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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchetman View Post
    When using the original 828 film, the film advance mechanism works like a charm. That little lever catches the single perforation. The window is only used to tell you what frame you are on. A lot of things about this camera are really cool actually. The 828 roll is tiny so you could make a smaller camera, yet because no sprocket holes, the negative is bigger by maybe 20%!
    828, 28x40 frame size - 1120 mm2

    35mm, 24x36 frame size - 920mm2

    IIRC, eliminating the waste area of the sprocket holes was one of the selling points of 828. Also IIRC, the film and backing from 126 cartridges could be spooled onto 828 rolls. I last saw 828 for sale in the mid 1970s. The art-decoish Bantam 35 RF was one of the all-time coolest cameras ever made IMO.

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    My Dad shot a majority of our family photos on Kodachrome using his Bantam RF: http://kodak.3106.net/index.php?p=209&cam=1288
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    I always thought the bantam and bullet cameras looked great. Awesome designs that still hold on even today. I wish i could offer advice or tips but i am unfamiliar with the film format, Good luck with your project!

  4. #14

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    Dec 2012
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    I've used this exact camera a lot over the past year or so. Reuse old paper and spools with BW traffic film and sliced color film. Color takes more work. I set up a work flow like this. For color, I have a cheap plastic box camera that takes 120, I've inserted an Exacto #11 blade imbedded in a small balsa wood bridge in the film plane. The tip of the blade slightly depresses the backing plate. Load film getting it started in the slice. Close camera and wind. From here it's the same as BW. I have a yardstick with markers for the film length, so I can cut it to length. A piece of tape serves. a corresponding marker on the backing paper. Measure film, cut, Tape to paper-It's been unrolled and clipped to the edge of the table so I can quickly apply the new film, pick it up and re-roll. The whole process for BW takes only a minute or two. To process color, I remove the film and put it in a reload cartridge for 35mm. Let them know what it is and no problem getting it developed at the drug store. There is a online tutorial on cleaning and assembling that shutter and setting infinity. I went through it a few months ago. it s was fairly easy. The lens on these is very sharp. I need to replace the leatherette on the front of mine. It's a nice small camera, looks great and takes good pictures.

  5. #15
    micwag2's Avatar
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    I also have a Bantam, but i need spools and the bellows needs attention. Still trying to source a new bellows.

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