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  1. #31

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    IMO if she doesn't care about neg size get a nice EOS1. You can do so much more with an autofocus camera. I shoot mainly with an old P67 and love the big film size, but it's very limiting and I'm sure I miss a lot of divisive moments trying to focus. (mainly shooting portraits).

  2. #32
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    You knew going in you would get a bazillion recommendations, right? I like sending her into a camera shop and wait for her to come out, camera in hand.

  3. #33
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    My vote is either the Nikon f100 or ideally the f5. I have the f5 and it is awesome, allbeit heavy. Combined with the Nikon 20mm prime, you will have a great landscape system. The 50mm standard is also great and only about £120 new. Or you get the f1.4 for about 300 or better yet, the Carl Zeiss 50mm with Nikon attachment bit that's a lot of money.

  4. #34

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    In my honest opinion. for shooting portraits with roll film you just can't beat a Mamiya RZ67. Yes, it's manual and with the waist level finder doesn't have a meter. She can learn it. She's got a good teacher, right?

    Get the 110mm and 180mm leaf shutter lenses. Also buy the flash grip to make it easier to handle. If she decides that she wants strobes pick up a used set of Novatrons dirt cheap.

  5. #35

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    I'd be of the "keep to Canon" opinion.
    They've had enough different models around to give a reasonable choice. If light weight is wanted take a look at the
    Elan 7 or 7E just a step below the pro cameras.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  6. #36

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    While I admire your bravery, I'd let her pick the stuff out, for about 1,000 reasons.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    While I admire your bravery, I'd let her pick the stuff out, for about 1,000 reasons.
    +1. Best advice.

  8. #38
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    For an easy transition, move within the Canon SLR body line-up. Going from a digital to analogue Canon will not present any pains or stress, save for learning how to load film (it's pretty darned hard to make a mistake, but some people I have known have punctured the shutter curtain with large bling rings!) and, in the case of the high-end EOS bodies (1N, 1V, 3, among) fine-tuning exposure (steps e.g. 0.3, 0.5 or 1), employing bracketing (on EOS bodies an auto form of exposure compensation) and understanding the capabilities and limits of evaluative metering systems, together with the specific applications of partial, spot and multi-spot metering — all of which have pointed relevance in portraiture. If cost is no object, Canon's L-series lenses will definitely step up to the plate with sharp images, and even the L-series zooms will belt out gems. All things related, how much you are going to spend on quality of lenses will determine the end result. Drawing a finger in the air, and from my own experience, the EOS 5 is an excellent base-level introduction, followed by the EOS1N, EOS 3 and the high-level and likely too over-specified EOS 1V. Don't get carried away with the reams of technology on-board cameras: remember it's you, the photographer who makes the decisions, it should not be the preserve of the camera to do so unless you implicitly want it so.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #39
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I'm surprised no-one here has asked if your wife has a sister.

    SNIP
    LOL.

  10. #40
    Black Dog's Avatar
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    Fire those Canons

    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    For an easy transition, move within the Canon SLR body line-up. Going from a digital to analogue Canon will not present any pains or stress, save for learning how to load film (it's pretty darned hard to make a mistake, but some people I have known have punctured the shutter curtain with large bling rings!) and, in the case of the high-end EOS bodies (1N, 1V, 3, among) fine-tuning exposure (steps e.g. 0.3, 0.5 or 1), employing bracketing (on EOS bodies an auto form of exposure compensation) and understanding the capabilities and limits of evaluative metering systems, together with the specific applications of partial, spot and multi-spot metering — all of which have pointed relevance in portraiture. If cost is no object, Canon's L-series lenses will definitely step up to the plate with sharp images, and even the L-series zooms will belt out gems. All things related, how much you are going to spend on quality of lenses will determine the end result. Drawing a finger in the air, and from my own experience, the EOS 5 is an excellent base-level introduction, followed by the EOS1N, EOS 3 and the high-level and likely too over-specified EOS 1V. Don't get carried away with the reams of technology on-board cameras: remember it's you, the photographer who makes the decisions, it should not be the preserve of the camera to do so unless you implicitly want it so.
    Very sound advice!
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

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