Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,212   Posts: 1,532,066   Online: 1195
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 39
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,361
    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    I put the SR-T and Spotmatic in that same favored class where price was not really an object but quality was profound. It is a bit like the Buicks of the 50s and 60s: priced well under the luxury class but 'those in the know' knew that the quality was truly there. The marketplace affirmed this. After years of doing minor (stress minor) repairs I can gladly affirm that those two cameras, overall, gave me the least problems.

    But, of course, if there are newcomers here who want to read that as affirmation that they should get one of those, and ONLY one of those, I say this: Watch your mileage! An overly used Spotmatic or SR-T WILL give you problems a lot sooner than will a newish Yashica, Autoreflex, or, yes, even Zenit (ie, one that actually had quality control). - David Lyga
    David, these camera are all 35+ years old. Even if they've never had a roll of film in them, they're likely to give trouble due to old lubricants.

  2. #12
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    983
    Images
    4
    I have read a number of times that this was a photographers starter camera, and it is certainly capable enough to use in a professional role. I have one as well and consider it a fine camera. Mine has been very reliable but I do know people who have had problems with the film advance.

  3. #13
    David Lyga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,235
    No, von Hoegh, you would be surprised with how new they look and act when cared for. I have been acquainted with enough (dozens and dozens) of them to assert this, unequivocally. Actually there are no lubricants in the Spotmatic or SR-T. The gears are clean, that's all. I've taken apart many to confirm this.

    Problems with film advance happen with all cameras. Pioneer, maybe the SLR in question had too much mileage, or, perhaps, something tiny got lodged in the works. I once had a pristine SR-1 (the predecessor to the SR-T) and a tiny screw got into the curtain area and tore a tiny hole. But, yes, even these quality cameras develop problems with shutter and film advance if overworked with either so much use or, even if 'newish', grit lowering its effective life. Work cleanly.

    And, Randy, I literally lust for the H series Pentaxes. I think that they are the epitome of artistic design and I utterly love their simplicity and durability. The mirror's ease with getting scratches is an Achilles' Heel sort of (corrected with the Spotmatic and thereafter) but the H series I will buy forever. - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 11-09-2013 at 10:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,361
    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    No, von Hoegh, you would be surprised with how new they look and act when cared for. I have been acquainted with enough (dozens and dozens) of them to assert this unequivocally. Actually there are no lubricants in the Spotmatic or SR-T. The gears are clean, that's all. I've taken apart many to confirm this.
    Problems with film advance happen with all cameras. Pioneer, maybe the SLR in question had too much mileage, or, perhaps, something tiny got lodged in the works. I once had a pristine SR-1 (the predecessor to the SR-T) and a tiny screw got into the curtain area and tore a tiny hole. But, yes, even these quality cameras develop problems with shutter and film advance if overworked with either so much use or, even if 'newish', grit lowering its effective life. Work cleanly.

    And, Randy, I literally lust for the H series Pentaxes. I think that they are the epitome of artistic design and I utterly love their simplicity and durability. The mirror's ease with getting scratches is an Achilles' Heel sort of (corrected with the Spotmatic and thereafter) but the H series I will buy forever. - David Lyga
    David, I have the service manuals for the H1a, H3v, SP-1000 and SP-500. I can assure you that there are many points for lubricants, as you will see if you look at the same literature (which is easily downloadable).

    After several decades, lubricants dry up, spread out, etc. That's why they are dry, and wearing at an accelerated rate. Also, according to the Pentax service literature, the gears associated with the shutter are supposed to run with dry teeth and only the barest spot of lube on the pivot points.

  5. #15
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,132
    Images
    289
    Quote Originally Posted by David Allen View Post
    Annie Leibovitz described it as 'her first real camera'.
    www.dsallen.de
    Cool! Thanks, David.

    I just found out that it was Mathias Van Hesemans first camera and he still has it. =)

    Thanks for all the info fellows. Mayhaps I will find out who "THE" Minolta repairman is and send it in for a service.

    Shawn

  6. #16
    David Lyga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,235
    von Hoegh, I think that the lubricants must have been VERY spartan with these cameras. If they dried out, one would see residue. I have even opened one's that had gotten little use, flushed them out with lighter fluid, and did NOT replace any lubricants. After years, still fine. Perhaps on the pin that spins the gear or roller for the curtain. Honestly, lubricant is sparse but, according to your manuals, 'there', (albeit in tiny quantities). - David Lyga

  7. #17
    leicarfcam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    David, these camera are all 35+ years old. Even if they've never had a roll of film in them, they're likely to give trouble due to old lubricants.
    I don't know about Pentax but the sr and srT line used no lube. I've cracked open many srT's and found all to be free of lube. Dirt over years of use is what causes problems with this line.
    Leicarfcam aka Colyn

  8. #18
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,132
    Images
    289
    Below is a link to a PDF copy of the SRT101 service manual:
    http://acuravigorclub.com/Minolta/ServiceManual.htm

    I've downloaded it and stashed it away...

  9. #19
    wiltw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    742
    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    David, I have the service manuals for the H1a, H3v, SP-1000 and SP-500. I can assure you that there are many points for lubricants, as you will see if you look at the same literature (which is easily downloadable).

    After several decades, lubricants dry up, spread out, etc. That's why they are dry, and wearing at an accelerated rate. Also, according to the Pentax service literature, the gears associated with the shutter are supposed to run with dry teeth and only the barest spot of lube on the pivot points.
    As a young teen, I had what can only be called LUST for the Beseler Topcon Super D, the world's first commercial SLR with TTL metering, a pro grade beast with the rugged durability of the Nikon F (but with TTL metering built in). Now, over 45 years later, I have managed to acquire FOUR of these cameras (all with serial numbers of the original version Super D the 4xxx, not the later version 7xxx built in the late 60's/early 70's, as well as one of its smaller brothers the Beseler Topcon D-1. I ran film thru all five bodies, to check the shutter speed accuracy...and all five are perfectly accurate throughout the speed range, with zero evidence of slow shutter speed or inconsistency. Thirty-seven years ago, I bought an Olympus OM-1, and I still have that body. And its shutter speeds are accurate, too. Six purely mechanically timed shutter cameras, all accurate. One would think that lubricants in all six bodies would, by now, gum things up. I cannot account for the tested accuracy in spite of lubricant-gumming time...except for the fact that there was no lubricant! My (owned for all this time) 47 year old Beseler Topcon Auto 100, made for the amateur market and having leaf shutter, does have shutter timing issues.
    Last edited by wiltw; 11-09-2013 at 11:08 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    820
    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Dougherty View Post
    Minolta SRT 101
    Pentax (the system I regret selling a few years ago) lenses are still kinda high so I decided to go Minolta. I wanted 100% view finder coverage, a manual shutter and mirror lock up.
    Shawn
    I don't believe the SRT's - or for that matter any manual Minolta, had a 100% coverage. Of all the manual SLRs, I am only aware of the Nikon F, F2 & F3 as having 100% viewfinder coverage. Did you mean viewfinder magnification?

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin