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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roundabout View Post
    I have a 'new' Nikon FM2n. It came with what I've just discovered is the type E focussing screen. Which was a bit of a shock, as I've only been used to the normal 'split screen' variety.

    Any suggestions on how to focuss with this kind of screen? Are there any ways to confirm focus, other than guessing which bit looks the sharpest on the screen? The cross lines don't appear to do anything, other than help you keep the horizen level and so on.

    Thanks
    You really need a magnifier for that screen. I'm assuming it is the gridded, plain groundglass without split image or microprism aids.

  2. #12

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    When I use a grid type screen I use the grid lines as a sharpness reference. For macro work and for using zoom lenses or other slow lenses I find it much easier to focus with a grid type screen than with any combination of microprism and split image. If I know I will want to change focusing screens "in the field" I will use a camera like a Canon F=1 or Nikon F2 which will allow the screens to be changed easily and without any special tools. I might carry two bodies with different screens. Before I had different systems I has Nikon E (for the FE) screens transplanted into two Konica SLR bodies, FT-1 and T2. It really helped with macro shooting. I also like to use grid screens in medium format cameras where the lenses are typically slower. If I am shooting at higher magnification, like 2-5X then I will use a plain matte screen.

  3. #13

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    Thanks for all the comments.

    Yes, it is just plain glass, there does not appear to be any split image or other focussing aids.

    My vision is pretty good (well, a bit long-sighted). I just find the split image very quick for focussing in urban photography. There is always a straight line to use as a guide - even with a wide angle lens. But I'll experiment with this and see how it goes.

    I'd still be interested to know anyone's experiences with the Type B screen. It looks interesting.
    Last edited by Roundabout; 11-15-2013 at 07:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
    AgX
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    Well, it is not plain glass. It is grounded.
    There actually are plain glass screens for using the aerial image (though typically with a reference mark for locating the focal plane).

  5. #15

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    Sure. The point being, for me, that there are no focussing aids.

  6. #16

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    Interstingly here it says that
    The K2/B2/E2 and K3/B3/E3 screens can be used in the FM2N and FM3A interchangeably...
    https://support.nikonusa.com/app/ans...NROHNGbA%3D%3D

    Does that mean that I won't need exposure compensation if I stick K3 screen in my FM2n?

    Edit: http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...ls/screens.htm Seems to suggest this also.
    NOTE: Good news is - When you use a new K3, B3, or E3 screen type specially designed for FM3A camera with an Nikon FA, FE2 or Nikon FM2(n) camera, NO exposure compensation is required.
    Or have I misunderstood?
    Last edited by Roundabout; 11-15-2013 at 07:35 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    Nobody can agree on whether one needs exposure compensation or not.

    My FM2n came with a K2 screen, and I replaced it with an E3 (I prefer not using a split-prism). I measured a 1/3 stop difference between the two screens, the E3 being brighter. Test for yourself.

    Oh, and I agree that focusing with slower wide angles can indeed be challenging. The Nikon F2 series has the best viewfinders for that application, in my opinion.

  8. #18

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    The E screen in this series was for the FE. The E2 screen was made for the FE2. The E3 screen was made for the FM3A. If you use a screen in a camera it was not originally made for you will have to provide some exposure compensation. The Nikon F2 went out of production in 1980 and did not have, as far as I know, an E type screen as bright as that of the FM3A (E3). A benefit of using the F2 is that it shows very little distortion in the finder. The actual distortion a lens has will show up looking the same on any body but an F2, for example, shows less finder distortion than a Nikkormat FT3.

  9. #19

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    the direct answer to the op is you have to

    have good vision
    iterate

    ie. you need to just over shoot the point of sharpest focus and then back off to maximum clarity

    this is not necessary with a split image and a orthogonal edge

    it is difficult with ground glass with subjects without micro contrast

    the centre spot needs to be rough ground...

  10. #20

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    Well, I shot a roll and it came out fine – even the closeups. (I think these Nikon lenses are sharper than my Zuiko ones.)

    I think I'll still try an dpick up a split focus screen though. It's hard focusing in dimmer light with the E screen.

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