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  1. #21
    fmajor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulDK View Post
    Hi guys.

    I'm thinking on buying an old film camera, but I'm in a little bit of doubt on which camera I should choose? There's three cameras I have in mind.

    Should I consider the Nikon F5, which I can find relatively cheap, even though the camera is a little bit big and bulky?
    Nope - pass on this because you're already finding fault with it ("a little bit big and bulky") - you will *always* second-guess/regret that purchase. Always.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulDK View Post
    Should I go down the medium format road with the Rolleicord/flex
    See my comment below on using a new-to-you type of camera (TLR) and format (6x6cm square)

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulDK View Post
    or should I return to the 35mm path and "drive the save up money car" towards a used Leica M6? Leica is of course a dream camera, but the lenses and body is still pretty expensive.//Paul.
    Yes, this ^.

    If the Leica M6 (or whatever other Leica) is your dream camera, you will be doing yourself a huge disservice by not getting it. It seems you're not in a hurry or have an immediate need to buy so why not shop for your DREAM camera. If you actually have to "drive the save up money car" a little while longer with a specific camera and lens (or lenses) in mind the delay in gratification will not disappoint (especially if you take your time shopping and source an example in good condition).

    Only you know what your intended results/final output will be so you have the best idea what will "serve you (and your photographic ambitions) best". If you're new to using a ground glass type camera (TLRs like the Rolleicord/flex are examples), you should be aware there is a good amount of learning to do. Focusing and composing an image with a TLR requires viewing the subject/composition you're attempting in a reversed and/or up-side down aspect.

    This difference in composing may be more frustrating than you were planning on.

    Also, TLR cameras are typically 6x6cm square format which is very different from the rectangular format of 35mm (or digi aspect for that matter).

    I really don't want to persuade you in any specific direction; rather, help you make the most-informed/best-for-you decision.

    So, things to consider:
    1) final output - prints (how big?) or simply scan and web-post or e-book to print
    2) object desirability (how badly burning for a Leica are you?)
    3) format/camera type familiarity (do you want to use something that's familiar to you or are you willing to risk trying something new and potentially not a good fit for you?)
    4) object cost (and not just the camera body itself unless a TLR - there are always lenses/filters to buy and other focal lengths to try)

    Once you come to what's really, really going to satisfy you, don't second guess your decision. Then shop like all hell is chasing you to find the best condition example available (not simply within your budget - "drive the save up money car" until you can afford it). You will not then be disappointed (unless there is a learning curve you do not get along with).

    I did this exact same process with a Mamiya RB67 Pro-S. I took nearly a year from initial desire to buy to complete acquisition for my dream camera. I searched and shopped and read as much as I could find about the camera, lenses and viewfinders - it was such great fun. Ultimately, I found great deals on superb examples of every component I wanted. During the searching journey I learned some things that not only saved me money, but ensured I had made the "best" (for me) equipment choice. My camera is an absolute joy to use and I'm comfortable with and aware of it's short-comings.

    Enjoy!!!

  2. #22

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    Another thing to consider. Do you really like rangefinder viewing and focusing. I always wanted a Leica M because of the precision build and nearly silent, for a roller blind shutter, operation. So I saved, got a really good deal on a couple of used CV lenses, sold a few cameras from my collection, and bought an M4-2 body. Only after owning and using it did I realise I miss TTL viewing and focusing. I actually perfer my ancient OM-1 with the 1-10 screen and most any Zuiko, a combo that is one tenth the price of almost any Leica with Leitz glass.

    I'll keep my Leica. It was my retirement present to myself. But in reality I really like reflex focusing. Of course a Leica and lenses can usually be sold for close to what you paid for them so that choice is not unreversable.

  3. #23

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    In your case I'd go with a Canon with the same mount as your digital has, will be much more convenient long term like that.




    JF
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  4. #24
    PaulDK's Avatar
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    About my photo style, I like to take landscape and city photos. I'm also interested in fineart. Generally I like to take photos of everything, except model photography.

  5. #25
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    First, I would try to borrow a Rolleiflex or other TLR for a few days to play with it and see if waist-level viewing and square format are something that works for you. It's a VERY different style of working from what you're used to with the 7D. If you find it works for you, then by all means, acquire one. I've shot with everything from 35mm rangefinder (Contax G series, Kodak Retina IIa) to ultra-large format (Canham 14x17). I think my all-time favorite camera now, though, is my Rolleiflex 2.8E. I've handled other medium format stuff too (Hasselblad- which I did love, but the kit gets bulky; Mamiya RB-67 - those 6x7 negatives are something special, but the bulk again!; and Fuji GSW690 - huge camera, it just didn't sync with my way of seeing the world), but the one I keep picking up and using is the Rollei. It also taught me a very important lesson - there are virtually no photos I want to take that I can't take with the 80mm normal lens.

  6. #26
    PaulDK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fmajor View Post
    Nope - pass on this because you're already finding fault with it ("a little bit big and bulky") - you will *always* second-guess/regret that purchase. Always...
    That is a really great advice. I have always wanted a Leica, and the M6 has build-in light meter. But since I'm not in a hurry of buying a camera, I'm going to take my time. I think it's going to be worth it.

    Thank you.

  7. #27

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    Check out KEH for prices and as mention before a good tripod is nice to have.

    Jeff

  8. #28
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Just get a nice 6x9 folder and some film and a tripod and be out there. If you dislike the folder you will easily get your money back on eBay and the tripod and any left over film will be there for you to use with a different camera design.

    RR

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulDK View Post
    That is a really great advice. I have always wanted a Leica, and the M6 has build-in light meter. But since I'm not in a hurry of buying a camera, I'm going to take my time. I think it's going to be worth it.

    Thank you.
    My first Leica was M6. Before I have used many other range finder cameras, but anyhow it took me some time to get used to a Leica. When you buy a Leica - give some time to grow on you .

  10. #30
    PaulDK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    My first Leica was M6. Before I have used many other range finder cameras, but anyhow it took me some time to get used to a Leica. When you buy a Leica - give some time to grow on you .

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