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  1. #11

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    Almost always a grip. Exceptions are the little p&s cameras without them (T3, Ti28) and those MF cameras that one looks down into. With a view camera, the tripod tends to act as grip.

  2. #12

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    Either is fine for me, but no grip is smaller, so I tend to prefer that for carrying about.

  3. #13
    fotch's Avatar
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    I never considered the F3 to have a grip but I guess your right. I would not want it any larger than that. If I did, would mount a motor drive to it.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    I never considered the F3 to have a grip but I guess your right. I would not want it any larger than that. If I did, would mount a motor drive to it.
    Oh yes I wouldn't want it any bigger. I posted the question because I believe the grips in modern SLR not so much for user ergonomic but because the need for room to house the batteries and motors.

  5. #15
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    I got a PB-E2 to use with my EOS 3, mostly to use it easier in portrait-orientation, not for the 10fps (I rarely even shoot high-speed on digital, I don't particularly want to be changing film rolls every 4 seconds).

    I have some RSI problems in my right wrist, mostly computer/work related, and a skiing accident a few years ago busted my right shoulder so I can't hold heavy weights above my head for too long. So I thought a grip would be the perfect solution, I could hold the camera the 'normal' way in portrait orientation, especially when I can't stabilise it with my left hand because I'm using a 'smaller' lens (mostly Tak 50/1.4, FL 55/1.2, EF 85/1.8, EF 100/2.0 in the 'portrait' range).
    But it's actually a lot harder to use than I'd thought, because when it's rotated the eyepiece is actually halfway down the left edge and the shutter is above my right ear. So I've barely used it, it's no better (and possibly a bit worse) than just holding the ungripped 3 rotated shutter-over (sometimes when my arm gets sore I'll swap to shutter-under, but I can't do it for too long and can't be as soft pressing the shutter button). One day I think I'll just on-sell it (although it's a nice AA-holding backup, so maybe I won't).
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  6. #16

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    The reason most cameras after the Graflex came without grips is because they are designed NOT TO BE GRIPPED....
    ....BUT rather, they are to be CRADLED in the left hand....
    The right hand should only be used to adjust the "attitude", to level the horizon of the shot...excessive pressure only causes camera shake and shudder, resulting in blurry shots, misaligned horizons, and worse, carpal tunnel/tennis elbow pain for the photographer....less than 20% of the camera's dead weight should be "held" by the right hand...

  7. #17
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Some of my cameras have small grip,some a large,and one has no grip,but I've had them all for more than 25 years and am so used to them I don't really notice, which is one of the advantages of not constantly changing your cameras.
    Ben

  8. #18

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    I thought I liked the boxy no-grip shape, but times change. The larger the grip, the better, as far as I'm concerned, it's a huge help when maneuvering very large lenses. The mamiya 7 has a great grip, I could grip that all day.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitanikon View Post
    The reason most cameras after the Graflex came without grips is because they are designed NOT TO BE GRIPPED....
    ....BUT rather, they are to be CRADLED in the left hand....
    The right hand should only be used to adjust the "attitude", to level the horizon of the shot...excessive pressure only causes camera shake and shudder, resulting in blurry shots, misaligned horizons, and worse, carpal tunnel/tennis elbow pain for the photographer....less than 20% of the camera's dead weight should be "held" by the right hand...
    I agree with you but cameras like that of my F5 there is no way I can craddle it with the left hand because of its big bottom (so called vertical grip) and so I have to grip the right hand grip which is much less comfortable than cradle the camera like my F3.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by pen s View Post
    Don't care for them myself. But then I entered photography in the golden 1965~1975 decade with the best mechanical cameras ever made. None with grips, so it is what I'm used to.
    Same here. With me, it's Minolta SRTs. No grips. And my B&J 4x5, of course, has no grips. I guess it's all in what you grew up with. With us ol' codgers, "we don' NEED no steenkin' grips."

    We humans don't know what we like. We like what we know. If I had been brought up with grips, I'd probably prefer grips.

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