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  1. #31
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    In my opinion, the OP should have taken it up with the repair tech before making a thread here. .
    I said I was contacting him before you even posted!

    Regardless, I'm glad I posted the question and got some useful advice.

  2. #32

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    Hard to say with an old camera. When I was a kid I had a very early Honeywell Pentax that survived thousands of miles of mtn travel and wild weather without an issue, until I had to have it de-fogged once after a particularly miserable dunking trying to cross an icy river. I have a friend
    who is one of the world's most accomplished Himalayan climbers, who routinely used an all mechanical FM2 Nikon. Then he made a terrible mistake by switching to an electronic Contax right when he made the world's first alpine-style ascent of Kanchenjunga. So back to the ole reliable mechanical Nikon, which is what I also use for 35mm nowadays.

  3. #33

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    I use my F5s all the time outdoors and I live near Ottawa, the coldest national capitol in the world. Not often, but we do get to -30 once in a while and they both work fine. I do keep them under my coat however. Don

  4. #34

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    When my nephew needed a small camera for his expedition use, I simply bought him a basic Pentax MX - no winterization. He carried it in the
    arctic three months straight of climbing on Baffin Island, then in Patagonia in extreme cold for the first ascent of Escudo, considered by some
    as the most technically difficult climb in the Andes. The only thing that went wrong is that the battery operating the light meter got too cold
    and he got a few underexposures because of that. I warned him about keep a spare warm battery in his pocket. But when you're hanging on
    a six-thousand foot overhanging wall in sub-zero temperatures for twenty days straight, you might have other priorities in mind.

  5. #35
    adelorenzo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Which I pointed out above. When I repair something, the only guarantee I give is that if I make a mistake, or miss something, I will cheerfully set it right.
    In my opinion, the OP should have taken it up with the repair tech before making a thread here - and naming the tech. My posts regarding what may or may not be wrong with the camera were intended to make it clear that a properly CLA'd camera will work properly in cold weather, and that not all CLA's are equal.
    IMHO you were pretty quick to dismiss somebody else's work with the Ronsonol remark. That is why I mentioned that Eric's name is the most highly regarded in Pentax circles.

  6. #36
    VaryaV's Avatar
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    Hi Hatchet -

    Did you check the mirror lock button beneath the shutter release? It's very easy to bump.
    I was fooling around with my Spotmatic F when I first got mine and it did the same thing. Took a while to find the button as it's not in an obvious spot (and I don't have a manual).
    Sourdough, salami and blue cheese... and 2 dogs drooling with such sad, sad eyes. ... they're working me... they know I'll cave!

    APUG Portfolio

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by adelorenzo View Post
    IMHO you were pretty quick to dismiss somebody else's work with the Ronsonol remark. That is why I mentioned that Eric's name is the most highly regarded in Pentax circles.
    Not at all. I've made a lot of money redoing other peoples botched jobs and 'can't be fixed' items. When it comes to clocks and watches it amounts to about two-thirds of the items I see having butchered work that needs to be redone.

  8. #38
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I learned from the National Geographic photographers to have camera and lenses CLAed for low temperature operation if I am going to be in very cold weather for long periods of time. Then when I am back to more normal temperatures I have the cameras and lenses CLAed for normal temperatures.

    Yes it can be expensive, but I have never had any problems when I have done that.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I learned from the National Geographic photographers to have camera and lenses CLAed for low temperature operation if I am going to be in very cold weather for long periods of time. Then when I am back to more normal temperatures I have the cameras and lenses CLAed for normal temperatures.

    Yes it can be expensive, but I have never had any problems when I have done that.
    As I wrote Steve, it's having the correct viscosity of the lubricants in the camera, so they don't freeze.
    Ben

  10. #40
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    Sometimes it is an interesting thing with old cameras. I have a Pentax Honeywell H1a, the US version of the Pentax S1a. Back in its time it was a budget version of the SV, no timer and shutter stops at 1/500 instead of going to 1/1000 second. As far as I know my H1a has never been opened up, I know it hasn't since I have owned it. Although my SV looks absolutely pristine, the innards will reliably come to a stop whenever the temperature drops around 0F, refusing to take another picture until I take it somewhere warm. It must have grown up in Southern California.

    On the other hand, my H1a looks like a refuge from a war zone, but it will just keep merrily clicking away, no matter what the temperature, at least as far as I have found. I suspect it is a Montana camera.

    Basically both cameras have the same mechanisms, but they certainly react quite differently to temperature drops.

    Just goes to show, you never can tell.

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