Audi 90 CS. It was, along with a 1966 VW bug, one of the worst cars I've ever known. I will NEVER again buy a car made in Germany. What nonsense this 'best engineering in the world' crap is.
    John Voss

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  5. #15
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    I owned a nice Leica thread-mount camera that made awesome photos. Later I found out it was a Russian knock-off. The photos all sucked after that.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    I owned a 1993 Audi 90 CS. It was, along with a 1966 VW bug, one of the worst cars I've ever known. I will NEVER again buy a car made in Germany. What nonsense this 'best engineering in the world' crap is.
    +1

    Jeff

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    I owned a 1993 Audi 90 CS. It was, along with a 1966 VW bug, one of the worst cars I've ever known. I will NEVER again buy a car made in Germany. What nonsense this 'best engineering in the world' crap is.
    That's quite a statement to make based on a sample size of... two.

  8. #18
    hdeyong's Avatar
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    I can add two more.
    My wife and I did a house sit in South Carolina, and the owners had a Mercedes 500 series and a Cadillac, both mid-seventies, bought new about six months apart, the Mercedes cost almost three times as much as the Caddy. They both had about 155,000 miles on them when we were there, and the Caddy was on the go regularly, because the Mercedes was always broke down. if it wasn't the transmission, it was the electrics, and then the timing chain broke, and that cost another $1800. Meanwhile, the Caddy had had nothing but routine maintenance, and was still going strong. Mercedes and the like are really good, for about six or seven years, and then look out.
    Thanks, I'll take a Ford or a Chevy and an Olympus or a Canon any day.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by hdeyong View Post
    I can add two more.
    My wife and I did a house sit in South Carolina, and the owners had a Mercedes 500 series and a Cadillac, both mid-seventies, bought new about six months apart, the Mercedes cost almost three times as much as the Caddy. They both had about 155,000 miles on them when we were there, and the Caddy was on the go regularly, because the Mercedes was always broke down. if it wasn't the transmission, it was the electrics, and then the timing chain broke, and that cost another $1800. Meanwhile, the Caddy had had nothing but routine maintenance, and was still going strong. Mercedes and the like are really good, for about six or seven years, and then look out.
    Thanks, I'll take a Ford or a Chevy and an Olympus or a Canon any day.
    I found the Cadillac v8-6-4 cars particularly amusing. http://content.time.com/time/special...658524,00.html

    And let's not foget the GM Diesel of roughly the same era.By the way, what were the maintenance histories of those two cars?

    A friend has as a regular driver a 1963 Mercedes 220 Sb, something like 160,000 miles on the engine I rebuilt in 1995 at 280-something thousand. Beyond regular maintenance he has had no problems with it.

  10. #20
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    Go to Detroit to see the american engineering and Tokyo to count radiation from mighty japanese engineering.

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