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  1. #31

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    I've had no difficulties exposing B&W and colour print film with my FA, F90 and F90X camera in their matrix mode. It's the first time I hear it's meant primarily for slides.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinCrabtree View Post
    I'm glad to hear this. At this point my photography requires I concentrate on subject and composition. Freeing up a little brain power from worrying about exposure (somewhat) helps. I have found the matrix meter in my D90 is about a stop pessimistic in bright situations. I'm checking the F5 on the last 2 rolls,one unfinished so we'll see.
    There are certain situations that will fool any reflective meter, they are normally pretty obvious, thats where I use exposure lock; frame once for exposure then reframe for the shot.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    It's the first time I hear it's meant primarily for slides.
    It's not, matrix metering is matched to an ISO standard. A 400 speed film is a 400 speed film...

    Matrix metering is based on lots of testing done to see how (most) people like their shots to print/display. That doesn't mean it works for everybody, many people shoot and print their negative film differently because they can, not necessarily because they need to. Others have a real need or want to print more detail than a typical "slide" exposure might give them; that's just a technical correction to their personal E.I. based on their artistic preference.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    It's not, matrix metering is matched to an ISO standard. A 400 speed film is a 400 speed film...

    Matrix metering is based on lots of testing done to see how (most) people like their shots to print/display. That doesn't mean it works for everybody, many people shoot and print their negative film differently because they can, not necessarily because they need to. Others have a real need or want to print more detail than a typical "slide" exposure might give them; that's just a technical correction to their personal E.I. based on their artistic preference.
    It's certainly based on a lot of testing using slide and print film.

    BTW, I read a certain Kodak publication stating that their Ektachrome Panther slide film was designed to be exposed using in-camera metering systems (whatever that means ).

  5. #35

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    Matrix metering works great for me with bw film and my F6.

    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-o...52084%2529.jpg

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    It's certainly based on a lot of testing using slide and print film.

    BTW, I read a certain Kodak publication stating that their Ektachrome Panther slide film was designed to be exposed using in-camera metering systems (whatever that means ).
    Used car dealers in the area where I work proudly advertise a 3-day return privilege. What they don't advertise is that "that is the law, and has been for many years". "They" want people to think "they" are being nice and providing more value than expected when in fact "they are giving away nothing".

    I think Kodak was essentially doing the same; advertising that their film was designed to meet the ISO standard. Sure it's a fact, but so what? Fuji's isn't?
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    I've had no difficulties exposing B&W and colour print film with my FA, F90 and F90X camera in their matrix mode. It's the first time I hear it's meant primarily for slides.
    Exposure and development are very much a personal thing. It's what works for you. I'm quite happy using my F90X in auto-matrix mode for colour tranny, not so happy shooting that way with black & white. For many years I used FM2's which have centre weighted metering only. When launched around 1980 they were aimed primarily at the news photographer shooting mainly in black & white. Nikon were aware of the old adage at the time re. black & white.....i.e. that you "expose for the shadows and develop for the highlights".....meaning that in bright or normal light, many would rate their 400asa film at 320asa and slightly cut development. Nikon (as I was told by one of their technicians) based their centre weighted system on this theory.
    This meant a metering system giving a slightly "generous" exposure, which suited "black & white" but not transparency film. If using 100asa colour tranny in a FM2, then I would reset the metering to 160asa to bring out the full richness of colour.

  8. #38

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    I too have been using a couple of FM2 mainly with Fuji Press 800 film in the mid '90s working as a press photographer for a local newspaper, it was a student job for me at the time. I was also happily exposing slide and B&W film in my free time, all with success. I've left Nikon for another make. I've checked light meters on my new cameras comparing them with my FM2s before I sold them, the meters agreed. I'm sorry, I'm just not buying into that. But then again all my meters could have been faulty.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    I'm sorry, I'm just not buying into that. But then again all my meters could have been faulty.
    I agree miha.

    I have two Sekonic L-358's, an N90s, an F100, and an F5. I have had three other N90s, two FE's, an FM2. When tested they have all agreed within a third of a stop and I think that difference is mostly in how I held my tongue.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  10. #40
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    I've had no difficulties exposing B&W and colour print film with my FA, F90 and F90X camera in their matrix mode. It's the first time I hear it's meant primarily for slides.
    It works great for negatives as well, but if the scene is very contrasty I have found on the F100 and N80 that matrix metering will slightly underexpose the shadows compared to how I would like the negatives exposed. For a normal contrast range it does a great job. So I think it works better for slides. When they designed it they needed to bias it one way or the other. I think they made the right choice. Blown highlights in a slide will ruin it, where as blocked shadows in a negative usually can still make an excellent print.

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