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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    Thanks for the link Vilk.

    I'm surprised to see a Leicaflex: http://img694.imageshack.us/img694/2...ser0002fl2.jpg (guy on the left) and a Contarex camera: http://img843.imageshack.us/img843/6...tographer1.jpg in combats.
    The guy on the left look like Don McCullin and the one on the right looks like Larry Burrows

    Sent from my GT-I9100P using Tapatalk 2

  2. #32
    andrew.roos's Avatar
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    Clay

    According to the Wikipedia article on Sean Flynn, JPAC stated that the bones recovered in 2010 were not a match for Flynn.

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk
    "There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs" (Ansel Adams)

  3. #33

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    Thanks Andrew, I never thought of Wiki having the story.

    /Clay

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AstroZon View Post
    The Navy and Air Force used Topcon cameras from '68 - '77. They were simple and rugged and had excellent optics. The Topcon Super D / Super DM were the last of line used by the Navy. They had a machined brass body and both a locking shutter and locking aperture. The military photographers were trained to keep them locked while not in use to prevent them from shaking apart during high vibration (which is inherent in just about any form of military transportation.) These cameras are so heavy and solid that they could probably be used as a weapon in a pinch.

    Attachment 80099

    But the military didn't just buy one brand. They used Speed Graflex 4x5 cameras well into the 80s - mostly for studio work. By the time Topcon ceased production of cameras, they had already transitioned to Nikons for general work. Both the Navy and Air Force used the Pentax 6x7s for reconnaissance photography (when not using pod mounted specialty cameras.) I've seen Vietnam era photos of military photographers using a Minolta HiMatic 7S, Yashica Mat-124, and various Polaroid Land cameras.
    I "inhereted" the darkroom on a navy ship in 83, at that time they were using Canon, AE1 if i remember right, at least there were 2 of them in the darkroom marked property of USN.

  5. #35
    PDH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikon Collector View Post
    I "inhereted" the darkroom on a navy ship in 83, at that time they were using Canon, AE1 if i remember right, at least there were 2 of them in the darkroom marked property of USN.
    The Navy and Air Force used Topcon cameras from '68 - '77. They were simple and rugged and had excellent optics. The Topcon Super D / Super DM were the last of line used by the Navy. They had a machined brass body and both a locking shutter and locking aperture. The military photographers were trained to keep them locked while not in use to prevent them from shaking apart during high vibration (which is inherent in just about any form of military transportation.) These cameras are so heavy and solid that they could probably be used as a weapon in a pinch.



    But the military didn't just buy one brand. They used Speed Graflex 4x5 cameras well into the 80s - mostly for studio work. By the time Topcon ceased production of cameras, they had already transitioned to Nikons for general work. Both the Navy and Air Force used the Pentax 6x7s for reconnaissance photography (when not using pod mounted specialty cameras.) I've seen Vietnam era photos of military photographers using a Minolta HiMatic 7S, Yashica Mat-124, and various Polaroid Land cameras.


    I was an Air Force photographer from 1970 to 74, as far as I know only the Navay used Topcons, the AF, Army and Marines used Nikon and Leica for 35mm , I did not do recon so I dont know if the AF used Pentax 6X7 or not, saying that I dont of any, I recall Nikon Fs for the AF and the Navy moved to Canon in the late 70s when Topcon stopped production of 35mm. I have seen a few F 1 with Navy markings.

    In my time the AF used Rolli cords and flexs, I talked with other fomrer AF photographers who used Yashicas, we also used Graflex/Singer MF and Konica Rapid 200, we had SuperSpeeds for field work and used a varity of view camera for studio work. At Mather AFB we still had a BJ 5X7 Rembrandt with a 4X5 back. Each Air Force Base worked from a table of allowance which depending on the mission and size of the base determined what and how much equipment was authorized. At the state side bases I worked at there was also some older equipment that had not been turned in when new equipment was issued.
    Last edited by PDH; 01-15-2014 at 08:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #36

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    Small World…
    I was also an Air Force photographer during that time period. Never saw any Topcons, only Nikon F's for 35 (which wasn't used much). Most work was done with MF, I had Rollei's most of that time, but Graflex XL's were more common and later the Koni Omegas.
    I knew several guys who had flown backseat in RF-4's over Vietnam which had built-in 8x10 cameras for the recon folks. But so far as I know all the handheld work from those planes was done with the regular XL's or else the Nikons.

  7. #37
    PDH
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    In 71 or 72 I attended a training with some Navy guys, all they did was complain about their Topcons, I on the other hand liked the standard Navy kit which was a Super DM, drive, 35mm, 50 1.4 and I think a 135mm, in a nice metal case.

    In the field we used Fs and M3s. Base side mostley MF, the superintended at Mather was a civilian, he always thought of 35mm as miniature cameras. I kept in contact with him for years after I moved on, by the late 70s 35mm had become the norm, he was ordered by ATC to deduce cost by doing most work in 35mm.

  8. #38
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    Dennis Hopper, Apocalypse Now

    Black Nikon F

    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #39

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    Thanks for the memories. There were hundreds of state of the art xerox telecopiers in saigon by '68. Great for sending facsimiles of 8x10 b&w prints over the phone in just five or six minutes of scanning But there were no blow dryers available to speed the drying process. Lots and lots of metallic bladed electric fans. And remember the 'darkrooms' in Saigon had to face the dilemmas of bad water, terrible humidity, and intermittent air-conditioning. The lucky photographers were able to send their processed negatives back to the US via air courier for later printing and publication. And the luckiest photogs of all just sent their exposed rolls of film (color and b&w) back via courier for processing on the west coast, and then on to their editors

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by lajolla View Post
    Thanks for the memories. There were hundreds of state of the art xerox telecopiers in saigon by '68. Great for sending facsimiles of 8x10 b&w prints over the phone in just five or six minutes of scanning
    I remember the credit under photos in newspapers would call the picture a "Telephoto". It would say, e.g., AP Telephoto or UPI Telephoto.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

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