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  1. #1

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    Meter through B&W Filters

    Metering with a sekonik through B&W red or orange filter does not work , I have to meter without the filter and then use the compensating factor. Correct ?

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    That is the best idea, as the spectral sensitivity of the meter cell is an unknown and probably not at all linear. Translation: possible color blindness leading to erroneous readings. You're following the safest idea.

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    That's what In do.

    Jeff

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    Quote Originally Posted by lhalcong View Post
    Metering with a sekonik through B&W red or orange filter does not work , I have to meter without the filter and then use the compensating factor. Correct ?
    In my experience ,the safest way to go is meter withoutfilter and apply the filter fsctor afterwards.meters have a different spectral sensitivity to eyes and/or film
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #5
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    I always have accurate exposures metering through color filters with my Pentax digital spot.

  6. #6
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    Look up the filter factor for both the red and the orange filters, individually.
    With the Sekonic, adjust the ISO2 button to give +3.0 (e.g. 8EV) for the red filter. Meter the scene with the Sekonic with the filter in place. At the conclusion of metering (e.g. averaging), press ISO2 for the factored exposure. Transfer to the camera. Bracket up (but not down) from the reading/ISO2 setting, and take notes.
    Same technique for using a polariser, though a couple of potential traps there. Another time.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  7. #7
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lhalcong View Post
    Metering with a sekonik through B&W red or orange filter does not work , I have to meter without the filter and then use the compensating factor. Correct ?
    I think if you have a hand-held meter... Metering without the filter and then applying the manufacturer's filter factor is a good plan.

    Likewise, it's obvious when you put a red filter on the lens and the meter on the camera only sees one or two stops difference.... There's something wrong about metering through the filter. I've ended up with thin negatives exposed by red filter because I didn't notice it (years ago when I shot lots of black and white landscapes in 35mm on auto).

    So I was intrigued by the Gordon Hutchings filter factors, intended to be used after metering through the filter.

    If you look in Google Books for Using the View Camera By Steve Simmons, the free preview includes the page which explains the Gordon Hutchings filter factors.

    I haven't seen a lot of excitement regarding the Hutchings factors, and Doremus Scudder pointed out an apparent fallacy. The caption under the chart explains blue light in shadows are why you need additional exposure when metering through a deep red filter. Doremus pointed out that red light would curtail blue light to the meter, leading logically to the opposite conclusion, that a meter reading of blue shadows through a red filter will already recommend additional exposure.

    I have to believe Gordon Hutchings tested his factors, and so looked again. The practice described is to take meter readings of bright, mid-tone and shadow through the filter to determine exposure and developent... THEN add the Hutchings factor... If you base your exposure on three meter readings, the shadow reading isn't playing as much a role (Hutchings-style) in the overall exposure calculation... While shadows play a significantly greater role in exposure calculation when you base your exposure from a shadow reading and your development from a highlight reading (Zone System-style). So maybe the Hutchings factor works if you do your metering his way.

    One of my favorite thoughts about determining exposure, is that you can be eclectic and pick and choose pieces of technique that fits your way of working. But you should check that the pieces fit together well and do not correct for the same thing twice.

  8. #8
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    With the Sekonic, adjust the ISO2 button to give +3.0 (e.g. 8EV) for the red filter. Meter the scene with the Sekonic with the filter in place. At the conclusion of metering (e.g. averaging), press ISO2 for the factored exposure.
    I think you double-compensated here.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    In my experience ,the safest way to go is meter withoutfilter and apply the filter fsctor afterwards.meters have a different spectral sensitivity to eyes and/or film
    Actually, the real safest way to go is to hack the firmware/bayer filter of a digital camera to have exactly the same spectral response to your film in question, take test shots with the same lens and filter in place and look at the response curves. Or have a portable darkroom and develop your test-shots on site.

    But given that it's Black and White film then you'll have enough latitude that +/- 1 stop out from 'perfect' can easily be fixed when enlarging/scanning, so just meter without and take off the filter factor as everyone else does, it'll be near enough.
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  10. #10

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    I I am using 400 film and filters I would set iso 200 for a yellow filter, 100 for an orange and 50 for red, and meter using those settings, works fine for me

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