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  1. #1

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    Got myself bargain of the century, now I need some serious help!

    Went to a charity shop today to track down some vinyl, saw a Nikon FG and a Canon F-1, both in great nick, languishing in the cabinet. Nikon was as-new, Canon had the tiniest bit of brassing here and there, but it still works a treat, predictably. The Nikon was dead, but £15 for body and a Kirin zoom with a stuck aperture and £6 for some new batteries sorted that out. Now, the Nissin 360TW on the Canon had a sticker on it, saying £25, which is a bit steep for that particular flash, but acceptable. I was curious, so I asked what the camera was going for. The dude said "no, that's the price for the whole lot." If it was a standard F-1, the body alone is worth many times what I paid, which along with the £7 I got the original 50 1.8 for, is an absolute steal! But wait! There's more...

    Under a blob of paint on the top plate, beneath the film rewind, I can make out a logo. That logo is a Lake Placid 1980 logo. This camera is the 1980 Winter Olympics edition. I bought a flash, and I got a camera worth nearly as much as my Leica thrown in for free! I'm feeling a bit dizzy...

    Now, my question is, do I have any way to remove the paint covering that logo without damaging it? The last owner blacked out the F-1 motif as well, which I'm not too concerned about, but if I remove the paint and the Lake Placid decal comes with it, I've effectively quartered the value of this body. Help!

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    Last edited by OliMonster; 01-07-2014 at 10:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    I'm a strong believer in the phrase, "The best camera in the world is the one you have on you at the time." I just try and have a good one on me all the time.

  2. #2
    mr rusty's Avatar
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    There is no knowing how easily that paint is going to come off. It depends what it is and how well it is adhering to the surface. If it brittle, like a lacquer, you might try easing it off speck by speck with the tip of a needle or similar. What is encouraging if you look closely is that one bit of the paint at the top has been scratched through and removed without touching the under surface - there is a definite gap in the paint "blob" which suggests that it is fairly easy to get off mechanically. Or you might try a solvent very slowly on a small area at a time. Start with water - you never know it might be water soluble! Next I would try alcohol/lighter fluid but this might also affect the decal so go careful and slow! and work in from an edge. If you can find something not too powerful that softens the paint then you are in with chance. Once you get to cellulose thinners and/or acetone I suspect the chances of not damaging the decal reduce a lot. However, Canon will have made sure whatever technique they used to print was robust, so there is a fair chance I think of cleaning the paint off.

    Good luck!

  3. #3

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    Great find! All they have in my thrift stores are those lousy little plastic P&S cameras. If the paint over the logo is enamel you may be able to remove it w/ very carefully applied paint thinner. If the paint that covers the logo is lacquer, then lacquer thinner will work, or maybe even paint thinner. If the paint over the label is acrylic, you can try some of the stuff below. If the camera is painted originally w/ lacquer you will be in danger zone trying to remove lacquer from lacquer, so try the paint thinner first. Is the logo a paper/plastic decal or painted on? That's the thing you need to find out. Be very careful w/ lacquer thinner. I'd try denatured alcohol first maybe, and go from there.

    http://jbosh1972.hubpages.com/hub/va...-acrylic-paint

  4. #4
    AgX
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    What ever solvent you use, try it first on both lacquers, the one of that blob and that of the F-1 (at a covered location).
    Let the solvent act on both locations for some time and add rubbing. If you got a solvent that harms the blob but not the F-1 under these circumstances you are right on.
    Most probably. As that blob paint may have had a solvent that well harmed the original laquer...

    Hard to predict though.

    Keep in mind that a solvent still may have slight effect on gloss. If it has some matting effect it could be hard to polish it again to the original state, especially if the latter is not of high gloss.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by OliMonster View Post
    Went to a charity shop today to track down some vinyl, saw a Nikon FG and a Canon F-1, both in great nick, languishing in the cabinet. Nikon was as-new, Canon had the tiniest bit of brassing here and there, but it still works a treat, predictably. The Nikon was dead, but £15 for body and a Kirin zoom with a stuck aperture and £6 for some new batteries sorted that out. Now, the Nissin 360TW on the Canon had a sticker on it, saying £25, which is a bit steep for that particular flash, but acceptable. I was curious, so I asked what the camera was going for. The dude said "no, that's the price for the whole lot." If it was a standard F-1, the body alone is worth many times what I paid, which along with the £7 I got the original 50 1.8 for, is an absolute steal! But wait! There's more...

    Under a blob of paint on the top plate, beneath the film rewind, I can make out a logo. That logo is a Lake Placid 1980 logo. This camera is the 1980 Winter Olympics edition. I bought a flash, and I got a camera worth nearly as much as my Leica thrown in for free! I'm feeling a bit dizzy...

    Now, my question is, do I have any way to remove the paint covering that logo without damaging it? The last owner blacked out the F-1 motif as well, which I'm not too concerned about, but if I remove the paint and the Lake Placid decal comes with it, I've effectively quartered the value of this body. Help!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_2664.jpg 
Views:	250 
Size:	542.8 KB 
ID:	79795

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_2662.jpg 
Views:	256 
Size:	398.4 KB 
ID:	79796
    I've always found it amusing, the Canon '80 Olympics editions. There were far more Nikons than Canons at the games, by a factor of ~10 or more.

    Nice find!

    Edit - That's not a decal. It's stamped into the metal just like the "Canon" on the prism housing. Try the mildest solvents first, say isopropyl alcohol for starters. I'd be afraid of lacquer thinner removing the paint from the camera, but you could try various solvents on another(Canon of course, same era) camera to see what's safe for the original paint.
    Last edited by E. von Hoegh; 01-07-2014 at 09:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6

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    It reminds me of the covering put over some logos on cameras brought back from Asia in the 70s. Customs required that because the official importer owned exclusive rights. If I recall, it was kind of a tape. You might see if that was removable and how.

    I'd start with alcohol (still talking about the paint here, not for you). Then I'd try the compounds sold for removing dried paint; a one brand here are "Goof Off". Typically found in home type paint stores.

    If these didn't work I'd progress to paint thinner, then lacquer thinner.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  7. #7

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    You might try heat, like from a blow drier, before you try any solvents. It may soften it up enough for you to be able to peel it right off.

  8. #8
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    And take heart that even if you do damage the Olympic logo you still got a tremendous deal on the cameras!

  9. #9

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    Alcohol won't touch the paint. Goof off, Paint stripper or one of the lacquer thinners should do it.

    Goof off is the only one I've tried that took off a base paint in addition to the covering.
    Filling in the lettering is pretty easy with a paint stick. Rub it over the area to be painted and wipe it off, it's a snap.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  10. #10
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    Filling in the lettering is pretty easy with a paint stick. Rub it over the area to be painted and wipe it off, it's a snap.
    If the logo is engraved, that's definitely the easiest way.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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