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  1. #191

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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    The Electro 35 does not measure light reflected from the film surface, therefore it does not have "off the film" metering. It is in fact not even "through the lens" metering, and if it isn't TTL, it can't be OTF.
    Oops, my bad, I misunderstood the phrase and misread the article on Electro 35 metering

    The light metering electronics works by accumulating the measured light level and only releasing the shutter when it has determined enough light has fallen on the film. This system allows the shutter speed to be completely step-less and to adapt to changing light levels. SLR's would wait many years for a similar capability with off-the-film metering.
    from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yashica_Electro_35

    Now I can say that I learned something photo-related today.

  2. #192

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    I have been shooting both types of cameras for several years. The main reason I shoot both systems is because Nikon and Canon each have some lenses which are unique to each brand. For the Nikon, I like the old 2.1cm Nikkor, along with the 28/2.8 AIS, and the superb 105/2.5. For the Canon, I love the old 35/2 concave, and enjoy the 50/1.2L, and the 85/1.2L.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here are a couple of my old cameras. They have both seen a lot of use, but these are actually a little cleaner than some of my other ones.

    The F2 is an old "no name" titanium model made in 1979. It saw a lot of professional use in the north Pacific area in Asia, and despite ice, snow, and salt water spray, it continues to motor on.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The F1N had been used for sports shooting, mainly high school baseball and soccer games. Here in Japan the Canon FD bodies were not so frequently used by professionals compared to Nikon, but they were a top choice of serious amateurs, and Canon has a long history and great reputation in the Japanese domestic market.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    It is rather hard for me to choose between the two cameras. The Canon features AE, but that is something which I seldom use. For the sake of it, I switched this camera to AE mode, and was quite surprised to find that it still works. The one drawback in the F1N is the electronic shutter. I have had to switch to my Nikon when the battery died in the Canon.

    I have tried other cameras, such as the Minolta X1 (known outside Japan as the XK). I found the Minolta to be the most finicky and unreliable "professional" SLR which I have ever used. I have two which serve as bookends on my book shelf. Too bad they weren't made as well as the SR series.

    Another also-was is the Pentax LX. But the selection of lenses was too limited for my taste, and I prefer the control layout on the Nikon and Canon bodies. I prefer the older Pentax K or AP for their smooth operation, and to use M42 lenses.

    If I had to choose one over the other, I would go with the Nikon, mainly for it's mechanical shutter, and easy maintenance. None of my Nikons have ever required serious maintenance, except an old Vietnam war F which had sluggish slow speeds. But I have taken apart and put back together some junk shop F and F2 cameras, and found them quite easy to work on. The Canon F1N is not as easy to get into.

  3. #193
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sangetsu View Post
    I have been shooting both types of cameras for several years. The main reason I shoot both systems is because Nikon and Canon each have some lenses which are unique to each brand. For the Nikon, I like the old 2.1cm Nikkor, along with the 28/2.8 AIS, and the superb 105/2.5. For the Canon, I love the old 35/2 concave, and enjoy the 50/1.2L, and the 85/1.2L.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150782.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	78.1 KB 
ID:	80747

    Here are a couple of my old cameras. They have both seen a lot of use, but these are actually a little cleaner than some of my other ones.

    The F2 is an old "no name" titanium model made in 1979. It saw a lot of professional use in the north Pacific area in Asia, and despite ice, snow, and salt water spray, it continues to motor on.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150783.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	92.7 KB 
ID:	80748

    The F1N had been used for sports shooting, mainly high school baseball and soccer games. Here in Japan the Canon FD bodies were not so frequently used by professionals compared to Nikon, but they were a top choice of serious amateurs, and Canon has a long history and great reputation in the Japanese domestic market.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150785.jpg 
Views:	26 
Size:	90.2 KB 
ID:	80749

    It is rather hard for me to choose between the two cameras. The Canon features AE, but that is something which I seldom use. For the sake of it, I switched this camera to AE mode, and was quite surprised to find that it still works. The one drawback in the F1N is the electronic shutter. I have had to switch to my Nikon when the battery died in the Canon.

    I have tried other cameras, such as the Minolta X1 (known outside Japan as the XK). I found the Minolta to be the most finicky and unreliable "professional" SLR which I have ever used. I have two which serve as bookends on my book shelf. Too bad they weren't made as well as the SR series.

    Another also-was is the Pentax LX. But the selection of lenses was too limited for my taste, and I prefer the control layout on the Nikon and Canon bodies. I prefer the older Pentax K or AP for their smooth operation, and to use M42 lenses.

    If I had to choose one over the other, I would go with the Nikon, mainly for it's mechanical shutter, and easy maintenance. None of my Nikons have ever required serious maintenance, except an old Vietnam war F which had sluggish slow speeds. But I have taken apart and put back together some junk shop F and F2 cameras, and found them quite easy to work on. The Canon F1N is not as easy to get into.
    If the battery fails in New F1 there's nothing to stop the photographer from carrying a spare, I always carry at least 2, anyway even without a battery the hybrid electro / mechanical shutter speeds of 1/125 to 1/2000 sec. plus B and the flash sync speed are still available.
    P.S. Professional cameras are I.M.O. designed for professional maintenance not unskilled labour on the kitchen table http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...tter/index.htm
    Last edited by benjiboy; 01-24-2014 at 06:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  4. #194

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    If the battery fails in New F1 there's nothing to stop the photographer from carrying a spare, I always carry at least 2, anyway even without a battery the hybrid electro / mechanical shutter speeds of 1/125 to 1/2000 sec. plus B and the flash sync speed are still available.
    And just because it's so weird and confusing: if your New F-1 battery fails, you must REMOVE the dead battery to have access to those mechanical shutter speeds. Clearly there's some sort of mechanical interlock working off of the big spring loaded contact in the battery compartment, and the battery must be out for it to engage.

    Duncan

  5. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by frobozz View Post
    And just because it's so weird and confusing: if your New F-1 battery fails, you must REMOVE the dead battery to have access to those mechanical shutter speeds. Clearly there's some sort of mechanical interlock working off of the big spring loaded contact in the battery compartment, and the battery must be out for it to engage.

    Duncan
    That's right, if all else fails read the manual.
    Ben

  6. #196
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Of course, if the spring breaks (like mine did) you're screwed. The interlock never engages, which leaves you with a dead camera when your battery dies. For this reason, I always carry a spare or two.

  7. #197

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    If the battery fails in New F1 there's nothing to stop the photographer from carrying a spare, I always carry at least 2, anyway even without a battery the hybrid electro / mechanical shutter speeds of 1/125 to 1/2000 sec. plus B and the flash sync speed are still available.
    P.S. Professional cameras are I.M.O. designed for professional maintenance not unskilled labour on the kitchen table http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...tter/index.htm
    +100

  8. #198

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    I have the old F-1 and it only needs a battery for the light meter. If that fails use the sunny 16 rule, the rest of the camera still works.

    Jeff

  9. #199

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kubach View Post
    I have the old F-1 and it only needs a battery for the light meter. If that fails use the sunny 16 rule, the rest of the camera still works.

    Jeff
    I have a Nikon F. There's no place to put a battery.

  10. #200
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    Very true I remember even as far back as 1986 when the Canon T 90 first came I was told by Canon's national service manager ( who's name was ironically Malcolm Tester ) that they had to hook up T90's to a diagnostic computer to find out what was wrong with them.
    To my knowledge there was not such as T-90 diagnosis computer (a good idea though). At least there is no diognosis plug at the camera circuit to connect to a diagnosis computer.


    I just bought a pristine but dead T-90. I shall still try to cope with the eletrical/electronical fault by means of multimeter and oscilloscope.
    Last edited by AgX; 01-24-2014 at 12:58 PM. Click to view previous post history.



 

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