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  1. #41
    Tom1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post
    Sometimes it is an interesting thing with old cameras. I have a Pentax Honeywell H1a, the US version of the Pentax S1a. Back in its time it was a budget version of the SV, no timer and shutter stops at 1/500 instead of going to 1/1000 second. As far as I know my H1a has never been opened up, I know it hasn't since I have owned it. Although my SV looks absolutely pristine, the innards will reliably come to a stop whenever the temperature drops around 0F, refusing to take another picture until I take it somewhere warm. It must have grown up in Southern California.

    On the other hand, my H1a looks like a refuge from a war zone, but it will just keep merrily clicking away, no matter what the temperature, at least as far as I have found. I suspect it is a Montana camera.

    Basically both cameras have the same mechanisms, but they certainly react quite differently to temperature drops.

    Just goes to show, you never can tell.

    Best assessment of the state of affairs yet.

  2. #42
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    I've shot in temperatures into the upper -30s (Celsius of course ) and not had any major problems. In dry conditions in the severe cold (-20s C or colder) you have to rewind very slowly if it's dry or else you can get static marks along the margins of the film.

    Of course, battery life is a big problem too if you use a camera that depends on them. Luckily, anti-cold battery packs are fairly cheap for film cameras now, given the drop in demand for film cameras. Battery on a cord... put it in your pocket and it stays nice and toasty. Just don't forget that your camera is now attached to your pocket!
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  3. #43
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    I've shot in temperatures into the upper -30s (Celsius of course ) and not had any major problems. In dry conditions in the severe cold (-20s C or colder) you have to rewind very slowly if it's dry or else you can get static marks along the margins of the film.
    Also advance the film slowly. The first time I had cold weather static discharge marks from advancing the film too quickly, I had marks all over the frame!
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #44
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    40 years ago ago I used fairly new Leica rangefinder and Nikon F gear in northern Greenland in temperatures down to about -50C (-56F) with no winterization and no camera problems. While outside the gear was kept at ambient temperature to avoid warming and cooling cycles, and protected from condensation when brought indoors. We had to be careful when winding or rewinding the film as noted above, and to avoid breathing on the lens or viewfinder.

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