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  1. #11

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    So for these lenses the choice between new and old is mainly in the comfort of changing lenses. (true bayonet versus breech-lock).
    All Canon FL and FD lenses are breech lock. How do you suppose they could make the change between the old style with chrome ring and the later type while maintaining complete compatibility? The only difference is in how the breech lock is operated.

    Canon's first bayonet mount for SLRs was the EF for the EOS cameras.

  2. #12

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    If I were you I would not be in a big rush to buy a new lense. Let me explain, I think you would be best served by using what you have, finding out exactly what type of photography you find most interesting and the base any additional lense purchases on the type of photos you most wish to take. To a degree the type of photography will in may cases dictate what lense you may want to acquire in the future.

  3. #13
    fotch's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alastor View Post
    Well i didnt find a thread topic for introductions ...
    That would be this one: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum53/

    Welcome to APUG.

  5. #15
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Wass View Post
    All Canon FL and FD lenses are breech lock. How do you suppose they could make the change between the old style with chrome ring and the later type while maintaining complete compatibility? The only difference is in how the breech lock is operated.
    I refered to the bayonet type as in a post above the new versions were adviced. The new version is a true bayonet concerning handling, the older Version is a breech lock.

  6. #16

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    I would recommend that when you do start accumulating lenses for your Canon, you stick to Canon lenses. It's not that all 3rd party lenses are no good(I have a Vivitar 80-200 that is fabulous), but that you KNOW the manufacturer's lenses are good. Besides, old manual lenses are so cheap these days that there really isn't much to be saved by straying.
    “You seek escape from pain. We seek the achievement of happiness. You exist for the sake of avoiding punishment. We exist for the sake of earning rewards. Threats will not make us function; fear is not our incentive. It is not death that we wish to avoid, but life that we wish to live.” - John Galt

  7. #17
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    My recommendation, Alastor, I'd say that you have ALL that you need to get started. Unless you need to get a tripod.

    You have a great camera. You have a good kit-range zoom from moderately wide to moderate telephoto. The 1:4 means the maximum aperture of the lens will be f/4 (1/4 the focal length). A prime (non-zoom) lens would give you a larger aperture for low light and tight close focus control. But you are set. Polarizer. Flash.

    I say start making some good negatives and invest in film, processing and printing. When you find a situation that your gear can't handle, that is when you acquire the necessary gear to handle it in the future.

    Don't worry about gear right now. Be more concerned with mastering what you have and then get more as needed.

    You want to put more money into it? Spend a couple hundred dollars, find a cheap enlarger and get the stuff to process your own film and make prints. And any old small space that can be made light tight, even a closet, will make for a darkroom. If you're jumping, dive in head first. You won't regret it.

  8. #18
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    www.precision-camera.com does a pretty good job with processing. I've walked in to their location and they are VERY helpful. So, I'm sure the same over the phone and via mailorder. I did not try their scanning, though.

    I've used NCPS for their processing and scanning and can say it's top notch too.

    As for lenses, don't get sucked into the GAS spirle of empty bank account. I would recommend to take that 35-70mm f4 and have fun.

    One little different recommendation I would have is after testing out the camera and learning with cheap film, get a some fresh rolls of the new Kodak Portra 400 and shoot it. Get it processed at good lab and get _good_ scans.

  9. #19

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    you are in a camera fetish world...

    for foam you need mouse mat craft knife several straight edges scissors and double sided pressure sensitive tape

    for film processing changing bag, thermometer, development tank, measuring cylinder cloths line pins.

    for prints a scanner photo quality inkjet and PC

    for wet prints heavy drapes night trays and enlarger

    join local photo club get tanks trays and enlarger for free

  10. #20
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    One thing I would really recommend is a tripod or monopod. The single stick monopod is great for fast shooting. A tripod is even better, but slower to set up and use, plus bulky if you're mobile. Tripods cannot be beat for macro, low light, or night shooting. If you do use a tripod, also get a cable release so you don't have to touch the camera after you've set it up.

    I use both. I have a couple of medium weight Velbon tripods and a Slik 2110 ball head on a Velbon UP-4000 monopod that I've used for years now. It helps to keep the long lenses steady.

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