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  1. #21
    Nikon Collector's Avatar
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    According to the owners manual the F4 automaticaly switches to CW when a AI or AIS manual lens is used

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikon Collector View Post
    According to the owners manual the F4 automaticaly switches to CW when a AI or AIS manual lens is used
    You are not reading the manual correctly I'm afraid. I don't want to be pedantic but this will be found on searches and is, I'm sorry, wrong.

    On page 86 a table clearly shows Matrix metering is Compatible with Ai and Ai-S lenses, the limitation is with lenses modified to Ai by the Nikon or other kit. This is because original AI / Ai-S lenses have lugs built into the back of them to give the meter extra information. These lugs were not added with Nikon's AI conversion and are necessary for the matrix metering of the F4 or FA.

    The table appears in the F4/ F4s Manual referenced as Printed in Japan 9&141-804 (S155)

    Are you getting confused with the Programmed Auto Exposure Modes (PH, P) these require a CPU enabled lens and if selected without such a lens will show A (Aperture Priority) and turn off matrix metering, showing CW enabled, in that mode?

    I cannot see anywhere in the manual which states, as you say, a switch to CW just by mounting an AI/AIs lens, if I am wrong please quote the entry.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/red_eyes_man/

    Photographer not a job description - a diagnosis.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikon Collector View Post
    According to the owners manual the F4 automaticaly switches to CW when a AI or AIS manual lens is used
    Maybe you're confusing it with the F5 which does operate exactly this way. Matrix metering with AI lenses my primary reason for keeping an F4 around- if only I could learn to track focus at CH like the photographer RidingWaves mentioned...

  4. #24
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    I have been know to use my F-100 as a spot meter for my Hasselblads.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #25
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I have been know to use my F-100 with a zoom telephoto lens at 300mm as a spot meter for my Hasselblads.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #26

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    I understand the F6 will matrix meter and program mode with AI AIs AI'd and manual lenses (if retro fitted with the lift tag) now if only it wasn't six or seven times the price of an F100.
    This from a sunny sixteen shooter, sometimes just sometimes it would be useful.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/red_eyes_man/

    Photographer not a job description - a diagnosis.

  7. #27
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Things that seem "too easy" can sometimes be hard to trust.

    When cake mixes came out many years ago they didn't need anything except water, and they didn't sell well. They tasted fine and they cooked fine, those weren't the issues. The problem was that they were too easy, it was tough for people to think of those cakes as home-made; so the manufacturers changed the recipes and made us add eggs and they started selling well.

    Matrix metering works really well and is really fast.

    Sure, if I whip out the incident meter I might be able to improve things, a little; same if I decide to spot meter, again a little. The difference in most situations is normally pretty minor or nonexistent right off the bat, and with a bit of experience, a little thought, and AE lock on occasion, it can become a nearly bullet proof method.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #28
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    I'm glad to hear this. At this point my photography requires I concentrate on subject and composition. Freeing up a little brain power from worrying about exposure (somewhat) helps. I have found the matrix meter in my D90 is about a stop pessimistic in bright situations. I'm checking the F5 on the last 2 rolls,one unfinished so we'll see.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Things that seem "too easy" can sometimes be hard to trust.

    When cake mixes came out many years ago they didn't need anything except water, and they didn't sell well. They tasted fine and they cooked fine, those weren't the issues. The problem was that they were too easy, it was tough for people to think of those cakes as home-made; so the manufacturers changed the recipes and made us add eggs and they started selling well.

    Matrix metering works really well and is really fast.

    Sure, if I whip out the incident meter I might be able to improve things, a little; same if I decide to spot meter, again a little. The difference in most situations is normally pretty minor or nonexistent right off the bat, and with a bit of experience, a little thought, and AE lock on occasion, it can become a nearly bullet proof method.
    The metering method that has saved me most when I needed saving was film exposure latitude. Maybe I'm just lazy.
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

  10. #30
    Nikon Collector's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Livsey View Post
    You are not reading the manual correctly I'm afraid. I don't want to be pedantic but this will be found on searches and is, I'm sorry, wrong.

    On page 86 a table clearly shows Matrix metering is Compatible with Ai and Ai-S lenses, the limitation is with lenses modified to Ai by the Nikon or other kit. This is because original AI / Ai-S lenses have lugs built into the back of them to give the meter extra information. These lugs were not added with Nikon's AI conversion and are necessary for the matrix metering of the F4 or FA.

    The table appears in the F4/ F4s Manual referenced as Printed in Japan 9&141-804 (S155)

    Are you getting confused with the Programmed Auto Exposure Modes (PH, P) these require a CPU enabled lens and if selected without such a lens will show A (Aperture Priority) and turn off matrix metering, showing CW enabled, in that mode?

    I cannot see anywhere in the manual which states, as you say, a switch to CW just by mounting an AI/AIs lens, if I am wrong please quote the entry.
    You're right, I use several AI'd lenses and forgot they were slightly different from manufactors AI

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